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  1. God's Child
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    I have a 2012 Mac mini that is slow is slow can be and the system kind of seems to be falling apart. I asked on this forum about selling it a long time ago, and most people recommended I do that. My mom, long story short, can get me a discount through her job on a new computer. Iím thinking laptops because they are cheaper than the fancy desktops, right? I donít think they last as long (correct me if Iím wrong), but as long as itís not too big a difference in longevity. I donít know about all of the fancy stuff when it comes to computers, like upgrading this and that. I simply want a machine that runs fast and performs fairly basic stuff. I donít do stuff like video editing or other big projects, typically, so I donít need some super beast of a computer. Not sure if I really have much of a clear price range (plus again, I should be able to get a discount), but I of course donít want to be paying thousands of dollars or anything (money is tight!). But I could really use a new Mac. Any recommended models I could ask my mom to look for?
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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    start by looking here - https://www.apple.com/mac/
    MacBook Air start at $899
    Last edited by october262; 16th Aug 2021 at 03:26.
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  3. God's Child
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    I just spoke with a Mac sales representative, and based on my desire to use video editing and programs like Photoshop for personal use, she recommended the MacBook Pro. One thing I noticed though was that I have more than one option for the processor. Thereís the Apple M1 chip, but I can also get it with an Intel Core i5 or i7 processor. Not knowing the difference, I asked about it, and she said that the M1 is geared only toward newer programs. Researching it online, it looks like thereís something called ďRosettaď that will allow me to run older applications, but for what Iím seeing it sounds like the performance isnít as strong when using Rosetta. Iím currently using Photoshop Elements 13 Editor. I would understand if I had to get a newer version, but do you know if any version will run straight off the M1 chip? I think the only other real programs of consequence that would not be built into the computer at this point would be some kind a virtual machine through which I can run Mac OS 9 for old timeís sake. Based on all of this, can anyone recommend me as to which processor I should go with? Thanks.
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  4. Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    I just spoke with a Mac sales representative, and based on my desire to use video editing and programs like Photoshop for personal use, she recommended the MacBook Pro. One thing I noticed though was that I have more than one option for the processor. Thereís the Apple M1 chip, but I can also get it with an Intel Core i5 or i7 processor. Not knowing the difference, I asked about it, and she said that the M1 is geared only toward newer programs. Researching it online, it looks like thereís something called ďRosettaď that will allow me to run older applications, but for what Iím seeing it sounds like the performance isnít as strong when using Rosetta. Iím currently using Photoshop Elements 13 Editor. I would understand if I had to get a newer version, but do you know if any version will run straight off the M1 chip? I think the only other real programs of consequence that would not be built into the computer at this point would be some kind a virtual machine through which I can run Mac OS 9 for old timeís sake. Based on all of this, can anyone recommend me as to which processor I should go with? Thanks.
    intel is older and more compatible, m1 is new af and incompatible with lots of older software
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  5. God's Child
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    Originally Posted by s-mp View Post
    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    I just spoke with a Mac sales representative, and based on my desire to use video editing and programs like Photoshop for personal use, she recommended the MacBook Pro. One thing I noticed though was that I have more than one option for the processor. Thereís the Apple M1 chip, but I can also get it with an Intel Core i5 or i7 processor. Not knowing the difference, I asked about it, and she said that the M1 is geared only toward newer programs. Researching it online, it looks like thereís something called ďRosettaď that will allow me to run older applications, but for what Iím seeing it sounds like the performance isnít as strong when using Rosetta. Iím currently using Photoshop Elements 13 Editor. I would understand if I had to get a newer version, but do you know if any version will run straight off the M1 chip? I think the only other real programs of consequence that would not be built into the computer at this point would be some kind a virtual machine through which I can run Mac OS 9 for old timeís sake. Based on all of this, can anyone recommend me as to which processor I should go with? Thanks.
    intel is older and more compatible, m1 is new af and incompatible with lots of older software
    Is there any benefit to the M1, then?

    Which would you recommend? i7? i5?
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Speed! Big difference in speed from what I've seen.

    Intel Macs are landlocked to this last OS (Big Sur), so if you get one you will not be able to ever further upgrade.


    M1s are the 1st gen, and M2s are about to come out, so check which chip platform is under the hood. M2 is certain to be both faster/more powerful AND more stable.


    Scott
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  7. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    The M1 was all overpriced, and the "sales" were ridiculous (mere ~$25 off).
    Wait for the M2 to be reviewed.
    If you're impatient, get the M1, but be prepared to kick yourself for not waiting for the M2.
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  8. God's Child
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Speed! Big difference in speed from what I've seen.

