VideoHelp Forum


Try NordVPN to access Netflix or other streaming services from any country and also surf safely!
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 19 of 19
Thread
  1. I have a media player that has the 2 TB limit. Can someone explain to me why several devices can't get beyond that 2 TB limit and why are they not evolving to get past it? Thanks in advance for your responses and perhaps I am not the only one that wonders about these kind of things.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Search Comp PM
    It is a guess,But could be a 32 bit limit.Its A bit like the 32 bit version of win xp had a probllem over 2 gig.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Originally Posted by butterw View Post
    FAT32 partition size limit ?
    There's also a 2 TB BIOS MBR limit on boot partitions with older motherboards, regardless of format.
    Last edited by jagabo; 3rd Jan 2021 at 10:14.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    The problem could be related to the media player's hardware, its operating system, or the file system used for formatting storage.

    Android-based media players use an SoC and an operating system that was originally used for smartphones. How many people use more than 2TB of storage for their smartphones?
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
    Quote Quote  
  5. Yes, drives larger than 2TB need to have GPT partitioning.
    Quote Quote  
  6. It seems if you hook a USB hub up to a media player you can hook up several hard drives to it and you just select which one you want to play videos from. This doesn't get you past the 2 TB limit but it may be of useful.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18M4WsdFmjM

    This is the media player I bought it about three years ago. It has been a wonderful way of watching videos.

    https://www.amazon.ca/AGPtek-Full-HD-Digital-Player-Drives/dp/B00TOAAHG4/ref=pd_day0_5...XSA4G6YACTD2FF
    Last edited by Tom Saurus; 5th Jan 2021 at 08:44.
    Quote Quote  
  7. There are some reports on the internet that usb hubs can damage hard drives so maybe they are not a good idea after all.
    Quote Quote  
  8. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Tom Saurus View Post
    There are some reports on the internet that usb hubs can damage hard drives so maybe they are not a good idea after all.
    Just bad/cheap hubs.
    USB ports on computer cases are just hubs.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    Originally Posted by Tom Saurus View Post
    There are some reports on the internet that usb hubs can damage hard drives so maybe they are not a good idea after all.
    Just bad/cheap hubs.
    USB ports on computer cases are just hubs.
    Yes, just look up some mainboard and you will find USB Hub Chips in the shematics.
    for example: page 7 on this high end x570 motherboard
    https://download.gigabyte.com/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_x570-aorus-xtreme_1001_190708_e.pdf
    Quote Quote  
  10. I think the bigger issue is that USB hard drives are susceptible to being knocked around while they're running. And USB powered drives may not get enough power to work reliably from some ports. Cheap USB cables can cause a significant drop in voltage. Many devices can't supply the specified minimum of 0.5 amps. And the connectors aren't all that reliable with devices that are moved around a lot.
    Quote Quote  
  11. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    I think the bigger issue is that USB hard drives are susceptible to being knocked around while they're running. And USB powered drives may not get enough power to work reliably from some ports. Cheap USB cables can cause a significant drop in voltage. Many devices can't supply the specified minimum of 0.5 amps. And the connectors aren't all that reliable with devices that are moved around a lot.
    ...and generally a lack of adequate cooling.
    Quote Quote  
  12. Originally Posted by Clockwork View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    I think the bigger issue is that USB hard drives are susceptible to being knocked around while they're running. And USB powered drives may not get enough power to work reliably from some ports. Cheap USB cables can cause a significant drop in voltage. Many devices can't supply the specified minimum of 0.5 amps. And the connectors aren't all that reliable with devices that are moved around a lot.
    ...and generally a lack of adequate cooling.
    Yes, I forgot about that one.
    Quote Quote  
  13. https://www.amazon.ca/Player-Digital-Coaxial-Control-Keyboard/dp/B07WPY8VKL/ref=pd_sbs...7WPY8VKL&psc=1

    This seems to be an evolution in the media player field. However after reading certain things in the comment section I would be worried about hooking an hard drive up to it. I like though that is can play .h265 files and that it will accept up to an 8 TB hard drive. But unless I win the lottery I don't have the money to experiment with this device. So I will stay away from this device but perhaps more devices will show up in the marketplace.
    Quote Quote  
  14. If you can access your video collection via a WiFi network share the new Chromecast with Google TV is a good option at US$50. I have one now and it's a pretty impressive device, especially at that price point. The UI is fast, it plays almost everything up to 4K at 60Hz h.264 and h.265, and only consumes 2 or 3 watts when active. The only negatives are the lack of AV1 support and a somewhat anemic remote (no dedicated pause/play button, for example). And one other negative...

    It's less attractive if you plan to move a hard drive around from device to device -- because it has only one I/O port (USB C) and it's used by default to power the device. If you wish to use the USB-C port for I/O you need to connect a powered USB-C hub and a more powerful power supply. That brings the cost up and leaves you with a Frankenstein mess of cables and devices. But with the hub it's possible to connect a keyboard, mouse, external drives, game controllers, etc.
    Quote Quote  
  15. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    If TomSaurus prefers to keep using Ethernet, there is an adapter for the Chromecast with Google TV that supplies both Ethernet and power https://store.google.com/us/product/chromecast_ethernet_adapter_gen_2 Some routers allow attaching a USB HDD or USB Flash Drive to share with other devices on the network. To supplement the remote, I am using an Android-compatible Bluetooth keyboard + touchpad which I have paired with the Chromecast.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord, Snoopy329
    Quote Quote  
  16. Originally Posted by Tom Saurus View Post
    This is the media player I bought it about three years ago. It has been a wonderful way of watching videos.

    https://www.amazon.ca/AGPtek-Full-HD-Digital-Player-Drives/dp/B00TOAAHG4/ref=pd_day0_5...XSA4G6YACTD2FF
    You can use a USB enclosure that contains a bridge chipset which supports 4k sector re-emulation in order to access a 2.19TB+ hard drive using MBR.

    I use just such an enclosure with an old media player that only supports MBR, with a 12TB drive.

    Bridge chipsets supporting this feature were very common towards the end of the XP era. Even WD used them in their external hard drives to support 2.19TB+ on XP.

    They are much less common now. The StarTech SAT3510BU3 supported this feature for years, and was very popular so you may be able to find a used one. Last year I purchased a Sabrent enclosure that supported this feature, but it may be shipping with a different version of the firmware now.

    Buslink still actively markets external USB drives that are formatted with 4k sector re-emulation, as "XP Compliant" drives. For example; this one.

    If using this type of solution, note that the drive must be formatted in the device (that contains the bridge chipset supporting 4k sector re-emulation), and then can only be accessed in that device (or another enclosure that supports 4k sector re-emulation). It can't be accessed directly through the sata port again unless reformatted with standard sectors.

    If you choose this solution to use with your particular media player, you should use an enclosure that is externally powered.
    Last edited by blimey; 22nd Jan 2021 at 03:14.
    Quote Quote  
  17. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    If TomSaurus prefers to keep using Ethernet, there is an adapter for the Chromecast with Google TV that supplies both Ethernet and power https://store.google.com/us/product/chromecast_ethernet_adapter_gen_2
    Yes, I should have mentioned that. I wanted the option of connecting other devices so I bought a hub with power delivery, multiple USB 3 ports, Ethernet, etc.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads