VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 23 of 23
Thread
  1. Sometimes it's quite refreshing to change the distro. A few days ago I decided to switch to MX Linux. It does take a bit of work, but it's even more noticeable afterwards. Above all, the user software is much more up-to-date and often contains pleasant surprises. Of course, special attention is paid to the AV capabilities. In any case, so far there has always been a solution to various problems. It would be interesting to hear what experiences others have had with such changes.
    Quote Quote  
  2. New user
    Join Date
    Nov 2023
    Location
    Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by MicroMagic View Post
    Sometimes it's quite refreshing to change the distro. A few days ago I decided to switch to MX Linux. It does take a bit of work, but it's even more noticeable afterwards. Above all, the user software is much more up-to-date and often contains pleasant surprises. Of course, special attention is paid to the AV capabilities. In any case, so far there has always been a solution to various problems. It would be interesting to hear what experiences others have had with such changes.
    Nice, things were pretty good when i switched to SuSe 8.2 many years ago, but for me the people helped out very much before i installed it, which basicly was the reason i installed the SuSe 8.2.. Unluckily the ones who helped me then had alot of work to do in their life so it was not so easy to find help from others on the internet then imo! I seem to remember mostly word tweakers and incomplete stuff was found.. Alltough some people had good stuff but it was not all avalible freely on the web.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    England
    Search Comp PM
    By complete coincidence, I too have just migrated to MX-23 after seven and a half years with Manjaro. The biggest problem for me in leaving Manjaro was getting another distro's Firefox and Thunderbird to accept the config files "You have launched an older version" or similar words and until I found AppImages and Flatpaks, there was no way except starting a complete new profile for each and losing all bookmarks, settings and emails. It wasn't a problem with MX-23, I migrated on its first day of release and they were both up-to-date.

    I have it on two different machines, a PC I use for video editing and a laptop I use for almost everything else. Xfce on the editing PC as it has a feature I need to make use of occasionally, KDE on the laptop as it runs better on it than Xfce.

    I came to MX via a brief stay with Linux Mint, but I dislike Ubuntu and wasn't happy at having it in the mix. I liked LMDE, but it failed at one particular task and, as I couldn't find a way round it, it had to go. I keep telling myself it doesn't matter what the distro is called or what it is derived from as long as it does what I ask of it, but I obviously don't listen too well!

    As much as I liked Manjaro to use, I found the rolling release not quite as permanent an install as it should have been and had to re-install it a few times after updates failed. I don't want my OS to be a hobby, I want to use it for my other hobbies and the necessities, so the last failure made me grit my teeth and get out whatever it took. It was much easier than I feared. I quite like MX, I'm getting used to it, so far it does everything I ask of it and I think I will stay with it.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by MicroMagic View Post
    .... A few days ago I decided to switch to MX Linux. .... Above all, the user software is much more up-to-date ... special attention is paid to the AV capabilities. In any case, so far there has always been a solution to various problems.....
    MX 21 has been my daily driver for getting on a couple of years and I like it more than any other distro I've tried. Haven't run Windows in over a decade.

    I have to wonder, though, the software is more up to date than what? RHEL? MX is Debian Stable based. The one thing I offer as a caveat for MX is that Debian Stable is indeed very stable but you get older versions of software than most anything except RHEL and it's not ideal for new hardware.

    Of course you can enable the Debian sid (bleeding edge) repo but that will also make one of the most stable versions of Linux a whole lot less stable. Which, at least for me, defeats the purpose of using a Debian Stable base in the first place. You can have stability or new software in Linux. Not both.

    I don't really know what "special attention was paid to the AV capabilities" is either. I fail to see anything there. It's just Debian really underneath. Pretty vanilla, which is how I like it. I don't actually use any of the preloaded AV file playing software. Usually SMplayer or Audacious.

    Also, I don't think that a lot of Windows users who do serious multimedia work would be impressed with any Linux distro. The selection of software isn't nearly as good. For any sort of pro music studio work it's pretty hopeless.

