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  1. Member
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    This is video stream from DVD. It's mopic form 1954.

    Code:
    Video
    ID                             : 224 (0xE0)
    Format                         : MPEG Video
    Format version                 : Version 2
    Format profile                 : Main@Main
    Format settings                : CustomMatrix / BVOP
    Format settings, BVOP          : Yes
    Format settings, Matrix        : Custom
    Format settings, GOP           : Variable
    Duration                       : 1 h 38 min
    Bit rate mode                  : Variable
    Bit rate                       : 4 962 kb/s
    Maximum bit rate               : 9 800 kb/s
    Width                          : 720 pixels
    Height                         : 576 pixels
    Display aspect ratio           : 4:3
    Frame rate                     : 25.000 FPS
    Standard                       : Component
    Color space                    : YUV
    Chroma subsampling             : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                      : 8 bits
    Scan type                      : Progressive
    Scan order                     : Top Field First
    Compression mode               : Lossy
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)             : 0.479
    Time code of first frame       : 00:59:59:00
    Time code source               : Group of pictures header
    GOP, Open/Closed               : Open
    GOP, Open/Closed of first fram : Closed
    Stream size                    : 3.41 GiB (80%)
    Color primaries                : BT.601 PAL
    Transfer characteristics       : BT.470 System B/G
    Matrix coefficients            : BT.470 System B/G
    What AVC (will AVC be ok?) parameters do you recommend to not to deteriorate low quality (becaose of age and DVD)? At the moment I tried CRF=16 and I got 4.1mbps output, so this is probably to high.
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  2. AVC is fine. But not all DVDs are created equal. To get best results you will have to do some filtering and that filtering will differ depending on the particular DVD. As a start, many DVDs should be deblocked, deringed, inverse telecined back to the original film frames, and denoised. You need to provide a sample to get more detailed suggestions.
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  3. Originally Posted by JosephTocco View Post

    What AVC (will AVC be ok?) parameters do you recommend to not to deteriorate low quality (becaose of age and DVD)? At the moment I tried CRF=16 and I got 4.1mbps output, so this is probably to high.
    It's already compressed, keep it in original form in .mkv container.
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  4. Member
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    Here is sample:
    Code:
    https://www77.zippyshare.com/v/nD3GQR3h/file.html
    Yeah, putting DVD to MKV is what I always did, but my not very old Samsung pseudosmart tv can't play MPEG...
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  5. Did you try another container? VOB or TS?
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  6. Member
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    Nope. Btw: how to multiplex to VOB (create DVD?) or TS?
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  7. It's more probable that the TV can't play mkv than MPEG2 then (although I don't know).
    For VOB I would simply rip the DVD with DVDDecrypter. Under IFO-mode-options you have to set "split" to no split, so that you'll get one big VOB.
    For TS I would use TSMuxer.
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  8. Member
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    Originally Posted by Quint View Post
    It's more probable that the TV can't play mkv than MPEG2 then (although I don't know).
    So, all Samsungs starts from 2018 support only 264 and 265 (only, really...). They also doesn't support DTS and other HQ formats that we are using in our files (only basic old formats). So I have to make many conversions
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  9. Member
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    Rather than spending time making a square peg fit a round hole, stream the file using a program like Plex or get an Android box for ~$50 that will play almost any video format.
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  10. If you can access your videos via a WiFi network share get the onn Android TV media player from Walmart for US$20:

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/onn-Android-TV-UHD-Streaming-Device/636597403

    It will be the best $20 you ever spent. It will play pretty much everything you're likely to throw at it. It's nearly as good as the Chromecast with Google TV (usually US$50, on sale now for US$40).
    Last edited by jagabo; 26th Nov 2021 at 12:17.
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  11. Originally Posted by JosephTocco View Post
    Originally Posted by Quint View Post
    It's more probable that the TV can't play mkv than MPEG2 then (although I don't know).
    So, all Samsungs starts from 2018 support only 264 and 265 (only, really...). They also doesn't support DTS and other HQ formats that we are using in our files (only basic old formats). So I have to make many conversions
    Seems, I'm getting old.
    Then... Use an old cheap DVD or BluRay player to play the MPEG2-streams from Harddisk. I recommend this because it's the way not to change anything on the source, what is important if you consider telecining, interlacing a.s.o. I always would change sources as less than I could.
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  12. Member
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    Originally Posted by Quint View Post
    Then... Use an old cheap DVD or BluRay player to play the MPEG2-streams from Harddisk. I recommend this because it's the way not to change anything on the source, what is important if you consider telecining, interlacing a.s.o. I always would change sources as less than I could.
    I wouldn't recommend DVD players for this purpose because they have very limited media file playback capabilities if any.

    Blu-ray players often include much better media players than DVD players but it is still necessary to look carefully at the specs printed in the manual to be sure that they can play something more than music and jpeg photos from their USB connection.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
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  13. I have opposite experiences with formats. I use quite old BluRay Players (I had LG, Sony and Samsung) in exact that way since several years, and they play everything (except for 4k and H265, of course). But mediaplayers are of course not the most comfortable, and especially when you live in PAL country you often have to change HDMI settings to avoid jerkyness. Not a "perfect" solution either.
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  14. Member
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    IMO always read the manual.

    I recall that some more expensive players from Sony and Panasonic that I looked at in 2012 played very little in the way of media files. However, according to its manual, the relatively inexpensive LG Blu-ray player that I bought in 2012 might play MKV files, MPG files, and TS files with MPEG-2 video and DTS but I am not certain of it because too many container file types and codecs are listed together. Some of the possible audio and video combinations would be very odd for some of the listed container files. (It is disconnected and waiting to be recycled because it doesn't recognize Blu-ray discs anymore.)

    My new Sony UHD Blu-ray player plays MPG files and TS files with MPEG-2 video and DTS but not MKV files with MPEG-2 video.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 27th Nov 2021 at 18:30.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
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