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  1. Hi
    I want to upscale some DVD's to BLU-RAY using Topaz AI Video. The software will turn the video both progressive and interlace into thousands of TIFF images then enhance them one by one. I've tried to learn about AviSynth+ and FFmpeg with limited success.

    My specs:
    Win 10, i9-9900k, 64GB ram, Nvidia 2070 super, 8TB ssd 4TB nvme.

    My work:
    Mostly anime.

    What software is available that can stitch the TIFF images back into a H.264 or H.265 codec, ready to be burned to BLU-RAY?
    I need something that encodes and authors in one go. I don't want to re-encode if possible for quality reasons.

    Would TMPGEnc Authoring Works 6 be good or DVD Architect Studio? Is there any software that stands out for quality and ease of use?
    I have not found any good tutorials that cover this.

    I realise many of you are tired of answering newbie questions , but this is important to my mental health, I need a project right now. My country is in lock-down until July so any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you
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  2. Member
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    "stitching" is the wrong term. You can make a video from many images with FFmpeg, have a look here: https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Slideshow
    You can also do it with the free version of Davinci Resolve.

    Michael
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  3. Thank you for the response,
    I did'nt think anyone would answer. I've heard good thing about FFmpeg but I have not seen a tutorial that explains things. One came close, but then he skipped the FFmpeg bit as if everyone knows about colour space and framerate.

    I am trying, but its not easy finding your way out of a hedge maze in the dark. Is Davinci Resolve well regarded on the forum? Is the quality excellent? I don't mind paying for a simple high quility piece of software.

    Thanks again.
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    Originally Posted by jedi55 View Post
    I've heard good thing about FFmpeg but I have not seen a tutorial that explains things. One came close, but then he skipped the FFmpeg bit as if everyone knows about colour space and framerate.
    If your operating system is Windows, I can give you an example for a FFmpeg script. What are the filenames of the images? The size (width*height) of the video shall be the same as the size of the images, right?
    As an introduction see also my book: http://www.astro-electronic.de/FFmpeg_Book.pdf

    Originally Posted by jedi55 View Post
    Is Davinci Resolve well regarded on the forum? Is the quality excellent?
    Yes it's excellent but it has so many functions that you don't know where to begin. You need a good book or watch many video tutorials.
    The free version of Davinci Resolve is sufficient for what you want to do.

    Michael
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  5. VirtualDub2 can automatically append multiple TIFF files into a video.
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  6. Hi,
    Sorry for the delay I was trying to read the book. So you literally wrote the book on FFmpeg
    Davinci Resolve does look good but overwhelming. VirtualDub2 is much easier to work with.
    I think I've worked out the code I need in FFmpeg, is this correct?

    ffmpeg -r 50..00 -f image1 -s 1440x1080 -i %06d.tiff -vcdec libx264 crf 0 -pix_fmt yuv420p

    I've experimented with StaxRip and QTGMC trying to deal with interlace in the smartest way possible.

    Will I need to re-encode when I insert chapter points?

    Thanks
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  7. Originally Posted by jedi55 View Post
    Hi,
    Sorry for the delay I was trying to read the book. So you literally wrote the book on FFmpeg
    Davinci Resolve does look good but overwhelming. VirtualDub2 is much easier to work with.
    I think I've worked out the code I need in FFmpeg, is this correct?

    ffmpeg -r 50..00 -f image1 -s 1440x1080 -i %06d.tiff -vcdec libx264 crf 0 -pix_fmt yuv420p

    I've experimented with StaxRip and QTGMC trying to deal with interlace in the smartest way possible.

    Will I need to re-encode when I insert chapter points?

    Thanks

    You should enter chapter points when you encode. An IDR (real keyframe) has to be inserted for BD at chapter points for navigation. This is usually done with a QPfile. There is a utility called chaptergen that can help with this, but the qpfile name/path has to be entered in the x264 encoding string

    CRF 0 is incompatible with BD. You should use BD compatible settings if you're going to author it on a disc (a real BD with menus, compatible on a BD player) . Not a "data disc"
    https://sites.google.com/site/x264bluray/home

    You should use "Rec709" to convert back to YUV, assuming that's what you used to convert to the TIFF images , otherwise there will be a color shift

    1440x1080 @50fps is incompatible with BD . The highest resolution @ 50p is 1280x720 . The other option is to make it interlaced 1920x1080i25 (50 fields/second interlaced) if you need the temporal resolution

    None of those tools "author" a disc . You still need to author it with something like DVDA, Encore (discontinued) . TSmuxer can, but without menus.
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  8. davinci resolve:
    Find the size of your images (aspect ratio)
    Open DV Resolve.

    Gear wheel icon bottom right, set custom aspect ratio and choose your fps for timeline and playback
    (make them the same fps, you must set fps before importing media)

    Along the bottom of the window, use the media tab to import the image sequence (typical folder tree left hand pane) drag the sequence to the bottom window.
    If you can't manage that, open file explorer and drag and drop to the bottom window of the media pane.