    One thing about the KDE version I run is that if you hot plug an external USB DAC it will automatically switch to it. That's a KDE function, not MX, and it may sound trite, but Linux desktops don't usually have this sort of thing. Even the RAM hogs, which KDE is not any more.

    It's true that their user support forum seems pretty damn good for a smaller distro, and, unusually, a number of MX devs participate there. Support is the #1 thing for new Linux users and most forums stink.

    I had almost no issues when I installed MX ... just things like wakeonlan in the BIOS ... and I've never bothered with the MX forums. I just searched the Debian user forum. One of the nice things about having a Debian base, if you know what to look for, is the high level of expertise of the average Debian user. It means you don't have to go through pages and pages in forums that never get anywhere.

    For Linux beginners I'd actually recommend Ubuntu or Mint because of their user support. Those coming from Windows need to know that the users on these support forums aren't being paid to do it. You're more likely to get questions answered in the Mint forums but you're more likely to get a correct answer in the Ubuntu forums.

    But yes, I really like MX. It's a fine bunch of geeks.
    Last edited by Hoser Rob; 11th Nov 2023 at 12:42.
    Quote Quote  
  5. To add my experiences, I have been using Linux for over 20 years, since the days when I built a new PC with a 900mhz Athlon, 256mb ram, a TNT video card and dual booted Win 2k with Red Hat. At some point I added Ximian Gnome on top of Red Hat. I am currently writing this from Fedora 39 + KDE.

    Here's the thing, Windows OSes tend to be way more stable than any Linux distro I have ever tried, and I am sure that I have tried distros most people have never heard of.

    With Windows, you usually have to pull people away from the version they are using kicking and screaming to them to try an updated version.

    For me, I stuck with Win 2k until I needed DX8, which required Win XP. I stuck with XP64 until i had no choice and had to upgrade to Win 7 to be able to support new hardware and software.

    I stuck with Win 7 until I had no choice but switch to Win 10 and I intend to stick with Win 10 until i absolutely have to upgrade to a newer version of Windows.

    With Linux based OSes, I find myself jumping from one distro to another, because every one that I have found has some bugs that result in instability or odd behavior.

    Ubuntu used to be a very stable offering, but the newer releases are garbage and one of the spins recommends against upgrading to the newest version unless you have to, lol. Mate has taken a step back, with freezes and crashes constantly, Gnome is a joke, it looks like it was designed by the same people that designed the original XP GUI, KDE has some weird bugs, XFCE is unusable, I don't know how anyone can stomach it for more than 3 minutes.

    Manjaro, like any other Arch based distro, breaks if you enable AUR, the Mandriva offspring have so many bugs they barely function, Fedora requires a lot of landholding to get it to where you want but it's one of the better offerings, if you don't mind the usual Linux issues, OpenSuse may be the best offering out there but it's installer is such a mess.

    Then you have the idiotic politics like was is going on with Red Hat and all the clones that want to steal Red Hat's work and sell it as their own.

    Let's not forget the bugs that take decades to find and fix, like the X11 bug that took 35 years to fix, the Gnome memory leak that took 10 years, the WINE bug that took 13 years or the curl bug that took 2 years.

    Let's face it, there's a reason why they give Linux based distros away for free, it's because that is all they are worth.

    If Fedora, Ubuntu, SUSE, Debian, Arch and the rest said that the next release would follow a Windows style EULA, where you have to spend $150 for a license that allows you on install on one computer, and they were going to enforce it with activation, would anyone use Linux?

    Or if Microsoft said that starting with Windows 12, it is legally free, you can download it and install it on as many computers as you want, no activation and they will make it open source released under an MIT license, who would actually pick a Linux distro over Windows?
    Quote Quote  
  6. New user
    Join Date
    Nov 2023
    Location
    Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by sophisticles View Post
    To add my experiences, I have been using Linux for over 20 years, since the days when I built a new PC with a 900mhz Athlon, 256mb ram, a TNT video card and dual booted Win 2k with Red Hat. At some point I added Ximian Gnome on top of Red Hat. I am currently writing this from Fedora 39 + KDE.