    Intel Macs are landlocked to this last OS (Big Sur), so if you get one you will not be able to ever further upgrade.


    M1s are the 1st gen, and M2s are about to come out, so check which chip platform is under the hood. M2 is certain to be both faster/more powerful AND more stable.


    Scott
    So the Apple M chips are very efficient, but they donít let me run older software? Is there a way I can get efficiency and still run older software?
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    No.

    Apple ONCE AGAIN changed their entire chip platform and set off another round of forced obsolescence. So you can go old, and all that entails, or new, and all that entails.

    I agree with LS. If you can wait M2 will likely be worth it. Note there should be no program difference between M1, M2, a future M3, etc.


    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 19th Aug 2021 at 21:45.
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  10. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    If you wait for the M2, and to be reviewed, one of two things will happen:
    - M2 will be shown as far superior, worth the wait.
    - M2 will be "as good as" M1, but then the M1 will also have a price cut.

    Win-win.

    I want a new Mac, I'm still using a Mini from 2010, and it's showing it's age now, but I'm taking a wait-and-see approach. I know Apple commands a premium, but value for a Mini still has to be there. The M1 isn't overly impressive for the price vs. the older Intel Minis. The Prime Day "deal" wasn't a deal at all.

    But patience is required.

    The M1 has Rosetta 2, so lots of old software will still run, to varying degrees. In fact, I've read where software that quick working in more recent macOS now run again (unconfirmed, not sure where I read that anymore, but interesting). 64-bit software only, no more 32-bit.
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  11. God's Child
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    Thanks for the advice, everyone. Now Iím stuck on something additional: specs. Didnít consider that at first. For what I want to do, is the 256GB SSD storage enough, or do I need the 512GB? Is 8GB memory enough or do I need 16? Appleís website mentions such differences and Iím not sure whatís needed for me.
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    Thanks for the advice, everyone. Now Iím stuck on something additional: specs. Didnít consider that at first. For what I want to do, is the 256GB SSD storage enough, or do I need the 512GB? Is 8GB memory enough or do I need 16? Appleís website mentions such differences and Iím not sure whatís needed for me.
    list ALL the stuff you are wanting to do on your new mac.
    if you read the fine print at the bottom of the page, all tests were using 2TB SSD & 16GB RAM
    Last edited by october262; 21st Aug 2021 at 19:32.
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  13. God's Child
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    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    Thanks for the advice, everyone. Now Iím stuck on something additional: specs. Didnít consider that at first. For what I want to do, is the 256GB SSD storage enough, or do I need the 512GB? Is 8GB memory enough or do I need 16? Appleís website mentions such differences and Iím not sure whatís needed for me.
    list ALL the stuff you are wanting to do on your new mac.
    if you read the fine print at the bottom of the page, all tests were using 2TB SSD & 16GB RAM
    I want to do the more basic stuff like surfing the web and all. I have also enjoyed using iPhoto to keep a whole lot of pictures and do slideshows and stuff. I want to be able to watch stuff on my computer, including online streaming. I want to use Photoshop for photo editing. I would like to do some video editing. I might play an online game. Manage iTunes. Canít really think of anything else at the moment. And I want to be able to run at least a couple apps at once.
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  14. Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    I want to do the more basic stuff like surfing the web and all. I have also enjoyed using iPhoto to keep a whole lot of pictures and do slideshows and stuff. I want to be able to watch stuff on my computer, including online streaming. I want to use Photoshop for photo editing. I would like to do some video editing. I might play an online game. Manage iTunes. Canít really think of anything else at the moment. And I want to be able to run at least a couple apps at once.
    All of this is really really basic stuff that any Mac can do. In normal times, I'd say you're over-thinking this purchase: just get the best-spec MacBook Pro your Mom can snag in your budget range.

    Unfortunately these are not normal times: Apple is smack in the middle of its most user-hostile total reinvention of MacOS since Lion debuted. So replacement buyers are caught between a rock and a hard place: buy an Intel-chip Mac that is compatible with everything they now have (but risk being rapidly left behind for software updates and web compatibility), or buy a new M-chip Mac that will be compatible with Apple's future direction (but might prove super problematic with some of your current favorite software unless you buy all-new M versions).