    Go to the edit tab, use the media pool top left, drag sequence to timeline, play and or edit to your hearts content.

    Head to the deliver tab, choose your output and render. job done

    Dv Resolve is brilliant for image sequences as long as you can cope with H264 (in the usual containers)

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Virtual Dub would be a good choice, very flexible with some basic filters.

    File/ Open Video, make sure 'linked segments' is checked
    It may take a moment to import, especially tiffs.

    Video tab, set frame rate
    Video tab set compression, choose your desired compress
    Save video as
    Job done.
    Last edited by super8rescue; 28th Feb 2021 at 10:17.
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by jedi55 View Post
    Hi,
    I think I've worked out the code I need in FFmpeg, is this correct?
    ffmpeg -r 50..00 -f image1 -s 1440x1080 -i %06d.tiff -vcdec libx264 crf 0 -pix_fmt yuv420p
    Try this command line:
    ffmpeg -framerate 25 -i %06d.tiff -r 25 -y out.mp4

    If you start FFmpeg from a Windows batch file, you must replace "%" by "%%".
    The -framerate option tells FFmpeg how fast to read in the pictures.
    The -r option is the output framerate. The default is 25, so you could omit this option is 25 is ok.
    The -framerate and -r values can be different. If -r is larger than -framerate, then images are duplicated if required. If -r is smaller, then some images will be skipped.
    In this case it's unnecessary to specify the video codec because h264 is the default.

    Michael
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  10. Hi
    Won't I lose %50 of the quality by discarding the frames. I thought doubling the framerate preserved the quality of interlaced content. Most of the DVD's are 4:3 ratio hence the 1440x1080 when upscale. How do I keep the ratio and prevent distortion if I can't use that resolution?

    What is the lowest CRF that is valid for Blu Ray?

    I think Topaz AI Video does not include black bars when converting 4:3 video to images. If it did, I could use the standard 19201080 is there a way off inserting the black bars while authoring?

    Also some of the original framerates are strange 29.970 and 23.976.

    This is the link I'm using as a reference. Its not much but it's the closest I've got to explaining the basics.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZhgK-SBlFQ&list=FLTyayUx9dhiB3Y6SUt7tlfQ&index=36

    Would multiAVCHD be any good?

    Thank you all for your patience
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  11. Originally Posted by jedi55 View Post
    Hi
    Won't I lose %50 of the quality by discarding the frames. I thought doubling the framerate preserved the quality of interlaced content. Most of the DVD's are 4:3 ratio hence the 1440x1080 when upscale. How do I keep the ratio and prevent distortion if I can't use that resolution?

    What is the lowest CRF that is valid for Blu Ray?

    I think Topaz AI Video does not include black bars when converting 4:3 video to images. If it did, I could use the standard 19201080 is there a way off inserting the black bars while authoring?

    Also some of the original framerates are strange 29.970 and 23.976.

    This is the link I'm using as a reference. Its not much but it's the closest I've got to explaining the basics.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZhgK-SBlFQ&list=FLTyayUx9dhiB3Y6SUt7tlfQ&index=36

    Would multiAVCHD be any good?

    Thank you all for your patience




    If the DVD is theatrical such as Hollywood, or TV drama from North America (unlikely since you're using "50p"), it should be inverse telecined, not deinterlaced, and the original frame rate should be 23.976p

    If the DVD is from a UK drama series, it should be "25p"

    Only things like reality TV, sports, some concerts might be interlaced "25i" , or "29.97i" . Those have 50 fields/s or 59.94 fields/s and smooth motion

    All that proper preprocessing should have been done before VEAI, otherwise you'd get inferior results in VEAI



    Typically, 4:3 content is pillarboxed in 1920x1080 for BD, you can do that when encoding

    CRF is typically not valid for BD unless you specify vbv maxrate and buffer size. Uncapped CRF can result in peaks and buffer underflows for BD. It's not recommended for BD. Generally you want to do 2pass with VBV because you need an exact filesize for authoring (fixed media size), this will result in better quality and even distribution. "Capped" CRF with VBV can lead to artifacts

    Multiavchd can work, but it's depreciated for many years . It can accept avs scripts (you can open image sequence in the script), so you'd only have to encode once
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  12. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    For BD, 1920x1080 is typical, but 1440x1080 is allowed per the spec (as well as 720p & SD rez). Much here depends on which encoding & authoring app you are using. AFA bitrate goes, there shouldn't be much difference between either one, as pillarbox bars take up almost no bitrate.


    Scott
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  13. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    For BD, 1920x1080 is typical, but 1440x1080 is allowed per the spec
    1440x1080 is only allowed as 16:9
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  14. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I apologize - PDR is correct. Ignore what I wrote above and return to your scheduled programming. That option was clearly meant for HDV and similar non-square assets.
    Certainly wouldn't want to have it be stretched out to 16:9!



    Scott
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  15. Tank you all for your help.

    I see I still have alot to learn.
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