    Here's the thing, Windows OSes tend to be way more stable than any Linux distro I have ever tried, and I am sure that I have tried distros most people have never heard of.

    With Windows, you usually have to pull people away from the version they are using kicking and screaming to them to try an updated version.

    For me, I stuck with Win 2k until I needed DX8, which required Win XP. I stuck with XP64 until i had no choice and had to upgrade to Win 7 to be able to support new hardware and software.

    I stuck with Win 7 until I had no choice but switch to Win 10 and I intend to stick with Win 10 until i absolutely have to upgrade to a newer version of Windows.

    With Linux based OSes, I find myself jumping from one distro to another, because every one that I have found has some bugs that result in instability or odd behavior.

    Ubuntu used to be a very stable offering, but the newer releases are garbage and one of the spins recommends against upgrading to the newest version unless you have to, lol. Mate has taken a step back, with freezes and crashes constantly, Gnome is a joke, it looks like it was designed by the same people that designed the original XP GUI, KDE has some weird bugs, XFCE is unusable, I don't know how anyone can stomach it for more than 3 minutes.

    Manjaro, like any other Arch based distro, breaks if you enable AUR, the Mandriva offspring have so many bugs they barely function, Fedora requires a lot of landholding to get it to where you want but it's one of the better offerings, if you don't mind the usual Linux issues, OpenSuse may be the best offering out there but it's installer is such a mess.

    Then you have the idiotic politics like was is going on with Red Hat and all the clones that want to steal Red Hat's work and sell it as their own.

    Let's not forget the bugs that take decades to find and fix, like the X11 bug that took 35 years to fix, the Gnome memory leak that took 10 years, the WINE bug that took 13 years or the curl bug that took 2 years.

    Let's face it, there's a reason why they give Linux based distros away for free, it's because that is all they are worth.

    If Fedora, Ubuntu, SUSE, Debian, Arch and the rest said that the next release would follow a Windows style EULA, where you have to spend $150 for a license that allows you on install on one computer, and they were going to enforce it with activation, would anyone use Linux?

    Or if Microsoft said that starting with Windows 12, it is legally free, you can download it and install it on as many computers as you want, no activation and they will make it open source released under an MIT license, who would actually pick a Linux distro over Windows?
    Haha cool, i remember those athlon cpu's, the one i used SuSe 8.2 on had an Intel Pentium 3 @ 500Mhz! The graphics card used was Voodoo 3 and i think it had an 8GB harddrive when it was brand new! It came delivered with Windows 98 but during the years i upgraded to Windows XP and then later to SuSe 8.2.. it worked great to use for hosting games, websites, ventrillo, mostly for personal usage.. i even had my own website on it!
    Quote Quote  
  7. Mr. Computer Geek dannyboy48888's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Search Comp PM
    Been hopping around since 1998. At the end of the day I been in debain for the past 5 years. It's stable, has offline repo abilities and most programs Linux wise have a deb file. For newer stuff I just downloaded the deb source and build it for current stable install. Don't "hate" windows just Linux has matured to a point I don't use it no more. For my video encoding I use a mix of Linux native and avisynth via wine.
    if all else fails read the manual
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by sophisticles View Post
    ... Windows OSes tend to be way more stable than any Linux distro I have ever tried, and I am sure that I have tried distros most people have never heard of.
    There's some truth to that but not nearly as much as there used to be, certainly with with win10 and win11. I've seen a lot of new users installing Linux because windows 10/11 broke with their hardware. I'm not sure that's the best reason to use Linux because my reaction to that was, jeez, Windows is becoming like Linux now?

    RHEL and Debian Stable are actually very stable. esp. Red Hat. Good if you don't always want the newest versions of everything. I use MX, which is Debian Stable based. There's a reason those two pretty much rule in enterprise, Red Hat more so.

    I'm not sure that having tried a bunch of distros that few have heard of is such a good thing. All Linux distros are built from the same components from mostly the same places so they aren't really all that different under the hood, and most Linux distros are garbage because their support is so poor. That's the most important thing and very few distros have good user support.

