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  1. I have a CD-video, there are seroustly playback problems spickless and sound very distorten, but don't see any laserot. The disk looks very good.
    Disk is balavoine Sauver L'amour
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    Definitely visible, but not always: https://www.google.com/search?q=laserrot&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CTa2nZvG0uLJYX3oC0Ud7wWisgI...=1583&bih=1085 I've had LDs that had issues but no visible damage.

    Like all CDs, CD-Video is more prone to physical damage because there's no protective top polycarbonate layer. The read layer is directly below the top label/printing. Hold your disc up to a strong light and look for any pinhole specks of light or discoloration.
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  3. Problem of the CD-Video is that all the audio tracks sound excellent, But the video the sound is completely distorted/stuck after 1-2 minutes. I can't hear the music.
    But the sound is stored digitally, so that ask me the question, where is the audio from the video stored? in the audio CD layer or the Laserdisc layer?
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    It's part of the LD portion. The disc is a hybrid LD/CD.

    It also contains up to 5 minutes of LaserDisc video information with digital CD-quality sound, which can be played back on a newer LaserDisc player capable of playing CD-V discs or CD-V-only players.[1]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD_Video
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  5. I can't understand you you can store Digital sound in a layer actually is intended to store analog material.
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    A standard home video LaserDisc is 30 cm (12 in) in diameter and made up of two single-sided aluminum discs layered in plastic. Although similar in appearance to compact discs or DVDs, early LaserDiscs used analog video stored in the composite domain (having a video bandwidth and resolution approximately equivalent to the 1-inch (25 mm) Type C videotape format) with analog FM stereo sound and PCM digital audio.

    Edit: Sound could be stored in either analog or digital format and in a variety of surround sound formats; NTSC discs could carry a stereo analog audio track, plus a stereo CD-quality uncompressed PCM digital audio track, which were (EFM, CIRC, 16-bit and 44.1 kHz sample rate).[21] PAL discs could carry one pair of audio tracks, either analog or digital and the digital tracks on a PAL disc were 16-bit 44.1 kHz as on a CD; in the UK, the term "LaserVision" is used to refer to discs with analog sound, while "LaserDisc" is used for those with digital audio. The digital sound signal in both formats are EFM-encoded as in CD.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaserDisc

    CD-Video wasn't recording in layers like DL DVD. Part of the disc was used for LD and other portion used for CD audio next to each other. The same is true for other hybrid CDs.

    Edit: Some early LD players could only play the analog audio track.
    Last edited by lingyi; 7th Mar 2022 at 17:39.
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    Is this about Laserdisc? The large optical platters? If so, lingyi is your guy.

    If about CD, small discs we've used for decades, well...

    Originally Posted by anonymoustly View Post
    I have a CD-video, ..., but don't see any laserot.
    "Laser rot" does not exist on CDs and DVDs. That's a special sort of issue only present on Laserdiscs. Contrary to what some think, or insist, any error found on any disc isn't "rot" or "laser rot" or "disc rot". But there are many other errors on CD, DVD, and Blu-ray, most of them shared.

    Don't bother quoting the "disc rot" Wikipedia at me. Any idiot can change a Wiki entry, and many do. That entry further quotes BS that was disproven decades ago, written by journalists that didn't do their research.

    - Damaging a disc isn't the same as "rot".
    - Marginal burns/presses, combined with marginal quality drives, is also not covered in the wiki.

    CD media has no upper polycarb protection, just a thin layer of goo. Easy to damage, even with a fingernail. That's almost always the issue. Impact damage that cascaded to the dye layer, or the pressed metal alloy.

    Disc doesn't work? It was damaged. Almost always. Pressure, impact, warping. Wallets are often to blame.
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    rot may be a misnomer. but damage to the recording layer of dvds and especially cds can and does occur. mostly starting at the outside edge as the paint/laminates separate. or they have had a bad/corrosive marking pen used on them. i've trashed many discs for the said problem.
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    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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    CD-Video was a hybrid LD and CD originally in 12mm CD size and constructed like any CD without a top layer. It wasn't layered as the OP states, but a portion of it was LD compatible and the rest for was a short CD compatible song. Because it was like any other CD, the top was prone to damage, which is why I asked the OP to hold it up to the light to see if there's any pinhole spots or discolored sections.

    12 cm "CD Video" disc format
    One of the first LaserDisc players that can play CD-V discs is the Pioneer CLD-1010 from 1987. Though it is a CD-based format, CD Video was never given a rainbow book designation; the idea of encoding analogue video, which is incompatible between different regions, was poorly received by CD stakeholders other than Philips, who had not consulted them prior to demonstrating the format to the music industry.[3]

    CD Video discs have a distinctive gold color,[2][4] to differentiate them from regular silver-colored audio CDs. This is a characteristic that would later be replicated in HVD, a more advanced disc format.