    Those of us who are quite happy with how older Macs run our legacy software might lean toward an Intel replacement. Heck, LS and I and others who still use Mac Mini models even older than yours have no speed issues with correctly-configured OS and apps. The problem is often not so much the hardware being slow but Apple's infuriating tendency to brick things with OS updates, not to mention their "closed-loop" web compatibility antics that render older Macs/OS iterations much slower or less web compatible than they innately could be (if Apple didn't deliberately prevent the normal browser updates that are routine on other platforms). If you only use a a Mac for certain specialty apps that don't need to be updated, and you don't need them as primary web portals, old models can go on almost indefinitely.

    YOU are not that type of "geek" user: you're more of an everyday consumer who mostly wants to do web-centric stuff and maybe occasionally some photo editing (you mention video in passing but haven't said anything specific). Everyday consumers focused on web stuff have no choice in the matter: buy a new Mac that employs Apples latest chip platform, or you'll have web woes eventually. Apple has staked its Mac OS future on "M" and will completely abandon its Intel platform faster than you'd ever imagine, so as a general-purpose user you're forced to play along whether you like it or not (the OS dictates your web access options). So my advice mirrors others above: stall as long as possible, even if it means you lose out on your Mom's discount privilege. Make do with your old Mini until the M2 models become widely available: most of the early M hardware and OS bugs will have been ironed out and more apps will have been updated properly.

    Consider carefully how you prefer to use a computer: the MacBooks are great if you really do need/use the portability, if not the Mini makes for a better desktop experience with a larger screen and (usually) more/easier HDD options. Also new-model MacBooks tend to be plagued with more factory issues than new-model Minis or iMacs. If limited to SSD, 256 is OK if you won't be doing extensive video work, otherwise look for a larger drive. RAM memory can be tricky with some Apple models: 8 might be OK to start but make sure it can be easily expanded later with an extra memory card. If the 8 model only has hard wired memory with no expansion slot you should probably go with the 16 option right from the start to avoid future upgrade trouble.
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  15. God's Child
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    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    I want to do the more basic stuff like surfing the web and all. I have also enjoyed using iPhoto to keep a whole lot of pictures and do slideshows and stuff. I want to be able to watch stuff on my computer, including online streaming. I want to use Photoshop for photo editing. I would like to do some video editing. I might play an online game. Manage iTunes. Canít really think of anything else at the moment. And I want to be able to run at least a couple apps at once.
    All of this is really really basic stuff that any Mac can do. In normal times, I'd say you're over-thinking this purchase: just get the best-spec MacBook Pro your Mom can snag in your budget range.

    Unfortunately these are not normal times: Apple is smack in the middle of its most user-hostile total reinvention of MacOS since Lion debuted. So replacement buyers are caught between a rock and a hard place: buy an Intel-chip Mac that is compatible with everything they now have (but risk being rapidly left behind for software updates and web compatibility), or buy a new M-chip Mac that will be compatible with Apple's future direction (but might prove super problematic with some of your current favorite software unless you buy all-new M versions).

    Those of us who are quite happy with how older Macs run our legacy software might lean toward an Intel replacement. Heck, LS and I and others who still use Mac Mini models even older than yours have no speed issues with correctly-configured OS and apps. The problem is often not so much the hardware being slow but Apple's infuriating tendency to brick things with OS updates, not to mention their "closed-loop" web compatibility antics that render older Macs/OS iterations much slower or less web compatible than they innately could be (if Apple didn't deliberately prevent the normal browser updates that are routine on other platforms). If you only use a a Mac for certain specialty apps that don't need to be updated, and you don't need them as primary web portals, old models can go on almost indefinitely.

    YOU are not that type of "geek" user: you're more of an everyday consumer who mostly wants to do web-centric stuff and maybe occasionally some photo editing (you mention video in passing but haven't said anything specific). Everyday consumers focused on web stuff have no choice in the matter: buy a new Mac that employs Apples latest chip platform, or you'll have web woes eventually. Apple has staked its Mac OS future on "M" and will completely abandon its Intel platform faster than you'd ever imagine, so as a general-purpose user you're forced to play along whether you like it or not (the OS dictates your web access options). So my advice mirrors others above: stall as long as possible, even if it means you lose out on your Mom's discount privilege. Make do with your old Mini until the M2 models become widely available: most of the early M hardware and OS bugs will have been ironed out and more apps will have been updated properly.

