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  1. Using DVD Fab. MP4 video files, about 3.4 GB and want to put them on a 4.7 GB DVD-R so my mom can watch the videos on here DVD player


    It states I only have room for 5 of the files, which are very small, am I doing something wrong?
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  2. The size of your mp4 files is usually irrelevant when it comes to creating a DVD. Unless they already contain DVD compatible video and audio (rare in an mp4 file) they have to be re-encoded with an MPEG 2 encoder with DVD compatible settings. Since mp4 files usually contain h.264 or h.265 video, which is much more highly compressed than MPEG 2 can deliver, that will usually make them grow substantially. Audio will probably have to be reencoded too, from aac to ac3, which will cause the audio to grow. Look to putting 60 to 90 minutes on a 4.7 GB DVD+/-R if you want good (for DVD) quality. Beyond that will cause a significant loss of quality.
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  3. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    The size of your mp4 files is usually irrelevant when it comes to creating a DVD. Unless they already contain DVD compatible video and audio (rare in an mp4 file) they have to be re-encoded with an MPEG 2 encoder with DVD compatible settings. Since mp4 files usually contain h.264 or h.265 video, which is much more highly compressed than MPEG 2 can deliver, that will usually make them grow substantially. Audio will probably have to be reencoded too, from aac to ac3, which will cause the audio to grow. Look to putting 60 to 90 minutes on a 4.7 GB DVD+/-R if you want good (for DVD) quality. Beyond that will cause a significant loss of quality.
    Thanks appreciate you!

    So no really option to get them smaller and use 1-2 disk right?

    I guess I could put like 3-4 per disk and use 7 disks
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  4. Originally Posted by irishmike View Post
    So no really option to get them smaller and use 1-2 disk right?
    I've never used DVD Fab to make DVDs so I don't know what its capabilities are. But some software lets you specify the bitrate used for the video (and audio). By specifying low bitrates you can put more video on each disc. The problem is that the less bitrate you use the worse the quality will be. That can be mitigated to some extent by using lower resolutions. NTSC DVD supports only four resolutions: 720x480, 704x480, 352x480, and 352x240 (virtually all commercial DVDs are 720x480). If you use one of the lower resolutions you will be trading off resolution to get fewer blocky artifacts. So you can put 8 hours on a DVD at 720x480 but it will look horribly blocky. Or you can put 8 hours at 352x240 and it will look less sharp but also less blocky. Some programs let you "fit to disc" -- they'll automatically adjust the bitrate and resolutions to fit the content you specify.
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  5. Use AvsToDVD to turn your MP4 files into a DVD playable on any DVD player. I believe its default setting is to make a PAL DVD, so if you want NTSC change that. Here's Baldrick's guide for beginners:

    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/353284-AVStoDVD-beginners-guide-Any-video-to-DVD-Video
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