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  1. How come in some UHD 2160p the A/R fits my whole tv (ex. Knives Out ) and in most others the A/R is 235:100? Is there something I need to look for in order to view in full screen? While using MPC-HC in Output/ "enhanced video renderer" I can not change the A/R. I can only change the A/R while in "System Default". Also the color in "enhanced video" looks a little orange , and if I use "system default" it won't play the video for UHD or 2160p? Ok well I think that is 3 questions, so any help would be appreciated.
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    Your TV is 16:9.

    You have three options. 1. Stretch your video vertically to fill the screen, which would make everything too tall and distorted. 2. Zoom in and lose the sides of the video. 3. Or watch the movie as is in it's true aspect ratio. Ideally in a properly darkened room so the letterbox bars on the top and bottom blend into the background of the room.

    Your version of Knives Out is No.2, either mastered that way or a flag on the video has caused your player to zoom in, as the aspect ratio is 1.85:1 https://www.google.com/search?q=knives+out+aspect+ratio&oq=knives+out+aspect+ratio&aqs...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    Aspect Ratios: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)
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  3. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    ...so any help would be appreciated.
    This is a non-issue. You watch the film in its original aspect ratio - the ratio in which it is meant to be seen. If that means black bars above and below, then so be it.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Your version of Knives Out is No.2, either mastered that way or a flag on the video has caused your player to zoom in, as the aspect ratio is 1.85:1 https://www.google.com/search?q=knives+out+aspect+ratio&oq=knives+out+aspect+ratio&aqs...hrome&ie=UTF-8
    If that movie fills his screen, my guess is it's because of his television's overscan. Or maybe he doesn't notice the small black bars.
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  4. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    ...so any help would be appreciated.
    This is a non-issue. You watch the film in its original aspect ratio - the ratio in which it is meant to be seen. If that means black bars above and below, then so be it.

    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Your version of Knives Out is No.2, either mastered that way or a flag on the video has caused your player to zoom in, as the aspect ratio is 1.85:1 https://www.google.com/search?q=knives+out+aspect+ratio&oq=knives+out+aspect+ratio&aqs...hrome&ie=UTF-8
    If that movie fills his screen, my guess is it's because of his television's overscan. Or maybe he doesn't notice the small black bars.
    No I didn't notice with Knives Out, now I see what you are referring to. LIke I said i can not make any adjustments to the A/R when playing in "enhanced video renderer". I would not want to ruin it, so yes this is not an issue. I was just wondering if anyone knew a way to configure MPC-HC while in "enhanced video renderer", bc while in that mode all the settings are greyed out. I was also wondering how to adjust the color in MPC-HC while in that mode, it looks a little orange.I see what you mean though in the difference in the A/R with Knives Out. So when you buy any 2160 UHD Blu-ray, there are black bars mostly too?

    Thank you for your responses.
    Last edited by forsure; 29th May 2020 at 09:35.
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    Read the link to I posted in my first post. There are several different theatrical aspect ratios, none of which are 16:9 which was chosen as a compromise for HDTVs. Unless the video was created for TV viewing, you'll always have the black (letterbox) bars on the top and bottom, especially on UHD releases which are intended to give you the closest (for now) image as shown in the theatre.

    I don't use MPC-HC, but I'm guessing that the "enhanced video renderer" setting is intended to give you optimized video settings and that's why most of the settings are grayed out. If the video is too orange on all your videos, it's likely you have to adjust your TV, not the player.
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  6. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Read the link to I posted in my first post. There are several different theatrical aspect ratios, none of which are 16:9 which was chosen as a compromise for HDTVs. Unless the video was created for TV viewing, you'll always have the black (letterbox) bars on the top and bottom, especially on UHD releases which are intended to give you the closest (for now) image as shown in the theatre.