    Consider carefully how you prefer to use a computer: the MacBooks are great if you really do need/use the portability, if not the Mini makes for a better desktop experience with a larger screen and (usually) more/easier HDD options. Also new-model MacBooks tend to be plagued with more factory issues than new-model Minis or iMacs. If limited to SSD, 256 is OK if you won't be doing extensive video work, otherwise look for a larger drive. RAM memory can be tricky with some Apple models: 8 might be OK to start but make sure it can be easily expanded later with an extra memory card. If the 8 model only has hard wired memory with no expansion slot you should probably go with the 16 option right from the start to avoid future upgrade trouble.
    In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail.

    I donít have a lot of money. Even if the M2 is better than the M1, is it really such a big deal that I need to wait? Even if the M2 is way better, want the M1 do what I need right now? Plus if I was going to wait to get a computer when the M2 comes out, wouldnít I have to pay more to get it with that chip? Iím just worried about the extra money this could all run into.

    Well Iím not sure what you have been doing with your older computers, because Iíve done everything I can think of with my Mac mini, and have asked for help on this forum before, and the thing runs worse than ever. Takes a while just for it to start up, then takes even longer for me to actually start being able to use it without the perpetual rainbow wheel.

    If I get the laptop, couldnít I just hook it up to my TV when Iím in my room and use the TV as a monitor there, and then use the built-in screen when Iím elsewhere? Will there really be a difference to the point where I would need to consider a desktop computer to use a larger monitor and everything?

    Not really sure what do you mean about a Mac mini being better for HDD, because I donít know about the difference between SSD and HDD and which I would need.

    I have no idea how easy it would be to upgrade memory on a MacBook Pro. I didnít even know that there was a possibility of using a chip. All I know is it sounds like the MacBook doesnít have many ports at all, and I would need to use a special cable to allow me to connect everything else to it, like my external hard drive, etc.
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  16. Member
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    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    I want to do the more basic stuff like surfing the web and all. I have also enjoyed using iPhoto to keep a whole lot of pictures and do slideshows and stuff. I want to be able to watch stuff on my computer, including online streaming. I want to use Photoshop for photo editing. I would like to do some video editing. I might play an online game. Manage iTunes. Canít really think of anything else at the moment. And I want to be able to run at least a couple apps at once.
    All of this is really really basic stuff that any Mac can do. In normal times, I'd say you're over-thinking this purchase: just get the best-spec MacBook Pro your Mom can snag in your budget range.

    Unfortunately these are not normal times: Apple is smack in the middle of its most user-hostile total reinvention of MacOS since Lion debuted. So replacement buyers are caught between a rock and a hard place: buy an Intel-chip Mac that is compatible with everything they now have (but risk being rapidly left behind for software updates and web compatibility), or buy a new M-chip Mac that will be compatible with Apple's future direction (but might prove super problematic with some of your current favorite software unless you buy all-new M versions).

    Those of us who are quite happy with how older Macs run our legacy software might lean toward an Intel replacement. Heck, LS and I and others who still use Mac Mini models even older than yours have no speed issues with correctly-configured OS and apps. The problem is often not so much the hardware being slow but Apple's infuriating tendency to brick things with OS updates, not to mention their "closed-loop" web compatibility antics that render older Macs/OS iterations much slower or less web compatible than they innately could be (if Apple didn't deliberately prevent the normal browser updates that are routine on other platforms). If you only use a a Mac for certain specialty apps that don't need to be updated, and you don't need them as primary web portals, old models can go on almost indefinitely.

    YOU are not that type of "geek" user: you're more of an everyday consumer who mostly wants to do web-centric stuff and maybe occasionally some photo editing (you mention video in passing but haven't said anything specific). Everyday consumers focused on web stuff have no choice in the matter: buy a new Mac that employs Apples latest chip platform, or you'll have web woes eventually. Apple has staked its Mac OS future on "M" and will completely abandon its Intel platform faster than you'd ever imagine, so as a general-purpose user you're forced to play along whether you like it or not (the OS dictates your web access options). So my advice mirrors others above: stall as long as possible, even if it means you lose out on your Mom's discount privilege. Make do with your old Mini until the M2 models become widely available: most of the early M hardware and OS bugs will have been ironed out and more apps will have been updated properly.

    Consider carefully how you prefer to use a computer: the MacBooks are great if you really do need/use the portability, if not the Mini makes for a better desktop experience with a larger screen and (usually) more/easier HDD options. Also new-model MacBooks tend to be plagued with more factory issues than new-model Minis or iMacs. If limited to SSD, 256 is OK if you won't be doing extensive video work, otherwise look for a larger drive. RAM memory can be tricky with some Apple models: 8 might be OK to start but make sure it can be easily expanded later with an extra memory card. If the 8 model only has hard wired memory with no expansion slot you should probably go with the 16 option right from the start to avoid future upgrade trouble.
    In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail.