    With Windows, you usually have to pull people away from the version they are using kicking and screaming to them to try an updated version...
    I've seen that plenty of times with Linux users, and I'd much rather run an EOL Linux release than an EOL Windows one. Much safer.

    With Linux based OSes, I find myself jumping from one distro to another, because every one that I have found has some bugs that result in instability or odd behavior.
    And Windows never does that?

    Ubuntu used to be a very stable offering, but the newer releases are garbage ...
    There's some truth to that too. Ubuntu 14.04 was great but as I remember that was also when they started using non LTS kernels in LTS releases. Which means they have to do all the backports themselves, and they don't really have the resources to do that IMO. I think they've been going downhill ever since.

    Let's face it, there's a reason why they give Linux based distros away for free, it's because that is all they are worth.
    RHEL is actually pretty successful in the business world. Not a coincidence that RHEL is also the most stable. Unless you're doing embedded systems I think you'd be nuts to use a rolling release like Arch or especially Gentoo in a business.

    Here are a couple of articles by the same person that do a pretty good job of explaining what's wrong with Windows and Linux. I agree with most all he says. Myself I find the list of Linux problems longer than that for Windows, but I find the Windows problems more disturbing:

    https://itvision.altervista.org/why-windows-11-sucks.html
    https://itvision.altervista.org/why.linux.is.not.ready.for.the.desktop.current.html

    I have no Windows installed and I don't particularly want it. While, as I said before, I would never recommend Linux for serious pro level multimedia work, it does what I want to do. And I do not miss that yucky feeling of having to do AV scans regularly either.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Originally Posted by DeJay View Post
    I came to MX via a brief stay with Linux Mint, but I dislike Ubuntu and wasn't happy at having it in the mix. I liked LMDE, but it failed at one particular task and, as I couldn't find a way round it, it had to go. I keep telling myself it doesn't matter what the distro is called or what it is derived from as long as it does what I ask of it, but I obviously don't listen too well! I don't want my OS to be a hobby, I want to use it for my other hobbies and the necessities, so the last failure made me grit my teeth and get out whatever it took. It was much easier than I feared. I quite like MX, I'm getting used to it, so far it does everything I ask of it and I think I will stay with it.
    There are a few similarities to me here; for me too, the machine is primarily a tool and not the purpose of life. I want to be as free as possible, without the ever-observable dependence on a specific distro software that dictates how I manage my mass storage or forces a design on me that I actually don't want. I don't want to be the constant victim of systemd because it always interferes everywhere and tells me how to make my settings. I hate window managers like Cinnamon, which cause more problems than they can solve. I want to be able to choose which system interface is installed and which is not. A slimmer installation is always better than one that is crammed full of applications that I don't need or even dislike. I also want to enjoy the freedom to delete what I don't want without the constraints of fixed applications that are difficult or impossible to remove. I also like a cyclical update process better than a constant rain of individual security updates, which in most cases are not even necessary.

    One of the main reasons for the change is the lack of willingness to provide assistance in various forums, where some discussants believe they have to force their stupid ideas on others, although it often turns out how limitlessly incompetent they are. It also makes no sense to be taught about things that you already know. For me, the direct contact with the developers was one of the most important reasons for the change. You canít expect more competence!

    (Aside from that, I don't care about people who know nothing better than to discourage someone from doing something creative for themselves.)
    Last edited by MicroMagic; 14th Nov 2023 at 05:37.
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    [QUOTE=MicroMagic;2712250]
    Originally Posted by DeJay View Post
    ... I want to be as free as possible, without the ever-observable dependence on a specific distro software that dictates how I manage my mass storage or forces a design on me that I actually don't want....
    There's a flip side to that freedom that potential users should know about. In Windows it tells you that you're the Administrator. You may believe it but you aren't. MS is. Whereas in Linux you really are the administrator. If you have the right password, the OS will assume you know exactly what you're doing, and will willingly trash the OS if you don't. That entails a certain amount of responsibility and a learning curve that not all are prepared to tackle. It is most certainly not a free version of Windows but many newbies seem to think it is.