    A typical 12 cm CD Video release in its case. This contains three audio tracks and one video by the band Lloyd Cole and the Commotions.
    The physical size of the 12 cm discs limited the amount of LaserDisc content[2] to around six minutes, which meant they were primarily suited to pop music videos.[5] However, both players and discs were too expensive for the youth market likely to be most interested in such content.[2]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD_Video

    It was also later released in 8" and 12" disc sizes. I have one 5" CD-Video disc and had a 8" Karaoke disc. IIRC, the 8" disc wasn't layered like a regular LD because it was much thinner.
    Last edited by lingyi; 8th Mar 2022 at 22:18.
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  10. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    No.

    As I stated, most people are completely clueless about rot or why optical media fails. For example, the images in your random Google link shows everything from mold to damage. Not rot.

    This is one of those instances where people (WRONGLY!) use random jargon to describe anything that is wrong. You may as well say the disc is "broken" or "it pooped itself". Because that would be just as accurate, from a technical perspective.

    Why does jargon matter? Why does accuracy matter? Because that's how you have to troubleshoot, to see what can be done. You need to describe the symptoms (how "not working"), not the prognosis without understanding what that entails (rot).

    In the medical community, "horses not unicorns". Actual disc rot is a unicorn. Horses are damage from misstorage and mishandling.

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    rot may be a misnomer. but damage to the recording layer of dvds and especially cds can and does occur. mostly starting at the outside edge as the paint/laminates separate. or they have had a bad/corrosive marking pen used on them. i've trashed many discs for the said problem.
    Bonding was an issue (STILL NOT ROT!), but I think most of that has since subsided. That was a cost cutting that seems to have backfired in the late 2000s, maybe early 2010s. Mostly with cheap media, fake media. I've not seen much of that in years --- though burning less discs now, more and more folks moving away from discs, even large orgs.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    CD-Video was a hybrid LD and CD
    I know that, you know that, but not sure the OP did. It was never confirmed.
    Last edited by lordsmurf; 9th Mar 2022 at 11:16.
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    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    CD-Video was a hybrid LD and CD
    I know that, you know that, but not sure the OP did. It was never confirmed.
    Hmmm...I assumed (and we all know what that does <GRIN>) that the OP knows because he used the right term and described it correctly, other than the layers.

    As for Laserrot. I stand corrected and humbled as usual before you.

    Laserrot is specifically a condition of LDs because of the bonding of the layers of the disc coming apart. I'm not sure if it's Laserrot or not because it's not visible, but I had high quality Criterion and Japanese discs that suddenly developed speckles typical of Laserrot. My discs were stored in a room that would hit 100+ degrees during the summer and I'm sure that contributed to it.
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  12. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    CD-Video was a hybrid LD and CD
    I know that, you know that, but not sure the OP did. It was never confirmed.
    Hmmm...I assumed (and we all know what that does <GRIN>) that the OP knows because he used the right term and described it correctly, other than the layers.

    As for Laserrot. I stand corrected and humbled as usual before you.

    Laserrot is specifically a condition of LDs because of the bonding of the layers of the disc coming apart. I'm not sure if it's Laserrot or not because it's not visible, but I had high quality Criterion and Japanese discs that suddenly developed speckles typical of Laserrot. My discs were stored in a room that would hit 100+ degrees during the summer and I'm sure that contributed to it.
    "Laser rot" was an accumulation of bad manufacturing, flawed alloys. I actually don't recall bonding coming into play, but it wouldn't surprise me. It was just shoddy LD work, not more, nothing less.

    The same processes don't exist for CDs, DVDs, BDs. Those specific alloys were never again used. Disc construction is different.

    Unfortunately, a lot of this info has been lost, buried beneath BS and nonsense over the decades. It turned into a factually wrong catch-all term for anything that ails a disc. But the problem is it puts the blame on the discs, always. However, it's often user error, with handling or storage. Or environmental, specific to an area, often combined with user error (storing discs outside temps/RH to be used with discs).

    For example, and older somewhat accurate page: https://www.lddb.com/laserrot.php

    Old pet peeve of mine, from the time when Chicken Littles claimed "YOUR DISCS ARE DYING!" (and/or "YOUR TAPES ARE DYING!"). All BS. Long ago shown to be stupidity, poor research, and even a hit job by IBM employees to promote magnetic media over optical. This is where things went sideways, the info got raped and regurgitated. So you have to wade through at least a decade worth of nonsense now.
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