    I donít have a lot of money. Even if the M2 is better than the M1, is it really such a big deal that I need to wait? Even if the M2 is way better, want the M1 do what I need right now? Plus if I was going to wait to get a computer when the M2 comes out, wouldnít I have to pay more to get it with that chip? Iím just worried about the extra money this could all run into.

    Well Iím not sure what you have been doing with your older computers, because Iíve done everything I can think of with my Mac mini, and have asked for help on this forum before, and the thing runs worse than ever. Takes a while just for it to start up, then takes even longer for me to actually start being able to use it without the perpetual rainbow wheel.

    If I get the laptop, couldnít I just hook it up to my TV when Iím in my room and use the TV as a monitor there, and then use the built-in screen when Iím elsewhere? Will there really be a difference to the point where I would need to consider a desktop computer to use a larger monitor and everything?

    Not really sure what do you mean about a Mac mini being better for HDD, because I donít know about the difference between SSD and HDD and which I would need.

    I have no idea how easy it would be to upgrade memory on a MacBook Pro. I didnít even know that there was a possibility of using a chip. All I know is it sounds like the MacBook doesnít have many ports at all, and I would need to use a special cable to allow me to connect everything else to it, like my external hard drive, etc.
    there's plenty of tutorials on youtube that show how to upgrade memory on a macbook pro - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCV4ijq9VHQ

    and for the difference between SSD & HDD, SSDs boot faster than HDDs - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j84eEjP-RL4
    Last edited by october262; 22nd Aug 2021 at 22:58.
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  17. In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail..
    Try using LosslessCut now on your Mac mini to cut out parts and clips of the video and remix them together.

    Streaming and downloading scenes try distillvideo dot com or mp3conv dot cc
    Or a GUI to youtube-dl
    Also i would keep your Mac mini and just run Linux Mint 20.2 cinnamon on it and you can find most video editing and some basic image editors all for free and open source to do what ya need. It's an adjustment but if Catalina feels slow to you it might be the time to make the move.
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  18. God's Child
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    Originally Posted by mrbass View Post

    In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail..
    Try using LosslessCut now on your Mac mini to cut out parts and clips of the video and remix them together.

    Streaming and downloading scenes try distillvideo dot com or mp3conv dot cc
    Or a GUI to youtube-dl
    Also i would keep your Mac mini and just run Linux Mint 20.2 cinnamon on it and you can find most video editing and some basic image editors all for free and open source to do what ya need. It's an adjustment but if Catalina feels slow to you it might be the time to make the move.
    I canít keep the Mac mini I have. Itís too slow to do anything now. Anyway do you think 8 GB of memory would be enough to do this kind of video stuff?
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  19. Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail.
    DVD work is more cumbersome on most newer computers because they have stopped including a built-in DVD drive. You will most likely need to budget for an optional external USB disc drive at some point when you are ready to do that project. Also note newer MacBooks make further headaches by not having normal USB ports: some models only have the latest small USB-C ports (as used on phones). Adapetrs are available, but its annoying and another piece to keep track of. The new M platform may not have DVD creation software available yet, and might not ever since Apple has lost all interest in supporting any video apps aside from their own Final Cut system. If the M Rosetta feature is compatible with older DVD authoring tools, perhaps that would work for you.

    I donít have a lot of money. Even if the M2 is better than the M1, is it really such a big deal that I need to wait? Even if the M2 is way better, want the M1 do what I need right now? Plus if I was going to wait to get a computer when the M2 comes out, wouldnít I have to pay more to get it with that chip? Iím just worried about the extra money this could all run into.
    It takes some months to work the bugs out after a major shift like Intel to M, the first buyers are 'guinea pigs". Apple typically starts selling a less-buggy revision six months later. As LS and others have told you, that is usually the best time to buy: for the same money you can get a more refined reliable M2 model, or pick up an earlier M1 model at a further discounted price. Having been a Mac user for over 30 years, I personally would never buy any first-generation new Mac model after a major change like the current M lineup: I always wait for the second revisions or later. But as you seem determined to replace your old Mini ASAP, and have a discount thru your mothers job, it may be a good bet for you.

