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  1. Member Deter's Avatar
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    Understand it is hard to find good working AG 1980 VCR's.

    Have been restoring these VCR's for about 10 years now.

    The method:
    All the boards are rebuilt and the video card as well.
    Than replace all the capacitors in the machine.
    (Than any other adjustments that needs to be done)

    Panasonic used a string of capacitors and resistors that do go bad over time. So it is almost impossible to find good working units. The few shops that repair these, well they don't fully rebuild the machine, so 6 months to a year you start seeing problems again.

    This service which is being provided to the community is rare.

    If you use Videohelp, Digitalfaq, or any video website and you are in to VHS capture you really need an AG 1980 as part of your collection.

    Base Repair rate per unit $500 + Shipping Rates

    Common Problems:
    Dim display
    Noise in the picture
    Random streaks of noise
    Blue noise in the picture
    Humming noise from the machine
    Color shifting and not able to hold a stable color
    Faulty TBC
    Power Supply Issues
    Issues in the Video Card
    Loading Problems
    Fade to Black & White

    Final notes:

    If you own an AG 1980 and you need it repaired you can PM my account. If you want to buy a machine on Ebay or Amazon and ship it direct to repair, I can do that.

    The AG-1980P produces a better picture than the standard AG-1980. If you are buying these online make sure you purchase the AG-1980P it makes a big difference. You can find the AG-1980P markings on the serial number.

    At this point in time can pretty much repair anything from Betamax to Broadcast decks to JVC's to AG-1970's.

    It takes 1 to 3 months to restore these units.

    All transactions are done via paypal and no payment is ever do until the machine is fixed.

    If for some reason I can't fix the VCR than you owe nothing.

    Thanks,
    Deter
    Last edited by Deter; 12th Sep 2020 at 12:29.
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  2. Member
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    Good to hear you're repairing these valuable machines again! Thank You!!
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  3. Just have to ask, what makes this particular VCR so great?
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  4. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by sophisticles View Post
    Just have to ask, what makes this particular VCR so great?
    This has been discussed many times in the past.
    - TBC
    - DNR
    - EP/SLP
    - VHS-C

    It's not perfect, no VCR is. Artificial sharpness issues, colors can be off, luma can run hot. And bad caps. It's a solid deck, but re-breaks after some years, needs another costly repair. But hard time find better decks.

    JVC should be first tool in the VCR chest, but this Panasonic is next (for NTSC, it's the FS-NV200 for PAL).
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  5. Member Deter's Avatar
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    On the JVC stuff, personally will now only use the JVC 9900 or the 9911, they are the best JVC decks and the only issue you get with those machines is a plastic gear under the video drum that gets stuck or breaks. Than the machine will not work and goes in to auto mode.

    The audio on the AG-1980 is a lot better than the JVC stuff. The color issues comes from bad capacitors.

    The JVC 9900 produces a really nice bright color with the AG Unit you can't get that look unless you adjust them in an external color filter. SLP and LP tapes work so much better in the AG-1980 and you also have a sharpness slider bar to manually adjust.

    The AG1980P vs the AG1980 you get much better colors and a better overall picture.

    As far as these VCR's vs the other VCR's that we all owned back when we used VCR's, it is a night and day difference.
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  6. Originally Posted by Deter View Post
    The AG1980P vs the AG1980 you get much better colors and a better overall picture.
    Have you worked on its fraternal twin, the AG5710P?

    Would you rate the 5710P performance indistinguishable from the 1980P?

    I've got a pile of half-dead 1980P and 5710P, and one functioning 1980P: none of my 5710P worked correctly long enough for me to compare comprehensively.
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  7. Member Deter's Avatar
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    Have not tried AG5710P if it is a clone machine that is not a problem, the restoring concepts are the same. I've done AG-1970's which those units don't have a video card that is the only difference. Half dead units doesn't matter either. Worn out or bad video heads or broken plastic gears are the only things that matter cause then you need two machines to build one.

    For myself I rebuilt a Sony 2100 Betamax and that unit had no power.
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  8. Thanks for the quick reply: yes, the AG5710P is 90% identical to the 1980P. It came out a year or two later as an "upgrade" (more expensive) version of the 1980 optimized more for broadcast and post-production environments than consumer/prosumer.

    AFAIK the video board, PSU and other key internals are the same, but Panasonic significantly modified the 5710 to differentiate it from the 1980. The 5710 has no tuner, no wireless IR remote capability, no front panel AV connections, and no nine-pin socket for the budget A96 edit controller. In exchange, it has a large multipin RS-232C port with DIP switches to interface with "pro" edit controllers and PC-driven systems of the era. The rear panel also adds a connector for a simple throwback wired remote, and a couple odd option switches for repeat play, sensor recording, and a kill switch that prevents HiFi audio recording (linear track only).

    Just checked the rear serial number plate of my three dead 5710s: all three have the "P" suffix, suggesting they have the 1980P improvements you mentioned above, so perhaps that answers my question. One of my 5710P is still semi-functional, aside from balky loading and a tendency to add white snow to any dark scenes in recordings made from Time Warner Cable (oddly, this added noise does not manifest in any other off air or dub recordings with night scenes). If I can get the damned thing to actually load a reference tape again, I might be able to directly compare it to my one functional 1980P. Probably academic, since it makes more sense to have the better known and far more popular 1980P rebuilt than a 5710P that might be harder to resell/recoup later on.
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  9. Member Deter's Avatar
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    PM my account I will fix the three 5710P dead units. If it is a part problem I would have at least 3 units to build two. These things are going to mint you are going to be shocked.
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