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  1. Member
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    Jun 2020
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    Arizona USA
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    I have DVDs and Blu Rays that need to be backed up and compressed to make available to my home network (storing on a separate device). Generally ripping discs to MKV temporarily before encoding to MP4 with H.264 video and passthrough audio (single stream). Trying to stay as compatible as possible for legacy and future players by using 30fps constant framerate and the H.264 codec. If it matters, I'm also burning in subtitles.

    My ripping gets ahead of my conversion pretty quickly with several movies queued in Vidcoder while encoding either one or two jobs at a time.

    Here's the meat of the problem...
    Intel QSV was enough to speed up DVD conversion, but Blu Ray is a beast. I'm hoping a new-ish video card will help. There's absolutely no 3D gaming on this PC. Would like to stay below $250 in cost.

    Current hardware:
    • i7-4770 @ 3.4GHz (4 cores, 8 threads)
    • Intel HD 4600 integrated video
    • PCIe 2.0 on the motherboard (from what I've read 3.0 cards will "work," but I'm sure there's an upper limit where buying something bigger won't help because of this bottleneck)
    • 8GB RAM (expandable to 16GB, but don't anticipate that need)
    • Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu Ray drive

    Here are my main speed goals:
    • Casual Blu Ray encoding (want it take only about twice as long as current DVD encoding that's at 30 minutes for a 2 hour movie)
    • Blu Ray encoding that involves noise handling in old movies with a lot of grain (a job went from 2 hours to 12 hours when I enabled a few noise detection features)

    My main question was between ATI and Nvidia, but I welcome suggestions and declarations from personal experience regarding specific models, etc.

    Cheers!
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  2. Member
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    When I say ATI, I mean AMD.

    These are the two Wikipedia pages I've been living in for days, trying to make sense of the cards of the last few years (both used and 'new'/retail).
    • List_of_AMD_graphics_processing_units
    • List_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units
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  3. Member
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  4. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Intel QSV was enough to speed up DVD conversion, but Blu Ray is a beast. I'm hoping a new-ish video card will help. There's absolutely no 3D gaming on this PC. Would like to stay below $250 in cost.
    You already have a Intel CPU with H.264 Quicksync ability. Handbrake supports it I think, maybe Vidcoder too. I don't think a GPU card will fix your bottleneck if QS isn't enough.

    If you want Nvidia, here is a list of which card supports what and how many encoder chips they have. https://developer.nvidia.com/video-encode-decode-gpu-support-matrix

    For AMD, a list of what is supported can be easily found here, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Video_Decoder#Format_support

    Blu Ray encoding that involves noise handling in old movies with a lot of grain (a job went from 2 hours to 12 hours when I enabled a few noise detection features)
    Noise reduction? You aren't going to get much quality noise reduction from Hardware.

    If you do buy a GPU card, just buy the cheapest card that has the encoding ability you want. Like the Nvidia 1050 or the AMD RX 550.
    Last edited by KarMa; 5th Jun 2020 at 02:31.
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  5. Member
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    My stock HP power supply didn't have a 6-pin connector, so I upgraded that ever so slightly to install a PNY GeForce GTX 1650 XLR8 OC.

    Wow. I'm blown away. After tinkering with some settings, NVEnc combined with QSV decoding is nothing short of incredible.

    At 3 to 5 minutes, encoding a DVD movie to mp4 takes less time than updating and lightly tweaking its subtitle file. Bluray is sped up to about 4x.

    Frustration levels have subsided greatly. Populating the digital collection is fun again.
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  6. Member
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    I've done a fair amount of encoding over the past week with the new setup. So far I'm not seeing any additional noise/artifacting from the use of hardware acceleration. If there's a file size increase, I haven't noticed. And I might not notice it since my little 3TB NAS is far from full with nearly 300 movies. The DVDs are 1800k and BDs at 2400k (both mp4/h.264). Quite a few TV episodes too.
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