    I don't want to be the constant victim of systemd because it always interferes everywhere and tells me how to make my settings...
    I use MX too, which doesn't use systemd by default, though it comes with systemd and you can use it if you like. I don't boot with it because it's lighter that way, though I've seen a number of users on the MX forum report they've booted with it and couldn't tell the difference. ALso, compared to sysVinit (I would not use runit), systemd is more geared to multiuser environments.

    But I've used distros that used systemd and I wasn't a victim of any sort. It doesn't tell you how to make your settings any more than sysVinit does.

    Also, systemd is where the support is going now. sysVinit has basically been abandonware for years now.

    I hate window managers like Cinnamon, which cause more problems than they can solve..
    I don't like Cinnamon either. I think it's all style and little substance. But while you may have had issues there it doesn't cause more problems than it solves, and anyway, it isn't a window manager. It's a full desktop environment in which the WM is a component.

    I also want to enjoy the freedom to delete what I don't want without the constraints of fixed applications that are difficult or impossible to remove...
    That's true. It's amazingly hard to completely uninstall any Windows program of any size and complexity. I know a guy locally who does Unix/Linux/Windows support and he removed Norton from his son's box. By hand, registry tools aren't reliable. It took him houirs to remove completely, and he knows what he's doing. In Linux it'd be sudo apt purge <appname> && sudo apt autoremove in the terminal. That's it.

    I also like a cyclical update process better than a constant rain of individual security updates, which in most cases are not even necessary.
    ??? Are you talking about updates or upgrades? You get a ton of updates in Linux. It's one of the most common complaints from new users who are used to Windows. Depends on the distro and how conservative they are with their sources though. MX is Debian Stable based and you don;'t get all that many. With a rolling release like Arch (which is, yes, a lot less stable) you'll get them all the time.

    One of the main reasons you get more updates in Linux, though, is that system updates also update all your app software too, as long as you installed it using the standard packaging system. This is actually a big Linux security feature.

    One of the main reasons for the change is the lack of willingness to provide assistance in various forums, where some discussants believe they have to force their stupid ideas on others, although it often turns out how limitlessly incompetent they are... For me, the direct contact with the developers was one of the most important reasons for the change...
    Most Linux user forums suck, period. The MX user forum is very good for a smaller distro. However, while you do get a bunch of MX devs participating in that forum, that is not true of Linux distros in general. It's unusual.

    User support is everything in Linux, esp for new users, and for that reason the distros I always recommend to newbies are Ubuntu and Mint. The UBuntu forums have a much higher level of expertise but they're still beginner friendly. It's generally easier to get questions answered in the Mint forum but in ubuntuforums (or askubuntu, which has ranking) you're more likely to get the correct answer.

    Which brings up another thing. MX is Debian based, and the average level of expertise in Debian, like Arch, is quite high. They don't hold your hand if you're a beginner. However, I've never asked anything in the MX forums. I haven't had a lot of issues and for those I just searched the Debian forum. If you know what to search for it's great because the level of expertise means you don't have to wade through pages and pages that never get anywhere.

    I found the Mint forums bad that way, though I've seen worse (Zorin eg). They have a distinct lack of expertise there and a lot of posers who I'm pretty sure were flamed off of better forums offering stupid answers. i used Mint for a few years and actually got the vast majority of my useful support info from ubuntuforums or askubuntu.

    One thing new users need to realize about Linux, though, is that unless you get a Red Hat site license, none of the users there are being paid to be there. They're all volunteers. So no one has any obligation to you at all. You can't expect answers so you may need to do some searching yourself.

    You also don't want to come off like an a-hole. I've done tech support and anyone who has knows that there are some customers who you would have to be paid to support. You do not want to be one of them on Linux forums.
    Quote Quote  
  11. I dumped Windows not long after I built a new PC early this year. I tried quite a few Linux distros but the only one I liked that also came with correctly working video drivers for the AMD integrated graphics was MX Linux (ahs version).

