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  1. Member
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    I have a bunch of PAL VHS tapes which I'd like to convert to digital format. I plan to do it on a Windows 10 machine which has a Blackgold BGT3520 DVB-T2 capture card (with S-video input). The PC has NO firewire interface. I have Magix Vegas Pro v16, and also Ulead Video Studio v10.
    I also have other hardware which may or may not be of use:
    - Canopus ADVC-100
    - Panasonic DMR-BWT720 BluRay/DVD/HDD Recorder.
    What would be the best approach to doing the conversion, in terms of both hardware and software?
    My first thought was to connect my VHS player to the Panasonic recorder, record to DVD, then use DVD Decrypter to convert from DVD to a digital file. While connecting the player to the Blackgold card would seem simpler, I imagine having all sorts of issues with drivers and compatibility.
    Any views of what the best approach would be?
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  2. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Connect the VCR to the DVD recorder analog input and the DVD player analog output to the Blackgold DVB-T analog input and capture using vdub first, if problems arise use one of the apps you already have, capture lossless and encode later to H.264. The DVD player will act as TBC.

    Canopus ADVC-100 and DVD drive are outdated techniques of handling analog video and should no longer be used.
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    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    Connect the VCR to the DVD recorder analog input and the DVD player analog output to the Blackgold DVB-T analog input and capture using vdub first, if problems arise use one of the apps you already have, capture lossless and encode later to H.264. The DVD player will act as TBC.

    Canopus ADVC-100 and DVD drive are outdated techniques of handling analog video and should no longer be used.
    Many thanks for the advice. If I have driver/software compatibility issues with the Blackgold card, would I lose much in quality if I write it to DVD then run it through DVD Decrypter?
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  4. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Yes, The compression to MPEG-2 is lossy, but if that's the only way so be it.
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    Originally Posted by itm2 View Post
    I have a bunch of PAL VHS tapes which I'd like to convert to digital format. I plan to do it on a Windows 10 machine which has a Blackgold BGT3520 DVB-T2 capture card (with S-video input). The PC has NO firewire interface. I have Magix Vegas Pro v16, and also Ulead Video Studio v10.
    I also have other hardware which may or may not be of use:
    - Canopus ADVC-100
    - Panasonic DMR-BWT720 BluRay/DVD/HDD Recorder.
    What would be the best approach to doing the conversion, in terms of both hardware and software?
    My first thought was to connect my VHS player to the Panasonic recorder, record to DVD, then use DVD Decrypter to convert from DVD to a digital file. While connecting the player to the Blackgold card would seem simpler, I imagine having all sorts of issues with drivers and compatibility.
    Any views of what the best approach would be?
    The question in your title has been asked and answered hundreds, possibly thousands of times here and at digitalfaq.com. The short answer is a good recommended VCR, good recommended capture device, good recommended external Time Base Corrector (TBC), good capture software, time learning the proper capture and editing techniques.

    Your setup will give you fair to good at best.

    If you're serious about learning the "Best approach to converting VHS to digital?", read and thoroughly digest this article: http://www.digitalfaq.com/editorials/digital-video/professional-analog-workflow.htm Everything in the article except the camera and multiple pieces of hardware applies to home video capture.
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    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post

    The question in your title has been asked and answered hundreds, possibly thousands of times here and at digitalfaq.com. The short answer is a good recommended VCR, good recommended capture device, good recommended external Time Base Corrector (TBC), good capture software, time learning the proper capture and editing techniques.

    Your setup will give you fair to good at best.

    If you're serious about learning the "Best approach to converting VHS to digital?", read and thoroughly digest this article: http://www.digitalfaq.com/editorials/digital-video/professional-analog-workflow.htm Everything in the article except the camera and multiple pieces of hardware applies to home video capture.
    Thanks for the pointer. I guess the essence of my question was: what is the best approach given the hardware and software that I already have - sorry I should have been clearer. I wasn't planning to throw cash at this to get a top result, as the videos are not priceless family heirlooms or anything like that - mostly just old football games!
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    So after a day of trying I gave up trying to get the S-Video input to work on the Blackgold card. Instead, I managed to find an EasyCap USB video interface which I must have bought a few years ago. This seems to deliver OK video and audio quality (capturing using VDub as recommended above, via the Panasonic to do the TBC), but the video and audio are way out of sync. Any idea how I can correct this?
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    ...oh and both the video and audio play back at too high a speed (and with noticeable variation in audio pitch). This is not true of the source VHS when viewed directly.
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  9. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    You are capturing in the wrong format or your tapes are not PAL, Post some screen shots of your software and hardware.
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    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    You are capturing in the wrong format or your tapes are not PAL, Post some screen shots of your software and hardware.
    Images of hardware and software here:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/JJmv4Gy97p85tvAa7

    I don't think the format is a problem, as if I capture using Ulead Video Studio the audio and video sync is fine (but the audio and video quality is much worse)
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    After making no progress with Vdub I tried burning the video to a DVD-RW, then ripping it and converting to mp4 using Handbrake. The video quality was much better than I got from Vdub (or Ulead Video Studio), and there were no audio sync issues, so I think I'll stick with this approach.
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  12. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    It's impossible that a lossless capture (if done right) looks worse than capturing to DVD and converting to mp4, But as a last ditch try this guide:
    http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-capture/7427-capturing-virtualdub-settings.html
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    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    It's impossible that a lossless capture (if done right) looks worse than capturing to DVD and converting to mp4, But as a last ditch try this guide:
    http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-capture/7427-capturing-virtualdub-settings.html
    Yes I guess if I had a better PC video interface than the EasyCap USB I might get better results, but the loss in video quality vs copying and ripping from DVD is more than I would have imagined. The sharpness and colour resolution is so much better.
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  14. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Yes certainly the easycap a.k.a easycrap is not the right tool for the job.
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    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    Canopus ADVC-100 and DVD drive are outdated techniques of handling analog video and should no longer be used.
    Are you saying that this combination is outdated or the ADVC-100 in particular.

    I have been using one of these devices successfully for capturing analog video and your comment has me curious.
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    Originally Posted by BlankTape View Post
    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    Canopus ADVC-100 and DVD drive are outdated techniques of handling analog video and should no longer be used.
    Are you saying that this combination is outdated or the ADVC-100 in particular.
    I have been using one of these devices successfully for capturing analog video and your comment has me curious.
    DV boxes are the best tech money could buy ... in the era of Pentium II and III computers. The 1990s. Back when a "big" hard drive was 2gb, and something like a (now laughably puny) 100gb hard drive was unthinkable, a dream. When 256mb of RAM was huge.

    You're using 20-25 year old methods. It doesn't matter than it "still works" (aka, hardware install on a current OS). The problem is the transfer quality is pitiful. Reduced color, blocks, noise.

    I prefer the term "legacy" for things like Windows XP, but DV is just plain damned old/ancient tech.

    Newer HD tech is also the wrong tool.

    This is the 3 bears, sort of. Too old, too new, just right. You tried too old (DV) and too new (Blackmagic), so try again.
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