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  1. What is the best device that can be used to scan 8mm film
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  2. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by s-mp View Post
    What is the best device that can be used to scan 8mm film
    The best method is wetgate, after pre-cleaning, which removes all debris. That's what (truly) pro scan services use. The scans are archival.

    Or did you mean one of the lower quality drygate DIY/home methods?
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  3. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    Originally Posted by s-mp View Post
    What is the best device that can be used to scan 8mm film
    The best method is wetgate, after pre-cleaning, which removes all debris. That's what (truly) pro scan services use. The scans are archival.

    Or did you mean one of the lower quality drygate DIY/home methods?
    well anything that outperforms quality of old vhs telecine would be welcome
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  4. Those seem like overkill for scanning home films. Maybe I should have mentioned what I was trying to scan...
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  5. Last edited by OldMan64; 20th Sep 2021 at 07:34.
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  6. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Here is the only thread I know that discusses the Reflecta


    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/366069-The-Reflecta-Super8-film-scanner-to-avi-conversion-thread


    Several scanners available at Amazon. Here are the UK results


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=super+8+scanner&page=2&qid=1632141080&ref=sr_pg_1


    I recall one thread about one scanner where the user was having issues with it. Methinks he was attempting to use the larger 400 or even 600 ft reels whereas these are geared to 50 or 200 ft reels.


    I have only done Super 8 using a mirror-box. The results were satisfactory for me. Actually gave the unit away a few months ago to a fellow member here.
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  7. Thank you all.
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  8. Originally Posted by s-mp View Post
    Those seem like overkill for scanning home films. Maybe I should have mentioned what I was trying to scan...
    I wasn't really serious. I have just come to hate it when someone asks "What's the best..." without any qualifications. The biggest of which is "that doesn't cost more than..."
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  9. I think the question you need to ask yourself is

    How many feet of cine film do you need to have scanned?

    Sound or Silent?

    Then go to google and find the film scan houses in your country that can scan it for you.

    Look at different prices for different qualities of scan from different film houses.

    A pen and paper, jot down costs for different types of scan.

    Get at least four different prices for a basic 2K scan no frills, no fuss, on a usb stick.

    Tot up the cost, including media and p+p etc.

    You will need an idea of how many feet of film you have to get a price.

    The 'almost' cheapest option for home scanning is the Wolverine.

    There are two versions

    The basic and the pro.

    basic is around 300 and only does up to 200ft reels, the Pro around 400 and takes 400ft reels.

    The basic will disappoint. I know, trust me.

    Then compare prices between what it would cost for a house to do it, or you spend hours scanning yourself and the associated post work required to make things right after a Wolverine home scan, for around 400, plus time editing on your computer.

    The Pro Wolverine does do a half decent job, and if you have thousands of feet, then that is your best option.

    It takes a Wolverine around 30 minutes to scan 50ft to a memory card.

    The Wolverine Pro comes out at around 20fps which is not ideal, the basic at 30fps which is outrageous.

    If you only have 200ft of Aunty Betty on a golf buggy in Florida, send it to a film house and be done with it.

    The cheapest home scan option, borrow a known working projector, point it and a camera with adjustable frame rate, at a wall, and do a cheap as shite point and shoot and then decide what needs scanning by a house and what can be forgotten.

    Cine films from back in the day can often contain hours of endless scenery and very little else.

    A family sent me 72 fifty foot reels, 10 of those were birds nests!

    If you can't get hold of a projector, buy a cine viewer on ebay and some splicing kit, go thro the reels and splice out the best bits of Aunt Betty and her golf buggy for a film house to scan.

    Bear in mind if you have super 8 or standard 8 you need the right equipment to play it back on to view it before splicing.

    You might find that viewing the cine will allow you to edit out the 'best bits' of long gone family or friends, dump the scenery shots, and just have the best bits scanned by a film house.

    If you do have sound film then a film house is your best option if you don't have a sound projector.

    A wolverine won't do sound, so you will need to record the sound from a stable working projector to laptop, and sync it up in post, which will be a nightmare if your skills are lacking in the edit department.

    If you do go 'film house' don't get the footage on dvd or blu ray, get it as .mp4 or .mov on a USB device.

    You can always burn dvd or blu ray from the USB files later, to give to family.
    Last edited by super8rescue; 22nd Sep 2021 at 03:52.
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  10. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    Originally Posted by s-mp View Post
    What is the best device that can be used to scan 8mm film
    The best method is wetgate, after pre-cleaning, which removes all debris. That's what (truly) pro scan services use. The scans are archival.

    Or did you mean one of the lower quality drygate DIY/home methods?
    Doesn't wet gate lower the sharpness very slightly? Because you are adding an other layer ontop the emulsion, albeit with the same refractive index of the base.
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