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  1. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Oh brother!

    Maybe you didn't know this, but
    1. The way that most digital, "software" stabilizers work is that they make use of the fact that sensors are often larger area than those pixels read out, so it doesn't "shrink" anything down or interpolate, it just moves the region of interest. This has the effect of keeping the image steady (though it cannot correct for motion blur).
    2. The way most lens-based "optical" stabilizers (like Sony's Steadyshot) work is that the focal point is adjustable or "floats", similar to a perspective correcting lens, and the directions of floating is counter to the movement perceived by the gyro sensors in the cam/lens. The thing is, this usually requires a special lens that supports the tech ($$). And more importantly, it screws up autofocus methods, so the MANUFACTURERS specifically RECOMMEND that the feature be turned OFF when mounting on STABLE rigs (such as a tripod, or steadicam, or GIMBALLED system).
    Depending on its reaction speed, it also may not be able to fully correct for motion blur, when in use.

    Scott
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  2. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Oh brother!

    Maybe you didn't know this, but
    1. The way that most digital, "software" stabilizers work is that they make use of the fact that sensors are often larger area than those pixels read out, so it doesn't "shrink" anything down or interpolate, it just moves the region of interest. This has the effect of keeping the image steady (though it cannot correct for motion blur).
    2. The way most lens-based "optical" stabilizers (like Sony's Steadyshot) work is that the focal point is adjustable or "floats", similar to a perspective correcting lens, and the directions of floating is counter to the movement perceived by the gyro sensors in the cam/lens. The thing is, this usually requires a special lens that supports the tech ($$). And more importantly, it screws up autofocus methods, so the MANUFACTURERS specifically RECOMMEND that the feature be turned OFF when mounting on STABLE rigs (such as a tripod, or steadicam, or GIMBALLED system).
    Depending on its reaction speed, it also may not be able to fully correct for motion blur, when in use.

    Scott
    I had at least 12 camcorders during my life. The internal software stabilizers always made the picture a little darker, the angle of view always shrinked, and the zoom range also shrinked...
    Last edited by Truthler; 2nd Dec 2021 at 11:04.
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