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  1. Member
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    I remember in the 80's and 90's when one wanted to share a home video with family and friends he would connect the camera to a VHS recorder to create a copy to tape.

    A little before the end of the century he would create a copy on DVD to share.

    For high definition video he would share a Blu Ray disc, but there is a much cheaper alternative, AVCHD-DVD which is a standard DVD-R disc containing high definition video and can be played in a standard Blu Ray player.

    My question is, what is the alternative for 4K Ultra high definition video? Obviously it is not cost-effective to share a UHD Blu Ray, let alone I don't have an UHD BD-R drive in my computer. Is there any format that I can record 4K video on a standard 25GB BD-R disc, or even better a standard DVD-R disc? Does this format play on any standard UHD Blu Ray player? If I create a data disc with an AVI or MP4 or MKV file 4K video, does it play on a standalone UHD Blu Ray player? Does this plays automatically upon inserting the disc?

    I use several applications (Virtualdub, TMPGEnc, Nero Video, MultiAVCHD, IFOEDIT etc) to create a standard DVD-Video or AVCHD-DVD with the maximum possible bitrate (maximum quality). I want to know what is the equivalent of AVCHD-DVD when it comes to 4K video. Which application can produce that format? Is there an application that can produce the format WITHOUT recompressing the original video (without reducing quality) ? For HD video I use MultiAVCHD that can produce an AVCHD-DVD without recompressing the original video. This is much faster and preserves the original video quality. For DVD-Video I separate the original MPG file into elementary streams (M2V file for video and AC3 file for audio) and then use IFOEDIT to create the DVD files (VOB) without recompressing the original video.

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by spapakons; 10th Mar 2021 at 11:03.
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  2. I used to make AVCHD-DVD disks also, but found that the amount of AVCHD video that you could put on a DVD was limited.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by spapakons View Post
    I remember in the 80's and 90's when one wanted to share a home video with family and friends he would connect the camera to a VHS recorder to create a copy to tape.

    A little before the end of the century he would create a copy on DVD to share.

    For high definition video he would share a Blu Ray disc, but there is a much cheaper alternative, AVCHD-DVD which is a standard DVD-R disc containing high definition video and can be played in a standard Blu Ray player.

    My question is, what is the alternative for 4K Ultra high definition video? Obviously it is not cost-effective to share a UHD Blu Ray, let alone I don't have an UHD BD-R drive in my computer. Is there any format that I can record 4K video on a standard 25GB BD-R disc, or even better a standard DVD-R disc? Does this format play on any standard UHD Blu Ray player? If I create a data disc with an AVI or MP4 or MKV file 4K video, does it play on a standalone UHD Blu Ray player? Does this plays automatically upon inserting the disc?

    I use several applications (Virtualdub, TMPGEnc, Nero Video, MultiAVCHD, IFOEDIT etc) to create a standard DVD-Video or AVCHD-DVD with the maximum possible bitrate (maximum quality). I want to know what is the equivalent of AVCHD-DVD when it comes to 4K video. Which application can produce that format? Is there an application that can produce the format WITHOUT recompressing the original video (without reducing quality) ? For HD video I use MultiAVCHD that can produce an AVCHD-DVD without recompressing the original video. This is much faster and preserves the original video quality. For DVD-Video I separate the original MPG file into elementary streams (M2V file for video and AC3 file for audio) and then use IFOEDIT to create the DVD files (VOB) without recompressing the original video.

    Thank you in advance.
    There are technical issues with 4K video playback because many don't have equipment that can play it or display it at 2160p resolution.

    It is possible to put a limited amount of 4K video on BD-R (25 GB) or BD-R DL (50 GB) at reduced quality using HEVC at Blu-ray bitrates but regular Blu-ray players can't play it. Many computers won't play it either because they don't have Blu-ray drives or don't have GPUs that can decode 4K HEVC using hardware. Some UHD Blu-ray players can play data discs containing HEVC video but not all can and their requirements for playable video and audio vary.

    DVD isn't a workable solution for UHD video because of bitrate limitations plus there is still the problem of finding something that can play the discs, just as there is with Blu-ray media.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 10th Mar 2021 at 11:41.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
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  4. Downscale to HD then make an AVCHD DVD. Nobody will notice the loss of resolution. And nobody want's to watch more than 20 minutes of your home video at a time anyway.
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  5. USB sticks in the 32-64 GB range are dirt cheap....
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  6. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Downscale to HD then make an AVCHD DVD. Nobody will notice the loss of resolution. And nobody want's to watch more than 20 minutes of your home video at a time anyway.
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    I want to archive my 4K videos on disc, not only share them. I have read about Sony's XAVC-S format, but I am not sure if this is supported by all UHD Blu Ray players, even non-Sony models. Which application can create XAVC-S from a 4K video file? Thanks.

    Sony's XAVC-S seems good, but I want to know if I can playback it on non-Sony devices. Is that true or it is Sony only compatible? Also if I simply burn a DVD-R disc with a single 4K video file (and low bitrate so not to exceed maximum DVD playback speed), can I play it on a standalone UHD Blu Ray player? I don't want to use a computer all the time, let alone I currently don't have such fast computer to natively play 4K at 60fps.

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by spapakons; 13th Mar 2021 at 05:13.
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  8. Member Belike's Avatar
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    Hi there
    Just rip the DVD to even a Blu Ray ISO image and then on the client computers / Other type Amazon sticks etc install which will play the content without any problem.

