VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 19 of 19
Thread
  1. Are there any on the market from reputable brands?

    Currently using a couple of WD MyPassport 4TB HDDs powered by USB cable but I'm slowly running out of space.

    Trying to double the capacity but all external 8TB HDDs or greater requires additional power line plugged in.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    2.5" hard drives max out at 5TB. All 3.5" hard drives require an additional 12V power supply.

    The only hard drive manufacturers are WD, Seagate and Toshiba.

    If you want a >5TB USB powered drive, you have to get an SSD, which is very expensive compared to hard drives.

    In theory, IF your USB-C port and cable supplies the 12V passthrough, you could DIY a breakout to use that power a 3.5" external drive. But there's no off the shelf solution that I'm aware of.

    There was a 3.5" external that ran off USB-C, but has been discontinued. Very likely because not all USB-C ports and cables support the 12V power line.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    2.5" hard drives max out at 5TB. All 3.5" hard drives require an additional 12V power supply.

    The only hard drive manufacturers are WD, Seagate and Toshiba.

    If you want a >5TB USB powered drive, you have to get an SSD, which is very expensive compared to hard drives.

    In theory, IF your USB-C port and cable supplies the 12V passthrough, you could DIY a breakout to use that power a 3.5" external drive. But there's no off the shelf solution that I'm aware of.

    There was a 3.5" external that ran off USB-C, but has been discontinued. Very likely because not all USB-C ports and cables support the 12V power line.
    Thanks buddy, much appreciated for insight. No rush, can wait for next decade of technological advancement - maybe it'll be possible to increase the capacity of USB-powered only drives
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    Israel
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Are there any on the market from reputable brands?

    Currently using a couple of WD MyPassport 4TB HDDs powered by USB cable but I'm slowly running out of space.

    Trying to double the capacity but all external 8TB HDDs or greater requires additional power line plugged in.
    I have several WD MyPassport 4TB and 5TB drives and they work well so far. I prefer several drives instead of just one big size to minimize the risk of failure as I would loose all the data.
    I plan to buy soon two more 5TB MyPassport Ultra drives the new version (blue). They are slightly more expensive (Support USB-C and USB 3.1)
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    Is there not a 2.5" SATA hard disk inside Toshiba Canvio (P/N:HDTC610XK3B1) that could be used in a different enclosure? What about Verbatim Store 'n' Go (#53023)?
    Last edited by kyrcy; 29th Nov 2023 at 14:47.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by kyrcy View Post
    Is there not a 2.5" SATA hard disk inside Toshiba Canvio (P/N:HDTC610XK3B1) that could be used in a different enclosure? What about Verbatim Store 'n' Go (#53023)?
    I don't know about that specific drive but the Toshiba Canvio drive that I had did not have a standard SATA connector, the usb connector was wired directly to the drive's circuit board. No way to use it in another enclosure.
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    Last edited by tuskacz; 29th Nov 2023 at 23:26.
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Hey thanks. But I have no free USB-C ports in the laptop. To power up my external HDDs I use below hub:
    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61NwsZMBAHL.jpg

    So to use your HDD do I need to buy USB-C hub separately, or I buy USB-A to USB-C cable converter?
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Hey thanks. But I have no free USB-C ports in the laptop. To power up my external HDDs I use below hub:
    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61NwsZMBAHL.jpg

    So to use your HDD do I need to buy USB-C hub separately, or I buy USB-A to USB-C cable converter?
    this is the one i have - https://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/7822
    the USB A adapter is built in to the USB C cable.
    Quote Quote  
  13. Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Australia-PAL Land
    Search Comp PM
    I sincerely hope it's not 15.5cm high (and the others)!
    Quote Quote  
  14. Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Hey thanks. But I have no free USB-C ports in the laptop. To power up my external HDDs I use below hub:
    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61NwsZMBAHL.jpg

    So to use your HDD do I need to buy USB-C hub separately, or I buy USB-A to USB-C cable converter?
    this is the one i have - https://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/7822
    the USB A adapter is built in to the USB C cable.
    Real nice thanks. Are you using 8TB capacity for it? How hot are they?
    Quote Quote  
  15. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Europe
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    CrystalDiskInfo identifies the hard disk inside Toshiba Canvio as belonging to MQ01ABD Series.