    I don't use MPC-HC, but I'm guessing that the "enhanced video renderer" setting is intended to give you optimized video settings and that's why most of the settings are grayed out. If the video is too orange on all your videos, it's likely you have to adjust your TV, not the player.
    I think it's the player with the color b/c, it does not look like that on "system default" nor with just watching tv. My friend told me he watched "1917", streaming from Uverse, and the A/R was 16:9 or full screen. I guess Uverse converts the A/R auto? I wish I could do that, b/c I do not like the bars. I pay for the whole tv, I should be able to use all of it. Yes I read the link you sent me, it helped me understand further.
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  7. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    My friend told me he watched "1917", streaming from Uverse, and the A/R was 16:9 or full screen. I guess Uverse converts the A/R auto? I wish I could do that, b/c I do not like the bars. I pay for the whole tv, I should be able to use all of it. Yes I read the link you sent me, it helped me understand further.
    1917 was shot digital on Arri cams and was cropped differently for theatrical release and IMAX. It is entirely possible that the version that went to HBO (Uverse) contained more image information than the theatrical release or the IMAX release -- but you're not going to get there with the source material you have.

    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I pay for the whole tv
    You also pay to see the film presented as intended.
    Last edited by smrpix; 29th May 2020 at 12:27.
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    @smrpix

    IMDB lists [I]1917[/I] as 1.90:1 or 2.39:1 for the IMAX verison.

    Forgot about unmasking/reformatting movies for streaming/broadcast. I won't rant about it, but it's one of the many pet peeves of mine. Thankfully, disc releases don't do that.


    "I pay for the whole tv, I should be able to use all of it." I'm not mocking you, but the variations of this phrase is has been posted by so many others here. Names vary by brand, but these are the options for my set to get a video to fill the screen.

    "Use the arrow buttons to scroll through and select the desired aspect ratio. Options include Full, Just, H-Fill and Zoom. Select “Full” if you want to stretch the image horizontally across the entire screen to get rid of the black bars on the sides. Select “Just” to stretch the image evenly to the four sides of the screen. Select “H-Fill” to increase the horizontal image; however, this option cuts off part of the image on the right and left side. Select “Zoom” to increase the entire size of the image; however, this option cuts off part of the image on all sides. The menu closes automatically once you make your selection."

    Note that only the "Just" setting gives a "pixel for pixel" image, that includes the black bars on the top/bottom or sides, but retains the full video as intended. Every other setting distorts the video in some way.
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  9. Good points, thanks for the responses.
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  10. Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    My friend told me he watched "1917", streaming from Uverse, and the A/R was 16:9 or full screen. I guess Uverse converts the A/R auto? I wish I could do that, b/c I do not like the bars. I pay for the whole tv, I should be able to use all of it. Yes I read the link you sent me, it helped me understand further.
    1917 was shot digital on Arri cams and was cropped differently for theatrical release and IMAX. It is entirely possible that the version that went to HBO (Uverse) contained more image information than the theatrical release or the IMAX release -- but you're not going to get there with the source material you have.

    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I pay for the whole tv
    You also pay to see the film presented as intended.
    I guess I just don't understand the purpose of intending to show less information especially for a Blu-ray release. I don't go to the movies that often, but don't remember seeing the black bars in the theaters. My friend also said that all movies he watches on Uverse are in full screen, regardless of what the original A/R was.
    Last edited by forsure; 29th May 2020 at 12:56.
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    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You also pay to see the film presented as intended.
    I guess I just don't understand the purpose of intending to show less information especially for a Blu-ray release. I don't go to the movies that often, but don't remember seeing the black bars in the theaters. My friend also said that all movies he watches on Uverse are in full screen, regardless of what the original A/R was.[/QUOTE]

    As smrpix stated, disc releases are intended to present the film as intended. In the early days of DVD, before 16:19 TVs were common, some movies were released on double-sided discs with one side letterboxed and the other side 4:3 pan & scan. Eventually people got used to the idea that they were seeing the movie as intended instead of missing up to half the image.

    As for U-verse, I suspect they're streaming the movies that way for people like you vs those who prefer their movies be presented the proper way. If the movies are unmasked to reveal a part of the video that wasn't intended to be seen, you're getting 'more of the image', but losing the artistic intent of the director. And if you've ever seen the tops of the heads of crew members on the bottom of the screen or boom mikes appear on the top, distractions that take you out of the the viewing experience, you'll probably appreciate letterboxing. If they're not unmasked, they zoomed in and you're losing more of the image on the sides.
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    My friend told me he watched "1917", streaming from Uverse, and the A/R was 16:9 or full screen. I guess Uverse converts the A/R auto? I wish I could do that, b/c I do not like the bars. I pay for the whole tv, I should be able to use all of it. Yes I read the link you sent me, it helped me understand further.
    1917 was shot digital on Arri cams and was cropped differently for theatrical release and IMAX. It is entirely possible that the version that went to HBO (Uverse) contained more image information than the theatrical release or the IMAX release -- but you're not going to get there with the source material you have.

