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  1. Living Oxymoron Pendell's Avatar
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    I am trying to assemble DVDs for my cousins made from Digital8 tapes of theirs. After importing a tape with WinDV, I have a series of files which break at every timestamp jump for more than 1 second.

    I know how to concatenate these files into a single "title" for AVStoDVD using ffmpeg's concat function, but I would like to somehow create a list of chapter breaks (at every file) that I could use, so each skip of a chapter takes you to the next recorded clip in a title instead of some arbitrary number like 5 minutes.

    I have the list.txt file generated to be used with ffmpeg's concat command, but I don't know if I would need something more than that... better yet, is it possible for ffmpeg itself to insert chapter data into an AVI file, and for AVStoDVD to recognize that immediately?

    I really hope I don't have to do this manually is all I'm saying...
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  2. I don't know WinDV, but with Scenalyzer, you can choose to NOT have it create a new file every time the timecode is interrupted.
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  3. Living Oxymoron Pendell's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
    I don't know WinDV, but with Scenalyzer, you can choose to NOT have it create a new file every time the timecode is interrupted.
    That is a feature in WinDV as well, you simply have to set a certain value in settings to instead of 1. I can recapture as a single file if I wanted, but that still doesn't solve my problem. I want to somehow let AVStoDVD know where to put chapter markers, with some kind of script I can run, instead of having to do so manually.
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    Try this in AVStoDVD. Load the clips
    tools/join source titles (the program will offer to create chapters at the joins)
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  5. This may or may not help, but here goes.

    I use Vegas to edit. When I get ready to export my work, regardless of whether it is to DVD or MP4 or something else, I first add my markers on the timeline. I then set the timeline timecode to match what other applications expect (e.g., seconds, frames, SMPTE code, etc.). I then cut/paste those chapter markers into the other application.

    In addition, when Vegas encodes/renders to a file, it offers the option to embed the markers into the video file.
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  6. Let me get this straight.
    You transfer D8 into clips, then you want to use the clips to make 1 title on DVD in AVS, so you join the clips and you want the joining points to be the chapters generated somehow automatically?
    The easiest option would be, if ffmpeg was outputting the timecodes of where the joining is made in the resulting large output, alternatively.
    Or, you can take short clips, put them into timeline of Vegas (I use Vegas, try Davinci, it's free from what I have heard) next to each other in one video track, put markers on every place new clip starts, export that as chapter points (IN ABSOLUTE FRAMES format, it will be easier to add to AVS), then exit, then join the clips into one, go to title properties in AVS, Chapters tab, export existing 5 min chapters, replace the chapters points in the txt file with the chapter points you generated in NLE, import that corrected chapters file into AVS and there you go. Let me know, if you can do that and if anything is unclear.
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  7. If the OP or anyone else uses Vegas, I have over a dozen different script that will automatically add markers. These are then converted by Vegas to chapter markers when you use the "Render As" option, or you can export their timecode to some other app using copy/paste. My scripts can create markers/chapters at each event; at each point where the underlying media changes; at specified intervals; and more.
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