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  1. Basically, I've already captured a bunch of SD video files and would like to transfer them to a properly authored Blu Ray disc. The video files are currently saved as mp4 files with x264 encoding, 720x480 resolution, and 29.97 frames per second (interlaced, so 59.94 fields per second). Whenever I try to import the video files into DVD Architect, though, the program doesn't seem to like their format and will always re-encode the video, no matter what I do to tweak the files beforehand, and DVD Architect takes an eternity to re-encode them. I'd like to speed this process up somehow, and I've read on another site that DVD Architect may not be able to accept interlaced source videos without re-encoding in the first place.

    Any tips? Is there a more convenient authoring program that I should be using for this? (Preferably something that allows me to save a disc image for testing before burning, and something that supports up to 128 GB discs.) Any command that I should be using on ffmpeg to ensure that the video files can be smoothly imported into a Blu Ray disc project? (Which is what I've been using to adjust files for DVDA, to no avail so far.)
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  2. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    It depends one how advanced you want the menus to be.

    I used to enjoy making menus in the DVD era. I made some real masterpieces, using Ulead DVDWS2 (Win) or DVD Studio Pro (Mac).

    I do a lot of menu-less authors now, I just want the content on a disc with chapters. For that, I use TMPGEnc Author Works. The menus are really basic, but I'd done a few when needed. Most people, even myself, now are fine with menu-less.

    The days or disc artwork, case artwork, and menus, are behind us. It was fun at the time, artistic, but ultimately nobody cares. A software menu is fine, if a menu at all.

    If you want to give me a tiny sample, I'll load it in TAW and see if it likes it.
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  3. Thanks for the quick answer. I'll get around to trying out TMPGEnc after I handle a few errands today.

    I can relate a lot about the menu and presentation stuff. Sometimes I still have fun tinkering with it all but at this point I'm more than fine with something minimal and functional. This is mostly intended for my parents anyway, who won't really care about presentation as long as it works and doesn't ruin the already-questionable VHS quality even further.
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  4. You may want to try BD Rebuilder.
    You can import your SD files and it will re-encode as necessary only for blu-ray compliant outputs, ready for burning to a disc if needed. You can also add basic menus for navigation.
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    Originally Posted by Sixfortyfive View Post
    Basically, I've already captured a bunch of SD video files and would like to transfer them to a properly authored Blu Ray disc. The video files are currently saved as mp4 files with x264 encoding, 720x480 resolution, and 29.97 frames per second (interlaced, so 59.94 fields per second). Whenever I try to import the video files into DVD Architect, though, the program doesn't seem to like their format and will always re-encode the video, no matter what I do to tweak the files beforehand, and DVD Architect takes an eternity to re-encode them. I'd like to speed this process up somehow, and I've read on another site that DVD Architect may not be able to accept interlaced source videos without re-encoding in the first place.

    Any tips? Is there a more convenient authoring program that I should be using for this? (Preferably something that allows me to save a disc image for testing before burning, and somethin
    The starting files are not BDMV-compliant. They are going to force a re-encode into a BDMV-compliant resolution and framerate, and deinterlacing, no matter what software product you use if you are trying to create a BluRay. That is BDMV format.

    Your files are actually DVD-compliant, I believe. So if you were willing to transfer them to DVD instead of BDMV (obviously much less capacity per blank media disc), I think you could avoid the re-encoding. Of course if they're currently interlaced the only way to avoid re-encoding is to write them as interlaced. If you wanted to deinterlace then they'd have to be re-encoded.

    No free lunch here. Your starting format MP4 files are simply in a format requiring re-encoding for BDMV, and all the time that takes. Give DVD output a try.
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  6. I'm already decently impressed with the TMPGEnc software after a few minutes of using it. I noticed that it doesn't have any target size options for media greater than 50GB though. It has a "custom" option but that seems to max out at 2GB for some reason. If I just pick "None" here will it at least let me make a huge disc image without complaining about it?

    Originally Posted by DSperber View Post
    The starting files are not BDMV-compliant.
    Which is why I asked for advice regarding ffmpeg (perhaps a specific command that would be a best fit for encoding Blu Ray compliant SD NTSC video), which is much faster at encoding than DVDA.

    TAW doesn't take a terribly long time to encode something acceptable though, so I can probably make due with that.
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  7. Originally Posted by DSperber View Post
    The starting files are not BDMV-compliant. They are going to force a re-encode into a BDMV-compliant resolution and framerate, and deinterlacing, no matter what software product you use if you are trying to create a BluRay. That is BDMV format.
    How do you know for sure? The OP's video format 720x480i29.97 is perfectly blu-ray compliant. There might have been x264 encoder settings though which did not produce a fully compliant stream (buffer management, GOP length, bitrate constraints). Only the OP knows what his settings were.
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  8. Originally Posted by Sixfortyfive View Post
    ....Which is why I asked for advice regarding ffmpeg (perhaps a specific command that would be a best fit for encoding Blu Ray compliant SD NTSC video), which is much faster at encoding than DVDA.
    Blu-ray compliant settings for x264.exe are found here:
    https://sites.google.com/site/x264bluray/
    Perhaps not exactly what you have been asking for (using ffmpeg), but at least stable and proven.
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  9. Originally Posted by Sharc View Post
    Blu-ray compliant settings for x264.exe are found here:
    https://sites.google.com/site/x264bluray/
    Perhaps not exactly what you have been asking for (using ffmpeg), but at least stable and proven.
    Yeah this is the site I offhandedly referenced that just outright says that DVDA will reject interlaced x264 files without re-encoding:
    https://sites.google.com/site/x264bluray/issues-with-certain-players

    No matter what flags I threw after -x264opts (making sure bluray-compat was used, various SAR values to see if forcing 8:9 or 10:11 made any difference), I wasn't really making any headway on this.

    I think I'll be fine using TAW instead for authoring and re-encoding as needed, although I'd still be interested in a legit ffmpeg encoding command that I could use in the future to make this a bit more streamlined.
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  10. You will be tinkering with ffmpeg forever to get exactly the right combination to create files that can be authored without further encoding. Let TAW do its thing. It's very good and well optimized. It already uses x.264.
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  11. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    If the files are dvd compliant then they will be blu-ray compliant with no need for re-encoding needed.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  12. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    h.264 is not DVD compliant. The proper way of doing it is if he would have captured lossless, de-interlaced with QTGMC with the option to keep 29.97 fps and feed the lossless files to a Blu-ray authoring software for compliance encoding and aspect ratio setting, this would yield the least amount of degradation. But since he has already encoded the files a significant quality hit is unavoidable.
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  13. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    H.264 is dvd compliant if the blu-ray player plays avchd format.,
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  14. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    I've always known DVD format is MPEG-2 so maybe you are referring to Blu-ray with DVD as in digital video disc not the DVD format.
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  15. Next time, save capture to avi then use x264 cli to get bd compliant stream. For now just throw them on BD as data, bd player will still play it. just saving you the headache.
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