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  1. On the 120 volt models VCRs i always see a F-connector on EU 230 volt models a IEC connector.
    Why is this difference?
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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
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    You sure about that ?

    Now I have no first-hand experience with US power (which would use 120 volts) but sure it is only the pins that differ. Even in the EU the actual pins differ.


    The only F-connector pics I can find refer to video connection and not to actual power.
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  3. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    F connector is an RF video signal connection for off air, cable and satellite signals, It has nothing to do with electric power.

    Here is all power connections used in the US, I would assume Europe uses some of those too.
    Last edited by dellsam34; 2nd Mar 2022 at 14:16.
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  4. Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    F connector is an RF video signal connection for off air, cable and satellite signals, It has nothing to do with electric power.
    Well... all satellite consumer equipment use F connector to provide power for LNB and other equipment connected by F connector so in fact F connector can provide substantial amount of power (capable to power multi LNB, Diseq, actuator etc.)

    I think F connector popularity in US may be related to different approach for signal distribution - Europe is smaller and way higher urbanized than US, some countries doesn't use almost at all stateliness equipent and flimsy IEC connector is sufficient to pass average quality RF UHF signal - in US more satellite equipment and wider consumer penetration of such solutions so simply cable with F connector are common - opposite to IEC.
    Of course F connector is simply better in terms of RF parameters and more robust than IEC.
    Perhaps this can be explained also in additional way (complementary not contrary to what i've wrote previously - however afraid that i can be misunderstood by US people - not my intention to insult anyone) - F connector is more foolproof - way more difficult to accidentally disconnect connection - flimsy IEC have no this kind of protection by design.
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  5. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I can only speak to use in North America (US, Canada, Mexico), but F-connector here is >90% used ONLY for RF payload, not power.
    Most VCRs get power from pre-wired, integrated power cable. Rarely does VCR come with separate, pluggable power jack. But if it did, it would likely be IEC (at least for recent models) or NEMA, like dellsam34 said.


    Scott
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  6. Member DB83's Avatar
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    ^^ Same here, essentially.

    Twas only with later models that one saw a detachable power cord.
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  7. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by pandy View Post
    Well... all satellite consumer equipment use F connector to provide power for LNB and other equipment connected by F connector so in fact F connector can provide substantial amount of power (capable to power multi LNB, Diseq, actuator etc.)
    Yes, it can carry up to 15V DC (12V nominal) enough to trigger a Diseq switch or move a small dish motor, but if you haven't noticed the OP is talking about 120V 230V AC to power up indoor home appliances from the mains.
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  8. Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    Yes, it can carry up to 15V DC (12V nominal) enough to trigger a Diseq switch or move a small dish motor, but if you haven't noticed the OP is talking about 120V 230V AC to power up indoor home appliances from the mains.
    SAT LNB use 18V and current limit is up to 1A at least - and to be honest - i'm not sure what kind of IEC connector OP asks - for me F connector is RF type connector so to be compared it must be compared with IEC RF connector https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belling-Lee_connector - idea that RF connector can be used to deliver something like 120/230VAC is bizarre and against any electrical code or standard - both connectors can't provide sufficient insulation level and safety - based on this OP question is invalid. Personally i used 120V vs 230V as geographical description not real voltages present on the connector...(both connectors mechanically are incapable to provide this kind of voltages in safe way).
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  9. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    It could be a typo, I'm pretty sure the OP is talking about the mains power not a signal connector.
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  10. no you are wrong, i intend to the signal connector.
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  11. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    Read post #3 again. What the voltage and IEC has got to do with the F connector then? If you formulate your questions wrong, you will get wrong answers.

    So what is it you are asking about? Signal connectors or power connectors?
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  12. signal connectors, only use the 230 volt as a reference what devices i intent too.
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  13. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    Are you talking about RF connector for UHF/VHF antenna? In north and Latin America a F connector is used, In the rest of the world a Belling-Lee connector is used, Why? It's just a standard chosen, Here in the US the F connector is used for everything, RF, Cable, Satellite, In other countries they decided to go with the Belling-Lee connector for RF and F connector for everything else, Does it really matter to know why?
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