    https://storage.toshiba.com/internal-specialty-hdd/pc/mq01abd-series

    I suppose I will have to open it up to find out for sure, but could this still be not a SATA?
    Quote Quote  
  16. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Yes. There are no special drives for any external.
    Quote Quote  
  17. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Hey thanks. But I have no free USB-C ports in the laptop. To power up my external HDDs I use below hub:
    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61NwsZMBAHL.jpg

    So to use your HDD do I need to buy USB-C hub separately, or I buy USB-A to USB-C cable converter?
    this is the one i have - https://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/7822
    the USB A adapter is built in to the USB C cable.
    Real nice thanks. Are you using 8TB capacity for it? How hot are they?
    right now i just have a 1TB NVME in one of the bays, and for it getting hot, so for
    it's just barely warm when in use. both bays can use up to 4TB each.

    the one i linked to in post #11 can use up to 8TB but only one NVME can be used in the case
    at a time.
    Last edited by october262; 30th Nov 2023 at 11:51.
    Quote Quote  
  18. Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by tuskacz View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I recommend not buying 2.5" WD or Toshiba externals because:

    The USB port and interface are integrated into the mainboard, unlike Seagate portables which are regular SATA drives with a detachable interface. If/when the interface fails on a WD or Toshiba, you have to mod the board to a SATA interface for data recovery. Which is every expensive, $$$.

    In addition, Passport drives have an encryption chip that must be bypassed for data recovery, which incurs an extra fee.

    https://www.300dollardatarecovery.com/data-recovery-prices/#usbpcb

    Don't pay extra for USB-C or USB 3.1. USB 3.0 is more than enough for any hard drive because the available bandwidth is ~480MB/s, but any conventional hard drive maxes out at ~200-250MB/s.*

    *Seagate's new 3.5" Mach 2 hard drives, which use two actuators reportedly can hit up to 524MB/s, but that technology is new and limited to 3.5" drives only.
    That's why I'm using second HDD for the backup plus cloud backup. So essentially two backups to mitigate risk of hardware failure. Even if two HDDs stop working at the same time (unlikely but possible), I'll just buy new one and restore from cloud.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I never owned a Toshiba portable, but according to reports they haven't been regular SATA drives for years. As for Verbatim or any other third party portable, check the SMART with a program like CrystalDiskInfo and if the drive is anything other than a Seagate, it's very likely not to have a standard SATA drive inside.

    In addition, any third party portable or 3.5" external maker can change their drive supplier at any time. The exceptions are LaCie, which is owned by Seagate and Sandisk Pro/G-Tech(nology)/G-Drive which is owned by WD.

    The real mystery is why WD and Toshiba does this? In theory, it may reduce the chance of failure vs a detachable interface, but the more likely answer is that it forces you to by a new drive when the interface fails.
    Wouldn't be surprised by this. Call it a conspiracy theory or whatever you like but plenty of companies today make stuff aimed not to be too durable and for long. Stuff made by accountants not by engineers. So it fails after its lifespan is met and you need to buy new one from them and your money spent keep them floating in the business.
    consider getting one of these - https://www.ebay.com/itm/355119534051?hash=item52aec60fe3:g:KhIAAOSw3UplMWHE&amdata=en...Bk9SR5SvlvKDYw

    has support for up to 8TB M.2 NVME USB 3 & USB C. & no external power adapter is required.
    Hey thanks. But I have no free USB-C ports in the laptop. To power up my external HDDs I use below hub:
    https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/61NwsZMBAHL.jpg

    So to use your HDD do I need to buy USB-C hub separately, or I buy USB-A to USB-C cable converter?
    this is the one i have - https://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/7822
    the USB A adapter is built in to the USB C cable.
    Real nice thanks. Are you using 8TB capacity for it? How hot are they?
    right now i just have a 1TB NVME in one of the bays, and for it getting hot, so for
    it's just barely warm when in use. both bays can use up to 4TB each.

    the one i linked to in post #11 can use up to 8TB but only one NVME can be used in the case
    at a time.
    So for 2 bays it'll require two separate USB cables to connect to PC. One too many.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads

Visit our sponsor! Try DVDFab and backup Blu-rays!