    You need initially to rip / de-crypt the original DVD / Blu Ray disc -- software like Slysoft's software (or whatever they call themselves these days). This works absolutely 100% = de-regionalises and de-crypts DVD's so it will do that - then using KODI on the client devices the DVD will play (including all its menus etc).
    Last edited by Belike; 17th Apr 2021 at 14:11.
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    You probably didn't read the original question. I do not want to distribute 4K videos, I want to make a hard copy on disc. Unfortunatelly, I do not currently have a standalone UHD Blu Ray player to try, but I guess creating a data disc with an MKV of MP4 or AVI file could work. I have a 4K TV though, and I could test some files on USB to see which formats are best supported.
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    Originally Posted by spapakons View Post
    I want to archive my 4K videos on disc, not only share them. I have read about Sony's XAVC-S format, but I am not sure if this is supported by all UHD Blu Ray players, even non-Sony models. Which application can create XAVC-S from a 4K video file? Thanks.

    Sony's XAVC-S seems good, but I want to know if I can playback it on non-Sony devices. Is that true or it is Sony only compatible? Also if I simply burn a DVD-R disc with a single 4K video file (and low bitrate so not to exceed maximum DVD playback speed), can I play it on a standalone UHD Blu Ray player? I don't want to use a computer all the time, let alone I currently don't have such fast computer to natively play 4K at 60fps.

    Thank you in advance.
    The XAVC-S consumer format uses long GOP H.264/AVC at resolutions up to 3840 2160, and uses either AAC or LPCM for the audio in an mp4 container with a maximum bitrate of 50 Mbps. The XAVC professional format uses level 5.2 of H.264/AVC. None of the references that I found provide information about the H.264/AVC level used for XAVC-S but it may well be 5.2 at UHD resolution.

    Regarding Sony UHD Blu-ray players, I need to replace an LG Blu-ray player that is no longer able to recognize Blu-ray discs, and I think I will buy a Sony UBP X-700 UHD Blu-ray player even though I don't have a UHD TV yet. The Sony UBP X-700's manual says that it supports H.264/AVC at up to level 5.2 and plays H.264 and AAC audio in an MP4 container. The specs don't list H.264 and LPCM audio in an MP4 container as a playable combination. The UBP X-700 can support frames rate of up to 60 fps for AVCHD (MPEG4/AVC) only. It supports up to 30 fps for other video codecs. The UBP X-700 can support video bit rates up to 40 Mbps.

    It is hard to predict which non-Sony UHD Blu-ray players support playing video files with those specs. Some UHD Blu-ray players don't support playing video files at all.
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    The powers that be have decreed, for better or worse (WORSE), that

    1. Consumers now want to capture to ssd/flashmemory (using primarily phones), store in the cloud or local pc-based storage, and share via the cloud.
    2. Consumers now play their recordings as straight, un-authored, data files, using whatever system they have available (usually phones/tablets, but also laptops, desktops, and even some dedicated consumer settop boxes or direct via the display's built-in players).
    3. Manufacturers still haven't allowed for legit, inexpensive consumer forms of authored UHD BD, so that standardized avenue of sharing is unavailable. (Remember THAT 6 year old thread?)

    Therefore,
    @OP, if you are wanting to archive your 4k/UHD HEVC videos, just archive them. Take them, as-is, and put the files in the cloud, on HDDs, or on optical discs as plain data files.
    If you do want to share them, ask your recipients what they can accept and convert copies to that/those format(s).
    If you want to view them yourself on more mundane equipment, ask yourself what that equipment can accept and convert COPIES to that/those format(s).

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    OK, so far I understand there is no equivalent to AVHCD for 4K video, except possibly for XAVC-S which doesn't play on non-Sony devices. The only option, which I'll try as soon as I have a standalone UHD Blu Ray player, is to burn a standard data DVD-R or BD-R with the 4K video file in it and try if that plays on the player. That's what I thought, but I hoped there is a better solution. Anyone knows anything different, please do tell, thank you in advance.

    I hadn't have a true 4K video file to test, so I upscaled a 1920x1080 video file containing a TV advertisement to 3840x2160 and copied that on a USB flash drive. I tested on my Samsung 4K TV and it did play the MKV format (and I think the MP4 as well), so hopefully if I sometime buy an UHD Blu Ray player it will also play from USB. It may also play from a disc containing the 4K video file. To create the file I used VirtualDub to upscale and compress with x265vfw (HEVC) and the audio was Dolby Digital using the AC3ACM codec. This created the AVI version. I then used AVS Video Converter to create the MKV and MP4 versions with similar settings. If I did not want to lose any quality, I could also open the AVI file in AVI Demux and then export to MKV or MP4 without recompressing the video and audio streams.

    Thank you for your help so far.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Downscale to HD then make an AVCHD DVD. Nobody will notice the loss of resolution. ...
    He's right, you'd need a screen the size of a wall to notice the difference.
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  14. Originally Posted by Hoser Rob View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Downscale to HD then make an AVCHD DVD. Nobody will notice the loss of resolution. ...
    He's right, you'd need a screen the size of a wall to notice the difference.
    Also keep in mind tha 4K camera's don't really have 4K of resolution. Manufacturers all exaggerate the true resolution. The nature of the beyer pattern sensors guarantee that. So a 4K camera's true resolution is closer to 2K than it is to 4K (regardless of the 4K frame size). So reducing the frame size to 2K, especially if you use a sharp resizing algorithm, only reduces the effective resolution by a small bit.
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  15. Member DB83's Avatar
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    I will not link to it but I subscribed to an Only Fans source that promoted 'downloads'.


    The problem was that the original upload that becomes the download was 4k and, I guess, the majority of 'viewers' could not watch that download (the web views were fine)


    So the OP really needs to realise that not all targets to the native view can actually watch it as a download.


    Upload it, as in the example I mention, to Google-Drive and one might get a proper experience since the player, certainly in the example I experienced, will alter the playback accordingly to the internet speed of the recipient.
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