    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I pay for the whole tv
    You also pay to see the film presented as intended.
    I guess I just don't understand the purpose of intending to show less information especially for a Blu-ray release. I don't go to the movies that often, but don't remember seeing the black bars in the theaters. My friend also said that all movies he watches on Uverse are in full screen, regardless of what the original A/R was.
    You don't remember seeing black bars in the theater because:
    1. The theater is dark and you couldn't distinguish black on black.
    2. Even if you could, most theaters have CURTAINS used to hide those black bars and dynamically adjust the resulting "screen" to match the AR of the movie.

    Your TV isn't a fluid device - it cannot morph to wider or narrower size. So on TVs, you MUST choose an AR for the frame of the TV, and in old days it was 4:3 to mimic closely the frame of the old 4:3 movies. Modern HD TVs are 16:9, as that is the best compromise for showing both 4:3 material AND widescreen material (of any aspect ratio).
    If it bothers you, you could put up motorized curtains in front of your TV to match showing only just the content.

    Scott
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  13. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I guess I just don't understand the purpose of intending to show less information especially for a Blu-ray release.
    Less? When you see the black bars above and below, it means you're getting the entire film, top to bottom and left to right. What you want to do results in 'less information' being seen.
    I don't go to the movies that often, but don't remember seeing the black bars in the theaters.
    Because they have curtains that mask off the unseen portions of the screen.
    My friend also said that all movies he watches on Uverse are in full screen, regardless of what the original A/R was.
    A number of channels do this. The Sci-Fi channel and HBO are notorious for this. There's no accounting for stupid.
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  14. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I guess I just don't understand the purpose of intending to show less information especially for a Blu-ray release.
    Less? When you see the black bars above and below, it means you're getting the entire film, top to bottom and left to right. What you want to do results in 'less information' being seen.
    I don't go to the movies that often, but don't remember seeing the black bars in the theaters.
    Because they have curtains that mask off the unseen portions of the screen.
    My friend also said that all movies he watches on Uverse are in full screen, regardless of what the original A/R was.
    A number of channels do this. The Sci-Fi channel and HBO are notorious for this. There's no accounting for stupid.

    "It is entirely possible that the version that went to HBO (Uverse) contained more image information than the theatrical release or the IMAX release ". I was saying less b/c he said "contained more info". Well imo it looks stupid with black bars on the tv or wherever. Like someone else pointed out,many people feel this way about the bars. Sure I'll get a curtain, and that will definitely be less of an eye sore.
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    This subject has been discussed many times in this forum. My LG TV has a zoom button that can expand the picture
    in different ways, either stretch top to bottom and obliterate the original A/R making things look tall and thin,
    or zoom out until the picture fills the screen, maintain the A/R, but cuts off approx 25% of the left and right of the picture

    I guess peoples' brains work in different ways; even when you point out the artistic shortcomings of "making it fit"
    you don't get anywhere.

    There was a website I saw once before that used the movie "Seven brides for seven brothers" to highlight the problem -
    this movie is a good example, it was shot in ultra wide screen (2.50:1) and has those famous dance sequences that take up the whole
    width
    Last edited by davexnet; 29th May 2020 at 17:15.
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  16. Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    This subject has been discussed many times in this forum. My LG TV has a zoom button that can expand the picture
    in different ways, either stretch top to bottom and obliterate the original A/R making things look tall and thin,
    or zoom out until the picture fills the screen, maintain the A/R, but cuts off approx 25% of the left and right of the picture

    I guess peoples' brains work in different ways; even when you point out the artistic shortcomings of "making it fit"
    you don't get anywhere.