    Well Iím not sure what you have been doing with your older computers, because Iíve done everything I can think of with my Mac mini, and have asked for help on this forum before, and the thing runs worse than ever. Takes a while just for it to start up, then takes even longer for me to actually start being able to use it without the perpetual rainbow wheel.
    Old Macs can run very very fast with the proper OS, apps and hardware but only for specific specialty purposes. To use the web quickly and reliably requires a reasonably current Mac model and OS version: for everyday common use it is easier and better to just buy a complete newer Mac model than upgrade an old one.

    If I get the laptop, couldnít I just hook it up to my TV when Iím in my room and use the TV as a monitor there, and then use the built-in screen when Iím elsewhere? Will there really be a difference to the point where I would need to consider a desktop computer to use a larger monitor and everything?
    It wasn't clear that you had your Mini hooked up to a regular TV, I assumed you were using a standard separate computer monitor screen and keyboard on a dedicated desk or table. If you prefer a more casual portable configuration, yes you should be able to connect a new MacBook to your TV. However the special USB-C>HDMI adapter cable could be more expensive than you expect: the Apple MultiAV version is $69 but does also include a standard size USB port next to the HDMI (plus a charging port for an iPhone/iPad). Off-brand adapters are much cheaper but sometimes flaky. All adapters are clumsy and can easily pull out of a laptop unexpectedly. The Mac Mini includes a standard HDMI port and two normal USB ports, no extra cost, no adapters needed.

    Not really sure what do you mean about a Mac mini being better for HDD, because I donít know about the difference between SSD and HDD and which I would need.
    Forget what I said about the Mini having an advantage here: I was thinking of the older Mini models, which could be more easily upgraded to larger storage than the MacBooks. The M platform (at present) is not user upgradable at all: both memory and SSD storage drive are hard wired to the M processor. So whatever spec you buy, you are stuck with forever. From what I'm hearing, the models with 16 GB memory and 512GB SSD are a better buy than the 8/256 models (if you can afford them).

    I have no idea how easy it would be to upgrade memory on a MacBook Pro. I didnít even know that there was a possibility of using a chip. All I know is it sounds like the MacBook doesnít have many ports at all, and I would need to use a special cable to allow me to connect everything else to it, like my external hard drive, etc.
    As above, I mis-spoke. All the M models, whether Mini, iMac or MacBook, are completely sealed with no upgrades possible. What you buy now is what you get permanently. And yes, the Mac laptops are a great big pain if you have any intention of connecting external monitors or flash memory sticks or dvd drives: everything requires a clunky adapter.

    While the portability of the MacBooks is appealing, they are a poor bargain vs the Mini unless you will almost exclusively use the laptop in portable situations. If you mostly use the computer at home, the Mini is much simpler to handle because it has normal HDMI and USB ports already built in. The new M1 Mini 8/256 version is half the price of the MacBook Pro M, if you can afford approx $1000 the Mini M 16/512 version would be the best long-term investment. The cheapest MacBook Air M model is still 50% more expensive than the Mini M. If money is very tight, and you don't have a pressing need for a laptop you can carry outside the home, nothing beats the Mini M for price/performance (as little as $649, or even less with your Mom's discount).

    Rumors are running rampant the 2nd-generation "M2" Mini due at the end of the year will be a higher-end model with a new chassis, and the current M1 Mini will remain the budget alternative. So if you're leaning toward the Mini choice, I guess there's no advantage to waiting for the new models. The laptops are a different story: I'd wait for the M2 unless your Mom's discount on the M1 MacBooks is really good.
    Last edited by orsetto; 23rd Aug 2021 at 23:38.
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  20. Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    Originally Posted by mrbass View Post

    In the immediate, all I can really think of to say as far as what I plan to do with video editing is do a personal edit of some movies, which means taking certain things out. I did just think of one other thing: The Japanese version of Pokemon is not available in America, and it actually isnít even on DVD or higher in Japan for the older episodes. I was actually thinking of looking into how I might be able to use a VPN to stream the episodes and then somehow rip the episodes to my computer so I could put them on DVDs. Not sure what that will entail..
    Try using LosslessCut now on your Mac mini to cut out parts and clips of the video and remix them together.