    Being totally new to Linux I was completely unprepared for dependency hell when I tried to install newer versions of programs, or programs that aren't in the repo. I was mainly wanting to install VapourSynth but in the end I gave up. Since I've upgraded to MX-23, I haven't had any dependency problems, although I wish I knew then what I know now, as I wasted a lot of time trying to install software on MX-21 instead of waiting for MX-23.

    I also spent a fair bit of time messing around with WINE, trying to get the Windows programs running that I want to keep (at least for the moment). After upgrading to MX-23 and the latest version of WINE a strange bug appeared that causes the panel to turn grey and no longer display any panel items. It only happens when I run Irfanview in full screen mode, but maybe that's for the best as it prompted me to try the Linux version of XnView. I suspect I'll end up liking it more than IrfanView eventually.

    As I almost always open files from the File Manager, either using the "Open With" or SendTo menus, I had to learn how to create desktop files/shortcuts for WINE programs that also work as SendTo items. Why there isn't a dedicated page on the WINEHQ site explaining how to create them, I have no idea, but I finally managed to get them to work for internal drives. I assume it's something to do with the mount point and WINEPATH needing to convert the file path to Windows-speak, but so far I haven't managed to get SendTo working for Windows programs and files on external drives.

    Avisynth runs perfectly in WINE, so after confirming that I reformatted the Windows drive to use it for storage. Windows 11 can't read or write to ext4 drives anyway, which is monumentally annoying, so now it's installed as a guest OS in VirtualBox... just in case I need it.

    I'm still very much a Linux newbie and there's lots to learn, but I can't imagine going back to Windows again.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 18th Nov 2023 at 11:17.
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Wine is actually rubbish. It's a dumb hack and fails more often than not. And when it works with an app that can easily change after a system update. I always tell new Linux users to keep a bit of Windows until they're damn well sure they don't need it. For serious multimedia users, this will be never. Don't dump Windows for serious media stuff. Linux isn't there and I don't think it'll ever be. I haven't actually had Windows for years but the likes of Handbrake and Avidemux and MakeMKV are fine for me.

    Actually, Windows can read Linux formats like ext4 with the right plugin. Note that the Windows installer can't do this AFAIK.
    Quote Quote  
  13. The only (free) utility I found for reading Linux file formats was "Linux Reader". I can't remember where it came from but it works like an archive manager in a way, as it displays the files on the Linux file system and lets you choose the ones to "extract". It doesn't write files to Linux file systems so it's read-only. Maybe there's a better option, but unless there's something that allows Explorer to work normally with other file formats.... well there is one way to ensure Windows can read and write to Linux file systems, by installing it in VirtualBox.....

    WINE is no doubt a bit hit and miss, although probably more so when running a 64 bit Wine prefix than a 32 bit one, and I doubt I'd want to run any "complicated" software that way, but the programs I wanted to keep are working (running in 64 bit Wine). At the moment I have the following installed:

    Avisynth
    AnotherGUI (mainly for batch encoding Avisynth scripts)
    AVI_Mux GUI
    AvsPmod
    foobar2000
    gMKVExtractGUI
    Irfanview (soon to be uninstalled)
    MediaInfo (for MKVToolNix)
    MeGUI
    MKVToolNix (gMKVExtractGUI requires it)
    mp3DirectCut
    MP3Tag
    MPC-BE
    MPC-HC
    NotePad++
    SubtitleEdit
    TSMuxer
    VirtualDub2
    And a variety of command-line audio and video encoders.

    I only installed MPC-HC/BE as a way to easily find frame numbers when splitting video files with MKVToolnix. SMPlayer doesn't seem to display them and you can only navigate to a specific point in a video by entering a time. MPC-HC/BE only work well when they're using the MPC Renderer, and I couldn't get hardware decoding to work, but I don't use either for watching video so it doesn't matter. I initially installed VirtualDub2 for the same reason (before I'd installed MPC-HC/BE) but it runs normally so I'll keep it in case it comes in handy.

