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  1. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Not VR per se (as in anything gaming), so not sure if this is the best section for this ?

    I have a decent collection of 3D glasses, but none for this particular format. (Or, are there more than one variant of SBS ?) I don't think any of the ones I have are likely to work. Don't know whether there is any conversion software to turn SBS into other 3D formats ? The SBS seems to be a pain to deal with, but I have acquired a couple movies that came that way. In a prior thread, someone suggested a procedure for cropping / doing away with one side of the SBS. This was clunky, and it more or less worked, but then say bye-bye to the 3D viewing. There has been a variety of 3D glasses for sale on eBay, but practically none that mention supporting the SBS format. Will also check at Amazon. So, what do you recommend ? (Preferably with links.) I think I might as well add one to the collection. A better quality choice would be preferred. This is for viewing on a regular, plasma, non-3D tv, btw.
    When in Las Vegas, don't miss the Pinball Hall of Fame Museum http://www.pinballmuseum.org/ -- with over 150 tables from 6+ decades of this quintessentially American art form.
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  2. There are no glasses for SBS viewing AFAIK. It's your 3D TV which should convert the SBS to 'normal' 3D format which one can view with the standard glasses. Check out the settings of your TV. Any 3D TV should have this option. If it is not capable to convert the SBS you will have to reencode to convert it to the "standard" 3D MVC format. Not so easy, but may be possible with some manual work, I think. Take a look here:
    https://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=169651
    https://sites.google.com/site/videofan3d/software/frim-encoder?authuser=0

    To convert it to 2D one would probably have to crop the left or right half of the frame, resize the remaining half to full width using Avisynth for example, and reencode.

    Maybe somone else has a better proposal.
    Last edited by Sharc; 23rd Jun 2022 at 15:03. Reason: Links added
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  3. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    There are only 3 main types of 3D glasses - Active (alternating shuttered LCD, synced to alternating L/R of the "active" double-framerate 3DTV), Passive (Polarized clockwise/counterclockwise, matching the alternate line or checkerboard FPR layers in a "passive" 3DTV), or Anaglyph (Red/Cyan or Yellow/Blue or Green/Magenta, matching the color blended L/R or R/L of the premixed image on a 2D TV)

    The SBS storage format has to be translated into one of those (TV) display formats, either by using a 3DTV that supports local playback via embedded media player, or by using a computer app that will convert. My former preference was "Stereoscopic Player", but it is a tiered freeware/shareware/payware app. IIRC, you could use bino or a few of the other better opensource apps which have 3D capability.

    If it CAN convert, it should likely be as "HDMI Frame-Packed" format, as that is what will AUTOMATICALLY engage a 3DTV into proper 3D mode. If not F.P., there is an SBS and a TAB HDMI 3D format (and a few more more exotic ones), but you must then MANUALLY engage the 3D on the TV, and choose the proper format from among the short list of options.
    If it CANNOT convert, you will HAVE to do the manual engagement thing.

    However, if you are using a 2D TV, the only main suggestions I have for you is one of 2 ways:

    1. using one of those players, convert to Anaglyph (Red/Cyan is the most common). Then use the corresponding (Red/Cyan?) glasses with any 2D TV.
    2. don't use glasses at all, make sure your sbs is swapped R/L, not L/R, and then cross your eyes! Not great in the long term ( ), but it does work, I kid you not.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 23rd Jun 2022 at 17:12.
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  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    2. don't use glasses at all, make sure your sbs is swapped R/L, not L/R, and then cross your eyes! Not great in the long term ( ), but it does work, I kid you not.

