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  1. Member
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    I'm transferring a VHS tape (BASF E180 EQ) with regular domestic home movie recordings, recorded on an unknown VHS camcorder back in the days (may be a VHS-C camcorder).

    I'm using a JVC HR-S9600 for the transfer.

    I have an issue with audio interference which seems to come from an older recording to the tape. Is this possible? I was thinking perhaps the older recording was HiFi and the newer was Linear or vice versa.

    On my transferred video I can hear old tv recordings (English movies), low in the background. This does not come from the camcorder recordings because the background audio interference plays continuously despite of scene shifts on the homemovie recordings.

    I'm using a JVC HR-S9600, but this also shows up on other players. The JVC displays NORM during playback.

    Is this even possible or could there be some other explanation to this issue? Anything I could do to get rid of the English-movie-background sound? (I have many other VHS players, old and newer, but the issues has been heard on atleast 2-3 players already).

    Appreciate any input here.

    Thanks guys,
    Andy
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  2. This is common in reel-to-reel tape recorders where you have multiple channels recorded on adjacent longitudinal tracks. If the audio head is aligned incorrectly, then if you record over an existing track, then part of the original track might still remain.

    I suppose the same thing could happen with a VHS linear track.

    If the audio is there, you only have a few things to try.

    First is to try to force the playback machine to play only the linear audio ("normal" is what it is often called in the setup menu) and then if that doesn't work, force the playback machine to play the Hi-Fi audio. However, you may not have Hi-Fi audio, depending on the equipment used.

    The other "trick" is to play only the left or only the right channel. You may find that the bogus audio is less apparent or, hopefully, missing entirely in one channel. If so, just use the good channel and, when you save it, duplicate that into the other channel, resulting in a mono mix. Losing the stereo is a very small price to pay for such an improvement.
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  3. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Is the tape you are transferring a full size VHS that was dubbed from a VHS-C tape? Post an audio sample so members can assist.

    In any case it doesn't make sense since VCR's have a full track erase head for video followed by a second erase head for just the audio track and another erase head at the bottom of the tape edge for sync pulses. For the old recording to remain on the tape it has to escape two erase heads which seems odd to me.

    Two possible scenarios for that to happen, The full erase head is dirty at the top edge where the audio will be recorded AND the audio erase head is dirty as well leaving the old audio track partially erased, Or the full erase head is dirty at the top edge AND the audio erase/rec stack is miss-aligned leaving a small amount of the old recording.
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  4. Member
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    I will post a sample later today.

    One thought, could it be possible that the VCR that recorded the VHS-C tape was connected to an antenna cable and that the TV signal (audio) from the antenna somehow managed to wander over to this VHS-C to VHS dub while recording?

    Thanks for your input.

    Best,
    Andy
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  5. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    If the tape is tried in different VCR's and the problem is consistent there is nothing you can do about it, Try to apply some software frequency band pass filter to remove some the unwanted noise, Though it will not be successful as you may wish, don't expect miracles.
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  6. Originally Posted by wodfer View Post
    One thought, could it be possible that the VCR that recorded the VHS-C tape was connected to an antenna cable and that the TV signal (audio) from the antenna somehow managed to wander over to this VHS-C to VHS dub while recording?
    This seems the most likely cause, yes. The VCR that made this dub from the camcorder could have had some audio leakage between the tuner and line inputs. Unfortunately this would also be the most difficult issue to repair: the two sound tracks are permanently mixed together, making it difficult to suppress one without seriously compromising the other.
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  7. Now that was an issue I never heard of before or never had myself. I never knew that could be possible. I figured if you re-record over something on VHS, all of it is gone and written over. I never knew audio could be left behind under certain specific circumstances.
    This was certainly a learning experience for me.
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