    Streaming and downloading scenes try distillvideo dot com or mp3conv dot cc
    Or a GUI to youtube-dl
    Also i would keep your Mac mini and just run Linux Mint 20.2 cinnamon on it and you can find most video editing and some basic image editors all for free and open source to do what ya need. It's an adjustment but if Catalina feels slow to you it might be the time to make the move.
    I canít keep the Mac mini I have. Itís too slow to do anything now. Anyway do you think 8 GB of memory would be enough to do this kind of video stuff?
    yes I use a mac mini 2012 with 4GB and I got rid of Catalina. It's working out so well. Under Catalina I was booting off an external 1TB SSD ...100GB for Mac and 900GB for an encrypted partition with veracrypt. Audacity I had to change the scratch directory to the HDD though for space reasons. Now run Linux Mint off the 1TB HDD and works great. I do have to turn off komga (free java pdf comic server) cuz that uses like 2.4GB of memory so run that on another laptop. It can't do Davinci Resolve nor FinalCut. But it can do LosslessCut and VideoMass and Shotcut even for video editing. Do many ffmpeg command line video and audio editing too. It has 4 cores and makes audiobooks superfast with m4b-tool. I've revived many older laptops with 4GB or 8GB memory and threw on Linux Mint and they're good to go. Use them as emby and komga servers. Unless you're gaming or something keep that mac mini 2012.
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  21. God's Child
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    Iím not sure how many more times I need to say this, but to keep my Mac mini 2012 would be to keep a boat anchor. Unless thereís some miracle way to rework it to actually run fast, which I canít conceive of (considering the condition itís in, and that I feel like Iíve tried everything I know of), I need to upgrade.

    The portability of a MacBook is certainly appealing, but so is the price of a new Mini. What really puts me off to getting a Mini is that the one I have didnít run well off of the newer operating systems even in the earlier days that I had it. Unless Apple has done a tremendous rework on that kind of computer, Iím reluctant to ever buy another Mini. I donít want to ever end up in this kind of situation again.

    @mrbass, what is Catalina and why canít you use FinalCut?

    Iím just wondering if I will need 16GB memory in the long run if Iím not only planning to be doing some video work, but also attempting to get video off of streaming while using a VPN. Then again, I have no prior experience, so I donít know how much memory thatíll actually use.
    "They will walk after the LORD, He will roar like a lion; indeed He will roar and His sons will come trembling from the west." - Hosea 11:10
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  22. Originally Posted by Jeikobu View Post
    Iím not sure how many more times I need to say this, but to keep my Mac mini 2012 would be to keep a boat anchor. Unless thereís some miracle way to rework it to actually run fast, which I canít conceive of (considering the condition itís in, and that I feel like Iíve tried everything I know of), I need to upgrade.
    We're starting to talk in circles.

    You need to understand, you came to a fairly geeky forum where people tend to give detailed technical replies and discuss every possible option, because these threads are read and used by many other people with similar questions. Clearly, it seems you simply wanted a forum to agree that your old mac mini was a stinking pile of garbage (and enthusiastically cheer-lead you to blindly jump on the newest, cheapest Mac you could buy while your mother still had her discount active). You seem upset that no one has given you exactly the reply you wanted, so I'll do it now: yes, if your decade-old Mac is running as slow as dog poop down the side of an igloo, of course you need a new one. BUT:

    The "new Mac" dilemma we've been trying to warn you of is that Apple has a ghastly track record of stink bombs whenever they make a huge change like switching from Intel to M platform: the first wave of the new-platform Macs is always riddled with bugs. Some users get lucky and have no issues, others want to tear their short hairs out in frustration. Since you've suffered with a problem Mac for awhile now, we just want you to be aware that a new M might be blazingly faster but might also afflict you with a whole new set of headaches. Unfortunately your timing is terrible: it wouldn't make sense at this moment to invest in a leftover new Intel Mac, because Apple is definitively walking away from them, but the new M Macs are a potential minefield. So don't expect a completely smooth transition: you may get very lucky, or you may encounter various head-scratching issues.

    When we mention that old Macs can still be surprisingly useful, we don't mean specifically in your case, because clearly yours is not at all working for you even after you attempted to perk it up. Its just a general remark that for some purposes it can be a good idea to keep the old Mac as backup or addition to a new one. For example, I do all my video work in Windows (and other work in newer Macs), but my 2009 Mac Minis running Mac OSX 10.6.1 Snow Leopard get banged on several hours a day for web browsing and downloading. Despite a weak Core 2 Duo CPU, measly 2 GB RAM and puny 80GB HDD, they keep pace with my later PCs/Macs for many tasks involving web or PhotoShop. Only now, after nearly twelve years constant use, are they finally becoming less and less web compatible due to inability to load a browser newer than Firefox 48 (some popular sites crawl or don't load at all). OTOH, no problem downloading stuff yet. Would I recommend such an old Mini to you or anyone as main computer? Absolutely not, but it demonstrates the point that your deadly slow Mini experience isn't typical. You either have a hardware defect or failure from age, or you let it upgrade itself to a much newer version of OS than it can run without slowing to a crawl (Apple is way too optimistic about that).

