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  1. This is it here: https://www.usa.philips.com/c-p/32PFL4664_F7/roku-tv-4000-series-led-lcd-tv

    On the box it was advertised, and some websites as 720p, but my devices such as my Xbox 360, PS3, Blu-Ray player, and PC can use 1080p on it.

    I ask because I want to know if it really is 1080p, or just upscaled from a lower resolution.
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  2. Member
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    It says this:
    Panel resolution
    1366 x 768p
    Presumably any 1080 media will be down-scaled
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  3. When I click OK on the remote it says 1080p on the screen.
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  4. Member DB83's Avatar
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    It is probably merely reporting on the source.


    You only have a maximum of 768 pixels in height. So you simply can not have a true 1080 pixel output.


    Flip through the display options|screen format >> Auto, Direct, Normal etc and see what happens to the display. Chances are that with some of these your picture will be larger than the display.
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    That's the program information
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  6. If that is true, then they shouldn't say it can use 1080p if it is only downscales video to 768p.
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  7. I changed the resolution of the 360 to 1360x768 and the picture looks smoother. In the 1080p setting the TV makes the images look less smooth and slightly pixelated. Sort of like a PC game without any filters running. I would have tried the PS3 but only supports the standard resolutions: 480p/720p/1080i/1080p.

    @DB83 The Auto and Direct options show the same amount of screen.
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  8. Member DB83's Avatar
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    It downscales to 720p.


    Now tell me what happens when you toggle those display settings as I discussed above.
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    Originally Posted by 60fpshacksrock View Post
    If that is true, then they shouldn't say it can use 1080p if it is only downscales video to 768p.
    Since most of broadcast TV is either 720p or 1080i, they keep the price of the TV lower by putting in a low-res panel,
    while the TV is still capable if showing the 1080 signal, albeit at the reduced resolution - so technically
    it CAN use 1080, it just can't display it as-is
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  10. @DB83 I did. No difference.

    If you mean the TV, it won't allow resolution changing.
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    Read up on 1:1 pixel mapping. https://www.google.com/search?q=1%3A1+pixel+mapping&rlz=1C1ASVC_enUS940US940&oq=1%3A1+...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    Unless your video source is 1366x768 or you use only a portion of your screen, you'll never be able to have 1:1 pixel mapping which gives you the clearest, most accurate image.
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  12. Originally Posted by 60fpshacksrock View Post
    I changed the resolution of the 360 to 1360x768 and the picture looks smoother. In the 1080p setting the TV makes the images look less smooth and slightly pixelated. Sort of like a PC game without any filters running. I would have tried the PS3 but only supports the standard resolutions: 480p/720p/1080i/1080p.

    @DB83 The Auto and Direct options show the same amount of screen.
    Downscaling isn't always perfect.
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  13. TV is 720p, source is 1080p.
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  14. Many retailers call this "the original HD". Since 720P was the first resolution to be considered HD. As mentioned above, broadcast HD TV is only 720P or 1080i. As said just above, you have a 720P TV. The ad has to say 1080P to get a true 1080P TV.
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  15. Capturing Memories dellsam34's Avatar
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    I'm surprised that they still make 720p panels, Could well possibly be an old stock of 1366 x 768 panels that they acquired for little to nothing and they fitted them with LED backlighting, Pretty interesting. The 720p resolution is useless nowadays except for the few TV channels that still broadcast at 720p or 720p youtube videos, That TV should not cost more than $50 in true value, Even 4K TV's now are like $250, bottom of the barrel though.
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    LCD screens are made in giant sheets and cut to final size. Defects such as dead pixels require making smaller screens to avoid them. This has always [been] one of the limitations of screen size. So what may have been planned as a 65" screen may have been cut down to multiple smaller screens. So yes, these are likely seconds from the manufacturing process. I wouldn't be surprised if they're somehow 4K screens using multiple pixels to form the equivalent of a single pixel.

    A Gen 5 sheet, from around 2003, is 1100 x 1300 mm, while a Gen 10.5 sheet is 2940 x 3370 mm (9.6 x 11 ft). The sheets of glass are only 0.5 - 0.7 mm thick or sometimes even thinner, so as you can imagine they are extremely fragile and can really only be handled by robots. The Hefei Gen 10.5 fab is designed to produce the panels for either eight 65 inch or six 75 inch TVs on a single mother glass. If you wanted to make 110 inch TVs, you could make two of them at a time.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/willyshih/2018/05/15/how-did-they-make-my-big-screen-tv/?...h=4aebf9aa1003

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/willyshih/2018/05/15/how-did-they-make-my-big-screen-tv/?...h=4aebf9aa1003
    Last edited by lingyi; 4th Aug 2021 at 11:39.
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