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  1. Hi, Thanks for the very interesting explanation.

    However there's 1 aspect thats puzzled me for quite a bit, and that is of the "real" time of the CD. Why is it that a wav file, or a movie file, which is well within the byte capacity of the disk will not burn if the play time is longer? I've tried to burn a couple of audio books on to CD, which were way short of 700mb, but as they were longer than 80 mins wouldn't burn.
    Why is this? Is the 80mins simply how long the Cd rotates for from start sector to end sector and why is this (seemingly) unrelated to the number of bytes on the CD? If this is the case does the CD spin slower for a small sized file, which is 70mins long compared to a large sized file of same "real time" length?
    Sorry if this is a "noddie newbie" question but I've searched for the answer to this but can't spot it if its answered somewhere else.
    Incidentally, my second attempt at using my new DVD writer created a DVD with 7.99 TB on it!! (yep 8,796,093,020,160 bytes) Is this a record? Seems a shame to format it!!
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  2. Good day,

    Originally Posted by JohkneeB
    However there's 1 aspect thats puzzled me for quite a bit, and that is of the "real" time of the CD. Why is it that a wav file, or a movie file, which is well within the byte capacity of the disk will not burn if the play time is longer? I've tried to burn a couple of audio books on to CD, which were way short of 700mb, but as they were longer than 80 mins wouldn't burn.

    Why is this? Is the 80mins simply how long the Cd rotates for from start sector to end sector and why is this (seemingly) unrelated to the number of bytes on the CD? If this is the case does the CD spin slower for a small sized file, which is 70mins long compared to a large sized file of same "real time" length?
    If you are making an audio CD, then the burning program is probably reformating the audio to the specifications required for an audio CD... i.e., uncompressed PCM 16-bit stereo audio sampled at 44.1 kHz. You can't, after all, make a playable audio CD in any other format...

    Regards.
    Michael Tam
    w: Morsels of Evidence
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