    There appears to be Linux versions of more serious non-linear video editors, but I haven't got around to trying any yet. Openshot looks quite good and can be installed via the MX Package installer. DaVinci Resolve comes in MacOS and Linux flavours, and I couldn't see anything on their website to indicate the Windows version is any better (or different), but I haven't used it so I don't know for sure.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 19th Nov 2023 at 02:54.
    Quote Quote  
  14. Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    England
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Wine is actually rubbish.
    I have to agree. A better way to use Windows software on a LInux distro is to use Virtualbox, install Windows as a guest, then install the software on Windows. It works for me and has for years. I have Windows 7, isolated from the network so no nags about updates etc., to occasionally run a couple of video scoring applications for which there is no Linux alternative. Windows is started and run from within Linux. If it is necessary to download something for Windows, something I haven't done for many moons, it can be downloaded by Linux then transferred to Windows via a shared folder.
    Quote Quote  
  15. VirtualBox isn't always the best way to run Windows programs. It really depends on the program, and of course whether or not it'll run in Wine.
    As an example, if I want to extract a stream from an MKV, I can right click on the MKV and use the SendTo menu to open it in gMKVExtractGUI, then simply select the stream and extract.
    gMKVExtractGUI runs perfectly in Wine, so it doesn't make sense to fire up a whole OS for such a simple task.

    Thinking about it, the gMKVExtractGUI author fully supports running it via Mono, so Wine isn't actually necessary for that one on Linux.
    The author of SubtitleEdit says it runs (mostly) well via Mono too, although I haven't experienced any of the minor issues mentioned on the SubtitleEdit website while running it in Wine with dot net installed.

    There's also the extra overhead that comes from running a guest OS in VirtualBox. Just to see, I ran a test encode on a 1080p video a while ago using Avisynth and x264 (slower settings than the x264 defaults). There was no filtering in the script. Using Wine the encode progressed at roughly 60fps. When I encoded the same video with the same x264 settings on Windows 11 running in VirtualBox, the speed dropped by at least 15fps. I say "at least" because I think it was a little more, but it was a while ago and I can't remember exactly.
    Last edited by hello_hello; 19th Nov 2023 at 11:35.
    Quote Quote  
  16. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Run mediainfo and mkvtoolnix in Wine? Why? There are Linux ports of both. They work fine.
    Quote Quote  
  17. gMKVExtractGUI requires MKVToolNix to work, so I figured it was probably simpler to put the Windows version of MKVToolNix in the same Wine configuration, rather than use a native Linux version, which I do have installed.
    MKVToolNixGUI can open MediaInfo to display info about MKV streams, so while I was at it I added MediaInfo too, but once again I use the native Linux version myself.
    I used portable versions for the Wine configuration, so it wasn't hard to just unzip and copy them to the Program Files folder.
    Quote Quote  
  18. Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Wine is actually rubbish. It's a dumb hack and fails more often than not. And when it works with an app that can easily change after a system update. I always tell new Linux users to keep a bit of Windows until they're damn well sure they don't need it. For serious multimedia users, this will be never. Don't dump Windows for serious media stuff. Linux isn't there and I don't think it'll ever be. I haven't actually had Windows for years but the likes of Handbrake and Avidemux and MakeMKV are fine for me.

    Actually, Windows can read Linux formats like ext4 with the right plugin. Note that the Windows installer can't do this AFAIK.
    I agree with you 100%. I have been using Linux since Win 2k first came out and i set up my first dual boot.

    The reality is that you can't dump Windows completely. For all the criticism Windows gets, the DX API is top notch, MS Office has no true open source rival, .NET allows developers to make great apps with VB and C# real fast, the HAL allows Windows to be able to run an any hardware and in many ways Windows is more robust and stable than any Linux based OS.
    Quote Quote  
  19. Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    There appears to be Linux versions of more serious non-linear video editors, but I haven't got around to trying any yet. Openshot looks quite good and can be installed via the MX Package installer. DaVinci Resolve comes in MacOS and Linux flavours, and I couldn't see anything on their website to indicate the Windows version is any better (or different), but I haven't used it so I don't know for sure.
    As recently as Resolve 16, there were differences between the Windows, Linux and Mac versions, with Linux supporting the least features, such as the lack of integration with Black Magic's panels and decks,

    I can tell you that getting resolve to work on Linux is nearly a non-starter, it only works with certain distros and certain video cards.

