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  1. Hi everyone,

    Normally I rip Blurays with Handbrake using Constant Quality method. I use RF18 for movies I love, RF20 for regular movies and RF22 for those I don't like that much but won't delete either.

    Filesizes vary within a range I consider "normal" and I'm happy with it. Problem comes with movies like War of the Worlds or Minority Report, to mention a couple. The algorithm becomes crazy and filesize skyrockets. I guess it's all because of noise, am I right?

    So, how do you deal with this problem? Do you use NLMeans or HQdn3d custom? Any other tip I could use?

    I just ripped James Bond's Casino Royale and, despite using RF20 and NLmeans ultralight, movie weights 13 GB (with dual DTS audio Spanish and English).
    Tried ripping War of the Worlds CF20 and nlmeans medium, and filesize was fine (7.86 GB) but denoise was too aggressive and image was a bit on the blurry side.

    Thank you very much!
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  2. For CRF method of encoding, what is important is, how movies average out. You encode 30 - 50 movies and you realize what is your GB volume per movie. There are movies that surprisingly give so little bitrate that it is almost unbelievable. Those movies are the opposite to those bitrate hungry movies. I would not worry a bit about this problem. You say you are doing it for yourself.

    If there is a noise in the movie, it is meant to be there. It is a part of the movie and how it was done.

    There is a local noise specialist on the forum that goes into this subject and tested different methods.
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/358043-A-comparison-of-AVIsynth-denoise-filters
    So read that and get even a smaller buckets ready to squeeze movies in them just little bit more.
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  3. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Remember that what is actually making them harder to encode is COMPLEXITY. Some complexity is inadvertent and/or random, and that is the noise you and most are talking about.
    But superfast edits, high motion, handheld recording, enhanced film grain, sharp minute detail are all forms of intentional complexity that have nothing to do with traditional noise thematically, only they have similar consequences compressionwise.

    Scott
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