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  1. Not sure if this belongs in this thread, but I'm just wondering if connecting Betamax (in my case a Sanyo Betacord) recorder to laptop's USB (using my capture device that I use when capturing VHS tapes) will work using a BNC connector to composite connection?. The reason I ask is that when I've been capturing my VHS tapes from my VHS recorder, it seems that (for some reason) the only method of connecting the machine to my laptop and getting a signal, is via the scart lead which is connected to the red, yellow and white cables which then connect to the USB capture device. For some reason using just the three cables won't receive a signal coming from the VCR, and I'm assuming this will be same when capturing from the Beta machine. I'm guessing the reason is because you need to switch the signal from input to output so that the capturing programme can detect the signal.
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  2. This is not about a laptop or USB. This is about connecting your Betamax to whatever capturing device you use. What do connectivity diagrams from the user manuals for both of your devices show?
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  3. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Short answer. No.

    Longer answer.....


    I seriously doubt that your UK Betamax vcr has DNC connectors. But you might just have confused the terminology with basic RF aerial cables. Now theoretically you can get a RF to composite cable but, again, I suspect that cable will only carry the video signal. So unless you like silent movies.....


    And Sanyo Betacord could mean anything. Maybe you no longer have the instruction manual so do tell the exact model number of the unit. Then at least we can, hopefully, tell you how to proceed.
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  4. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    Most non Sony low end Beta VCR's of the era have a mono audio line output and one composite output in a shape of a BNC connector and another set for input, they should be labeled accordingly, Unless your model is different from what I've seen. The right way of troubleshooting video connections is using a TV, using a capture device adds layers of complexity and will be impossible to troubleshoot.
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    I have used a BNC>RCA adapter in the past and it worked well. I'm pretty sure I used it for video and audio; I can't recall what machine it was, maybe an early model Panasonic? It may even have been a Beta VCR.

    https://www.cablechick.com.au/cables/rca-female-to-bnc-male-adaptor.html?gclid=CjwKCAj...BoCUd4QAvD_BwE
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  6. Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    I seriously doubt that your UK Betamax vcr has DNC connectors.
    If you mean BNC, that's what most PAL betamax vcrs had for the video output. (Also not uncommon on early VHS decks). If it's the early VTC-9300 OP has that in particular had another odd type of connector so might require a special adapter/cable. Otherwise BNC->rca adapter is what you want.
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  7. Member DB83's Avatar
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    My bad. DNC was a typo.

    Even so, and still being a minority of one, it has always been my understanding that BNC are plug-in and twist to lock in place. Early UK vcrs simply had RF(aerial) only plug-in (no twist and no lock) for input and RF for output. Not even scart (as in the case of my Sony C5*). Now RF has been superceded by BNC which is the standard for satellite incoming. Which makes me wonder if the OP is simply confused and mixes up the terminology.


    He might respond (but do not hold your breath since he does have 'form' for lack of feedback in his topics)


    *Having said that I have come across an image of additional video and audio input/output on this model. Whether that classed as BNC I know not. But even then video and audio were separate.
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    Post deleted, not really appropriate.
    Last edited by Alwyn; 27th May 2022 at 19:49.
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  9. The composite in/out on my SL-C5 is a standard BNC at least, additionally it has the standard European coax RF aerial connectors (seems the actual name is Belling-Lee connector, and it's different to the screw-in type/F-connector more used in the US), and a 12-pin sony camera connector. I haven't used betamax much otherwise, but at least from pictures/google it seems BNC is what's used for composite video on most other PAL betamax decks too, while the audio in/out is a phono/rca plug. (The Sanyo VTC-9300 being an exception as noted, and think there's one or two models that came with SCART.) Maybe we would have seen more decks with scart and/or rca composite if the format had lasted longer in Europe.
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  10. It's OK now as I managed to sort it out. For the last few years (yes I know lol) I've been trying to get the machine to work, and only yesterday I tried to move the reel motor with the belt around which moved the idler away from the tape, then I tried a tape and pressed rewind, and it started to rewind and play. I think the problem must've been down to the stiff idler or motor or the belts a little worn. As for the connection, I decided to use the RF lead from the back of the Sanyo and into the back of my old 14" CRT TV and pressed autotune. I then used a scart to composite cable which connected to the USB capture device so that I could get a signal to the laptop as I haven't yet got a BNC connector. For the audio I simply used a separate audio comp wire from the back of the VCR and then connected that to the comp wire which connected to the capture device, otherwise I would've got video only. Bit of a faff but it works. Quite alot of the tapes are almost 40 years old and are in far better condition than alot of my more recent VHS tapes from the late 90s and early 2000s, and those simple cardboard boxes the blank tapes came in seem to be much better made than the ones used for VHS blank tapes. Pity Betamax lost in the format wars as I prefer the more compact, smaller size cassettes than the more bulky VHS tape. I think had they been successful they could've improved on the format over time.
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  11. Originally Posted by techmot View Post
    Pity Betamax lost in the format wars as I prefer the more compact, smaller size cassettes than the more bulky VHS tape. I think had they been successful they could've improved on the format over time.
    They did.

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