    I have only ever gotten it working with Ubuntu and an Nvidia video card with the proprietary drivers.

    In fact I am almost certain I once saw an error message when trying to run it with integrated Intel graphics that it was not supported.

    Windows has no such limitation.
    Quote Quote  
  20. Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Actually, Windows can read Linux formats like ext4 with the right plugin. Note that the Windows installer can't do this AFAIK.
    Not a plug-in per se, but there are tools that will let you access Linux partitions from with Windows.

    I don't recommend doing that, or accessing ntfs from within Linux.

    If interoperability is desired, i use exfat, which is well supported by both and I have never seen data corruption caused by either Windows or Linux when using it.

    On the other hand, i have seen Linux mess up a ntfs partition and Windows mess up an ext4 partition.
    Quote Quote  
  21. I have quite a few HDDs formatted as NTFS, a few of them formatted with MX Linux. I use them for storing video files as the hardware players here can read NTFS drives (they're internal drives used in USB docks). I'm not sure about exfat as I haven't had a need to consider it before. After 8 months of moving files around though, I'm yet to experience a problem.
    Quote Quote  
  22. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by sophisticles View Post
    Originally Posted by hello_hello View Post
    There appears to be Linux versions of more serious non-linear video editors, but I haven't got around to trying any yet. Openshot looks quite good and can be installed via the MX Package installer. DaVinci Resolve comes in MacOS and Linux flavours, and I couldn't see anything on their website to indicate the Windows version is any better (or different), but I haven't used it so I don't know for sure.
    As recently as Resolve 16, there were differences between the Windows, Linux and Mac versions, with Linux supporting the least features, such as the lack of integration with Black Magic's panels and decks,

    I can tell you that getting resolve to work on Linux is nearly a non-starter, it only works with certain distros and certain video cards.

    I have only ever gotten it working with Ubuntu and an Nvidia video card with the proprietary drivers.

    In fact I am almost certain I once saw an error message when trying to run it with integrated Intel graphics that it was not supported.

    Windows has no such limitation.
    I have not tried DaVinci Resolve but from what I've read on Linux support forums I have to agree. It just looks like a bucket of worms. I'm not sure what they mean when they say it's Linux compatible. Apparently they only test it with OpenSUSE.

    The flip side of that is that most of the users I see trying to install it just don't need that level of functionality. They don't even seem to know what sort of editing they want to do, which to me is a dead giveaway that they'd be a lot better off with something simpler.

    It seems to be real pro level software AFAIK but real pros just aren't going to be using Linux anyway. And having pro level video editing software doesn't make you a pro editor any more than owning pro accounting software makes you an accountant.
    Quote Quote  
  23. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Search Comp PM
    [QUOTE=sophisticles;2713367]
    Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Actually, Windows can read Linux formats like ext4 with the right plugin. Note that the Windows installer can't do this AFAIK.
    Not a plug-in per se, but there are tools that will let you access Linux partitions from with Windows.

    I don't recommend doing that, or accessing ntfs from within Linux....
    [/QUOTE

    You may be right about the Windows ext4 plugins. MS is moving towards Linux support so they should be OK though IMO.

    You're definitely right about using NTFS in Linux. While reading and writing files to ntfs from Linux is fine IMO, doing anything deeper like file system repair can be trouble. The NTFS system has a number of those undocumented 'features' that MS is so find of. So Linux ntfs tools just aren't reliable.

    I haven't had Windows installed for years so I format all my external drives to ext4. When they were still ntfs and I had to fix them couple of times I used Hiren's Boot Disc. You can get UEFI and legacy versions. There just isn't any Linux equivalent for chkdsk.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads

Visit our sponsor! Try DVDFab and backup Blu-rays!