    The portability of a MacBook is certainly appealing, but so is the price of a new Mini. What really puts me off to getting a Mini is that the one I have didnít run well off of the newer operating systems even in the earlier days that I had it. Unless Apple has done a tremendous rework on that kind of computer, Iím reluctant to ever buy another Mini. I donít want to ever end up in this kind of situation again.
    The current lineup of M Mac models share similar if not identical innards: the only difference is the laptops lack normal sized USB ports and have no HDMI port at all. No, I would not expect the laptops to have any advantage over the Mini or iMac in maintaining forward compatibility with MacOS updates. In todays market, it is unrealistic to expect the same decade-long useful lifespan we got from older Macs: Apple isn't interested in supporting that level of durability anymore. You must assume you'll need a new Mac after any future radical changes are made to the OS. The Mac platform is now on the same track as iPhones and iPads: essentially disposable consumer products to be replaced as necessary. It is what it is.

    The Apple and MacOS ethos of today is not the Apple of fifteen years ago. Beginning with OSX 10.7 Lion, things started to go off the rails with MacOS in terms of maintaining compatibility with older Macs. Depending on the Mac hardware configuration, sometimes you could barely get away with two major update cycles before everything went to hell. So no, there are no guarantees the new Mac you buy today won't start gagging and choking when the OS gets a significant update four years from now. The only ray of hope is that the new M hardware platform is so powerful to begin with, and required such a major revision of MacOS to accompany it, that Apple will probably pause to take a breath now and not do anything stupid to kneecap ability of the early Ms to run the next few OS upgrades (you should get at least five years use of an M you buy today).

    Iím just wondering if I will need 16GB memory in the long run if Iím not only planning to be doing some video work, but also attempting to get video off of streaming while using a VPN. Then again, I have no prior experience, so I donít know how much memory thatíll actually use.
    Its a really difficult choice, made more difficult by the fact the current M systems have no ability to upgrade memory or SSD: the specs you buy are the specs you're stuck with. While many buyer reviews indicate 8 GB memory is fine, a disturbingly large number of M owners are reporting deep regret they didn't spend more for the 16GB model. The M version of MacOS was engineered to use memory more efficiently, but as with many Apple plans it doesn't seem to work as predictably in the real world as they expected. Given that people are already having memory issues with 8GB today, I would definitely want the extra cushion of 16GB. Apple will likely fix these 8 GB memory problems with an M OS update within a few months, but then again they might not. They have been known to just bury early mistakes and pretend they never happened, stranding the first wave owners. Given these M models cannot be upgraded later, I would recommend you choose a 16GB model even if you have to take out a loan to do it. Better poorer but safer now than sorry later.

    Boiled down to the simplest advice: honestly, if I were in your specific situation I would just buy a recent but fairly cheap second-hand Intel Mini, say four years old, to tide me over until the M platform is fully established. That would be the wisest use of a tight budget during this time of radical change in the Mac platform. Lots of bang for the buck, and solves your immediate problem nicely. Loads of good used recent Minis for sale out there that will run the latest Intel MacOS.
    Last edited by orsetto; 27th Aug 2021 at 13:38.
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  23. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Maybe I missed it in this thread, but I don't see just HOW you upgraded your existing "poor" macmini.
    I mentioned this, because - the intel dead end notwithstanding - I work daily still with many macminis. Some are mid/late 2011/2012 era, but most have had their ram upgraded to 8 or 16gb, and drive upgraded to 256gb ssd. That alone, along with a wipe and clean install upgrade to newer/newest os version (that the hardware supports - varies), is often enough to enable them to run smoothly and while not SPEEDY they are not what one would call SLOW. Just pedestrian.
    If you upgraded, but not to that level, you did yourself a disservice. If you did up to that or higher level, and it still is as slow as molasses, you either have a lemon, a weaker/older machine, or you did something wrong.


    Scott
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  24. I don't know why some are so down on the M1, from the reviews I have seen they more than hold their own against much more expensive systems:

    https://youtu.be/GMzT3bajoPs?t=776

    https://youtu.be/d7Iv-G0p3SQ?t=336
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