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  1. Member
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    Im a wee bit confused
    I read that some player switch between analog and digital and thus give 5.1 output but most only have 2 analog output jacks
    then i read that some unit have a digital coaxial out put so that makes a lot more sence
    but if one was to run these output into a digital input of a amplifier wiould that operate correctly
    I have a built in decoded 5.1 output

    now the next if one was to rip a movie with a dongle that would only be stereo at best so how does one rip the digital 5.1 and get it in synce with the recorder picture

    the reason for these silly question is there are a few great movies that has come out in bluray but only stereo
    hell there must be a simple way to do this job
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  2. Just as VHS evolved to have two completely different audio systems in the same VCR (linear and HiFi), LaserDisc evolved so that some of the later premium players have two or even three distinct audio systems in the same unit: standard stereo analog audio, PCM digital stereo audio (as in CDs), and a further variation being 5.1 surround which broke compatibility with the original LaserDisc analog audio standard.

    The whole history of LaserDisc audio formats is too convoluted to repeat here, but the gist is very few players could directly output 5.1 in a manner that is easy to capture to a PC. Usually one needs to add a couple of hardware accessories not commonly required for standard stereo laserdisc or vhs capture.

    Detailed explanations can be found at LaserDisc enthusiast sites such as this one:

    http://www.precisionlaserdisc.com/newfaq.html
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  3. Member
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    Thank you for those detail
    Yes it's easy to use a dongel to get video and analog to RIP to a computer

    What model laser player can do that with 5.1

    The question that's is not answered in what I have read on a laser player they say the sound can. Be switch between analog and digital. By the remote control
    But there are only two rca audio terminal on the rear of the units
    5.1 out of these I would have though impossible
    The next if a player has a optical out put can that be directly
    connected to the imput of a normal amplifier
    Last edited by xenon1; 29th Sep 2020 at 18:15.
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  4. Member
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    The differences in audio output is explained the the article linked above. In a nutshell, there are three ways 5.1 could be obtained from an LD player. Modding, built in requiring an RF demodulator and direct optical out. Pricewise, it's fairly expensive because of the cost of the mod, expensive because 5.1 was typically included only in top of the line models, and very expensive because those with direct optical out are high end, rare elite models. Off the top of my head you're probably looking at hundreds of dollars for the lower end models and thousands of dollars for the elite models like the HLD-X0 and HLD-X9.

    Visit the lddb.com (LaserDisc Database) forum for more info. They'll now about the different players and requirements.
    Last edited by lingyi; 29th Sep 2020 at 20:33.
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  5. Sorry, I forgot actually there are four different LaserDisc audio formats, not three: analog stereo, PCM digital stereo, Dolby AC3 digital surround multiplexed into (replacing) the right analog channel, and DTS surround which some discs have in place of the plain PCM digital stereo tracks. Throw in the matrix 4-channel Dolby surround you can extract from many "stereo" LDs, and you could even argue there were five laserdisc audio formats. Its all very confusing: when I still owned an LD player, I simply stuck with the analog or PCM stereo options and never bothered with the surround. Capturing the surround data to a PC is something I never explored, but you should be able to find posts from members here that have performed such transfers. Just search for topics like " capture laserdisc DTS surround audio to my PC".

    Standard analog stereo and analog matrixed 4-channel surround are both output thru the ordinary L + R stereo audio jacks. PCM digital stereo audio can go thru the digital output to your receiver or PC, and the player will also send an analog version thru the analog L+R jacks.

    Of the discrete surround options, I imagine the easiest to capture would be DTS, because any laserdisc player with a digital output connection will automatically transmit the DTS data thru its optical or coax PCM connection if you load a DTS movie. Dolby AC3 would be trickier: this was digital data stored as an analog signal on the disc, and output as raw FM signal thru a dedicated AC3 jack on AC3-equipped players. Converting that signal back into digital required an accessory demodulator box or a receiver with compatible AC3 input and its own built-in demodulator. How and where one would tap into that chain to capture the digital AC3 signal I have no idea, but others have surely posted about it here on VH and elsewhere.

    The capture workflow and required hardware/software would depend on the specific laserdisc you wanted to get onto your PC. Neither AC3 nor DTS surround can be captured with the standard small USB video dongles: you would need a dedicated internal capture card or external box that can accept the optical or coax digital surround signal and capture it to your PC hard drive alongside (or separately from) the video signal. While doable, this is not nearly as easy as capturing a simple stereo VHS or laserdisc directly thru the dongle in a single session.

