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  1. Member
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    Aug 2021
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    All,

    As this is my first post I apologize if I have mislabeled or anything like that, mods please provide feedback or directions if I should move this post elsewhere.

    Recently I purchased a very old VHS player, I am assuming from my research 1979-80 as that is the copyright date on all the manuals. It is a top loading Magnavox and despite days of deep-diving on the internet I truly cannot find any other mention or example of it anywhere. What's amazing from this find, I spent 20 bucks on it, listing was honest that it would power on but not work, it arrived to my home complete in the original box from 1979-80 with all the original paperwork, tethered "remote control" all cables, VHS order forms etc etc. As you can see from the photos below it is in great condition and I got to work trying to figure out why it wouldn't power on.

    Going through a typical checklist I learned the power light wouldn't come on but the clock would and all moving parts were sticky. I cleaned and oiled the moving parts for the tape (No I did not touch the head) using an approved oil for electronics. Checked belts everything was moving and good, found that the VHS sensing bulb was blown out. Got a similar bulb and replaced and wow were are in business. FF, RW, all major functions now work again, power light comes on, tape feeds and all moving parts for the head and tape functions work great....except I do not get any video or audio output to my television...

    Process of elimination I tried all forms of video out to the same result (it has UHF, coax, and composite out). I know the TV is receiving some sort of signal because it will have the static snow storm when the tape is not being played, the moment I hit play the tape queues up and my TV goes black and silent. Furthermore, I plugged in my SNES into the Video In composition (for home cameras) and plugged the VHS player composite out to my television, when I select Input - Camera my SNES plays on the TV fromt he VHS, no sound but I am at least getting video. While the SNES is on and playing video, I can press play on the VHS tape, action works great and the TV goes black and silent again.

    I know due to the fact the VHS will override my SNES and the snowstorm that a signal is being produced and overriding whatever else seems to be playing at the time, I just cannot figure out why I am not getting any audio or video...

    I have also tried multiple VHS tapes all to the same result. I have also explored the electronics and cannot find any blown caps or signs of extreme heat damage...I am at a loss here and any advice would be so appreciated. I can also provide a video of what I am seeing if that helps.

    Thank you !
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  2. Not to be rude but, $20 and hours of work wasted. There are very few people here who can help you, I would reach out to Lord Smurf.
    It's not important the problem be solved, only that the blame for the mistake is assigned correctly
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by sum_guy View Post
    Not to be rude but, $20 and hours of work wasted. There are very few people here who can help you, I would reach out to Lord Smurf.
    Only somewhat rude ! LOLOL

    I enjoy restoring old electronics, trust me my wife hates it as I have a garage full of this crap. I turn over old AM tube radios quickly for profit. TVs are a major pain, figured I would give a cool VCR a go, especially for only 20 bucks.

    Anyways thank you for pointing out Lord Smurf, will send them a DM.
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  4. Member hiptune's Avatar
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    There are better performing VCRs with better picture and Hi-Fi sound (blows this deck's mono sound out of the water) for $45 + shipping.

    Not to be rude, but it's a boat anchor.
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  5. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    I second that, You spend hours or even days of work for nothing as they don't have any value in the collectible market, let alone finding parts for them. The machines that sell pretty well are the JVC and Panasonic S-VHS with TBC, Sony SuperBeta (models with S-Video) and ED Beta's namely EDV-7500, EDV-9500 (7300, 9300 Canadian models). Those are worth fixing, you can turn $250 into $1200.

    If you must contact someone for help try 12voltvids or video99.co.uk youtube members, Those are qualified repair professionals that did it for a living, Though I doubt remote help would work in these situations, they need to have the deck on the bench to find out what's wrong with it.
    Last edited by dellsam34; 5th Sep 2021 at 12:14.
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  6. Might be stating the obvious here but I'm sure there are capacitors (usually just electrolytics) in there that need replacing after 40 years, whether they look it or not. The quickest way to identify bad caps is with an ESR meter (MESR-100 V2 is good I hear) because you can test them in-circuit i.e. without removing them.

    I know ESR meters aren't 100% at identifying bad caps though, and doing it in-circuit is less reliable. But you could skip buying the meter and just replace all the electrolytics. Whether that will fix the unit I'm not sure. There's a Youtuber named 12voltvids who really knows VCR repair so looking at his channel might help.
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  7. Member Skiller's Avatar
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    If it doesn't have a number of capacitors in the hundreds, like some Panasonics, and if you really are into saving this VCR, it is certainly worth a try.
    In all other cases consider yourself the owner of a bulky, fancy looking clock.
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