    Scott
    LOL. cross your eyes for an entire 2 hour movie and be blind for days... how about over under??? tilt your head 90 degrees and cross your eyes?
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  5. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    There are only 3 main types of 3D glasses - Active (alternating shuttered LCD, synced to alternating L/R of the "active" double-framerate 3DTV), Passive (Polarized clockwise/counterclockwise, matching the alternate line or checkerboard FPR layers in a "passive" 3DTV), or Anaglyph (Red/Cyan or Yellow/Blue or Green/Magenta, matching the color blended L/R or R/L of the premixed image on a 2D TV)

    The SBS storage format has to be translated into one of those (TV) display formats, either by using a 3DTV that supports local playback via embedded media player, or by using a computer app that will convert. My former preference was "Stereoscopic Player", but it is a tiered freeware/shareware/payware app. IIRC, you could use bino or a few of the other better opensource apps which have 3D capability.

    If it CAN convert, it should likely be as "HDMI Frame-Packed" format, as that is what will AUTOMATICALLY engage a 3DTV into proper 3D mode. If not F.P., there is an SBS and a TAB HDMI 3D format (and a few more more exotic ones), but you must then MANUALLY engage the 3D on the TV, and choose the proper format from among the short list of options.
    If it CANNOT convert, you will HAVE to do the manual engagement thing.

    However, if you are using a 2D TV, the only main suggestions I have for you is one of 2 ways:

    1. using one of those players, convert to Anaglyph (Red/Cyan is the most common). Then use the corresponding (Red/Cyan?) glasses with any 2D TV.
    2. don't use glasses at all, make sure your sbs is swapped R/L, not L/R, and then cross your eyes! Not great in the long term ( ), but it does work, I kid you not.

    Scott
    Thanks for that short course in 3D. But it doesn't sound like there is an appealing, not extra-troublesome option for me. My tv is what it is, and I don't really want to watch this some way -- with software playback intervention -- on my computer monitor. (Unless there is some Android TV app that could go onto my Nvidia Shield and handle this . . . .?) So, I may just have to scare up some "ordinary" version of said movie(s) to view instead. It may not be any great loss.
    When in Las Vegas, don't miss the Pinball Hall of Fame Museum http://www.pinballmuseum.org/ -- with over 150 tables from 6+ decades of this quintessentially American art form.
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    From my android phone, Google Play Store has sview (photos & video, but not a lot of format output options) and 3dsteroid/pro (lots of features & options, but I think only works with photos).

    Otherwise, probably better to convert to monoscopic 2d, or just find a normal mono 2d version and avoid re-encoding.


    Scott
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  7. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    So, SBS 3D format was strictly a creature of some 3D smart TVs ? Ones that came with their own particular viewing glasses or headset visors ? I never noticed much other evidence of its adoption or usage in the general market.
    When in Las Vegas, don't miss the Pinball Hall of Fame Museum http://www.pinballmuseum.org/ -- with over 150 tables from 6+ decades of this quintessentially American art form.
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  8. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    It is a creature of latter day storage of legacy-compatible 3D, particularly focused on computers & trading/sharing. It was not necessarily tied to 3DTVs, which it predated by a decade or so. (I think it also is reminiscent of the old stereopticon photos, so that may have been a natural physical to digital progression).

    In a world of 2D full color, anaglyph is passť, even though there is no issue using them on 2D displays, so SBS and TAB, particularly their 1/2 rez forms, have taken its place. Full sbs in particular with R/L orientation is also quite popular due to being able to do the cross-eyed thing.

    However, none of the 3D formats, except MVC and M2TS/SSIF and FramePacking, and possibly a few rare forms of mpeg framecropping flagged types, are totally backwards compatible. In the sense that if the 3D is shown on a 2D only display it automatically shows only and cleanly in 2D, and those are designed to be only reasonably more bandwidth when stored. And there are still equivocations and caveats with those. Forward and Backward compatibility has been one of the bigger hurdles with S3D, along with a common format base, reliance on glasses, screen dimming, and ultimately the quality of the production. (IMO, so many lazy 2D->3D conversion is a huge contributer to lackluster enjoyment of that element of the films).

    Should 3D come back to popularity, my guess is that it will do so using more holographic-like displays needing no glasses, but supporting full 2D backward compatibility.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 26th Jun 2022 at 17:39.
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