    There were only 180 or so DTS titles, most of which almost certainly have been re-released as DVD and/or BluRay updates with the same or enhanced surround tracks. Approx 1200 AC3 laserdiscs were available: again the majority have been re-released as DVD or BluRay updates, but of the 1200 there may be some that did not yet receive proper replacements. Its unlikely you could make a PC capture from a laserdisc that would look as good as a studio-remastered DVD or BluRay: make absolutely certain the title you want to capture hasn't recently become available with surround sound before making the effort.

    More on LaserDisc AC3 and DTS:

    https://laserdiscs.discdude.net/faq.htm

    https://forum.lddb.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=7901

    https://forum.lddb.com/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=7438
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  6. Or, forget everything I said earlier and look at this link to plunge right into some capture suggestions:

    https://forum.lddb.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=6224

    Wouldn't attempt it myself, but then there aren't any LaserDiscs I loved that are unavailable as DVD/BD updates with tolerable soundtracks. I mean, I enjoyed Jurassic Park as much as anybody, but I'm not so OCD about it that I'd spend a huge amount of time and effort ripping the laserdisc DTS track and re-syncing it with the improved video from the BluRay.
    Last edited by orsetto; 29th Sep 2020 at 20:50.
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  7. Member
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    I found a laser player it has the following audio outputs
    an optical sound out
    stereo pair outs
    1,2
    i/o port svideo 7 pin
    vhf adapter video and mono


    I dont have aproblem with grabing the video to the computer and or stereo sound \

    I dont have the remote for the yamaha I guess thats required to switch to digital


    would this capture the optical sound to the computer via an audio recorder program
    6 Channel 5.1 Sound Card SPDIF External USB Audio Output Adapter Optical for PC

    if so it just might be possible if both video and sound was captured at the same time it might be able to sync

    Some one sugged a old capture card that has optical in but there as scarse as hens teeth \
    im looking for the specification of this unit but as yet cant find them or the operational manual \
    cvd870 Yamaha

    just notised a seperate rca jack that been added up by the audio inputs , on opening the case its a mod on the sound card ,but dont have the knoledge to know what it for
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  8. The Yamaha CDV-870 is a fairly uncommon player, very little discussion of it at LD enthusiast sites. I've seen the remote: it doesn't have any direct audio controls, just a menu button, so you'll find those options buried in the onscreen menu. You could probably manage without the remote: laserdisc players automatically route the correct signal to the correct output jacks (if you load a DTS disc, DTS surround will feed thru the optical output, an ordinary PCM digital stereo disc will also send digital audio thru the optical jack). All you would need an audio control for is selecting a commentary track or otherwise fooling with the analog outputs. The remote model name is Yamaha CDV Remote VP48260, you can find them for about $28 on eBay.

    The VHF adapter video, mono audio and DC power jacks are typically ignored: a small box containing an RF modulator could be snapped onto them for those needing to play their LDs to an old TV that could only accept RF input on a blank channel. But anyone still using a TV that old and basic probably has no need of a laserdisc player to begin with: those modulator jacks are like a human appendix.

    The two sets of analog stereo outputs are identical, they are duplicated for convenience in case you want to hook up your TV speakers and a separate amplifier simultaneously.

    The RCA video jack would be the standard video connection, the S video connection may or may not look better depending on the player, the disc and the TV or capture device (there are some quirks in the way laserdisc players handle video that make RCA vs S-Video connections less predictable than with VCRs).

    The optical jack would normally be what you'd need to tap for the digital DTS surround signal (only available from DTS laserdiscs), or standard stereo PCM digital signal.

    The extra RCA jack is one of two aftermarket modifications: either a Dolby AC-3 surround RF tap, or coaxial digital output alternative to the built-in optical out. The only way to tell which one it is would be to hook that jack to the digital input of a receiver and see if you get sound: if not, its an AC3 RF tap meant to patch thru an outboard demodulator. If you do get sound thru your receiver, its a standard coax digital connection, which would probably be a little easier/more convenient for DTS capture than the optical output. Like the DTS output, AC3 output is automatic: if this RCA modification is for AC3, the player will always route the AC3 signal thru only that extra jack, only when an AC3 disc is loaded.
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  9. Member
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    I really apreciated all the work you have done for me

    The question would that part I named in the last Reply
    Let me record the digital tracks from the disc at 5.1 in a file
    And be comparable with the video being recorded at the same time by a grabber dongle unit
    As I see it that way it should be able to sync
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