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  1. Member
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    Hi, I have an anime batch (12 episodes) ripped from Blu-ray boxes, HEVC-encoded, and each of the episodes are around 1,9-2,0 GBs.
    I'd like to burn them onto 8GB DVD discs but I'm pretty confused about the recommended disc count, software and settings to do it
    Can someone help me about it?
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    Originally Posted by iruhamu03 View Post
    Hi, I have an anime batch (12 episodes) ripped from Blu-ray boxes, HEVC-encoded, and each of the episodes are around 1,9-2,0 GBs.
    I'd like to burn them onto 8GB DVD discs but I'm pretty confused about the recommended disc count, software and settings to do it
    Can someone help me about it?
    to burn the disc use imgburn.
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  3. You're question is too vague. Are you looking to make standard definition movie DVDs that any DVD player can play? Or are you just looking to store your files on a data DVDs (which some DVD or Blu-ray players might be able play)?
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    You're question is too vague. Are you looking to make standard definition movie DVDs that any DVD player can play? Or are you just looking to store your files on a data DVDs (which some DVD or Blu-ray players might be able play)?
    I'm trying to make SD DVD series from a 12 episoded TV series. Each of the episodes are 24 minutes and I want it to be playable in any DVD player
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    All the episodes will need to be re-encoded to conform to the DVD spec's requirements for video and audio. DVD subtitles will also need to be created if you want them. The video, audio, and subtitles (if any) will need to be authored, which means the audio, video, and subtitles need to be multiplexed, then placed into the file and folder structure used for DVD.

    AVStoDVD may be able to do most of the above for you (or perhaps all of it if you have SRT subs). Have AVStoDVD output a DVD ISO. After you test the ISO image with VLC to make certain that it's OK, Imgburn can be used to burn the files and folders you create with AVStoDVD to DVD media.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
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  6. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Why not just play the original blu-rays on your tv?
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  7. Member hech54's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by johns0 View Post
    Why not just play the original blu-rays on your tv?
    He He. Gets them every time.
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  8. Member
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    Originally Posted by johns0 View Post
    Why not just play the original blu-rays on your tv?
    Yes, that would be an easier solution than converting HEVC VIDEO files ripped from Blu-rays and burning them to DVD. There are also recent HDTVs that can play HEVC video up to 1080p stored on a USB stick via their USB port.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
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