    There was a website I saw once before that used the movie "Seven brides for seven brothers" to highlight the problem -
    this movie is a good example, it was shot in ultra wide screen (2.50:1) and has those famous dance sequences that take up the whole
    width
    My brain working in a different way does not get the "artistic" point. It would seem logical that any and all aspect ratios would then be considered a form of art on top of art (being the movie itself). My Tv,Samsung Plasma does 4:3, "fit to screen", 16:9, and "wide". Always thought I should be in 16:9 before reading in this and other forums that "fit to screen" does not stretch the image like 16:9. I don't want to miss anything, but again to me black bars are eye sores. I would think that with today's technology they could account for everything that one would want or miss.
    Last edited by forsure; 29th May 2020 at 17:53.
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    Do theaters still have curtains? I'm pretty sure the multiplexes I've been to, though it's been years since I've been in one, don't have curtains.

    In Hawaii, I remember when theaters had stages and and extra set of curtains that could be drawn in front of them. Some of them were also used for stage performances. One, Hawaii Theatre (the spelling is intentional) went from being a stage theatre to a movie theater and has been restored as a stage theatre and movie theater.
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    Someone needs to do some research into the "black bars" phenomena - some people hate them and fortunately most don't notice and understand basic geometry. There's a PhD I'm sure
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  19. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Do theaters still have curtains? I'm pretty sure the multiplexes I've been to, though it's been years since I've been in one, don't have curtains.

    In Hawaii, I remember when theaters had stages and and extra set of curtains that could be drawn in front of them. Some of them were also used for stage performances. One, Hawaii Theatre (the spelling is intentional) went from being a stage theatre to a movie theater and has been restored as a stage theatre and movie theater.
    No offense, but I spent 7 months on Oahu and all they do there is swim in the water and barbecue. Almost 3rd world state to me. Doesn't surprise me that they would not have new stuff. I saw " The Gentlemen" last in the Imax on South Beach. Don't recall curtains or black bars. I remember seeing the whole screen and the whole movie covering the thing as intended imo. So on that note if they can do it in the theater then they should be able to do it on all releases without losing info.
    Last edited by forsure; 29th May 2020 at 18:05.
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  20. Originally Posted by netmask56 View Post
    Someone needs to do some research into the "black bars" phenomena - some people hate them and fortunately most don't notice and understand basic geometry. There's a PhD I'm sure
    Surely technology can defy basic geometry. " Most don't notice". Maybe more likely they are into the "artistic" nonsense, than can't tell.
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    This subject has been discussed many times in this forum. My LG TV has a zoom button that can expand the picture
    in different ways, either stretch top to bottom and obliterate the original A/R making things look tall and thin,
    or zoom out until the picture fills the screen, maintain the A/R, but cuts off approx 25% of the left and right of the picture

    I guess peoples' brains work in different ways; even when you point out the artistic shortcomings of "making it fit"
    you don't get anywhere.

    There was a website I saw once before that used the movie "Seven brides for seven brothers" to highlight the problem -
    this movie is a good example, it was shot in ultra wide screen (2.50:1) and has those famous dance sequences that take up the whole
    width
    My brain working in a different way does not get the "artistic" point. It would seem logical that any and all aspect ratios would then be considered a form of art on top of art (being the movie itself). My Tv,Samsung Plasma does 4:3, "fit to screen", 16:9, and "wide". Always thought I should be in 16:9 before reading in this and other forums that "fit to screen" does not stretch the image like 16:9. I don't want to miss anything, but again to me black bars are eye sores. I would think that with today's technology they could account for everything that one would want or miss.
    Well there's pan and scan, it was usually done to when converting widescreen to 4:3
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_and_scan

    By "artistic shortcomings" I just meant a presentation that deviates from what was intended by the film maker.
    But as you say, not everybody is bothered by this.

    In the past, supporters of the "full picture" and no black bars when shown the compromises that must be chosen
    in order to achieve it, either understood and accepted the compromise, or had a light bulb moment and had a rethink.

    At the end of the day. What compromise to the picture are you willing to accept to make it fill the whole screen?
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  22. Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    This subject has been discussed many times in this forum. My LG TV has a zoom button that can expand the picture
    in different ways, either stretch top to bottom and obliterate the original A/R making things look tall and thin,
    or zoom out until the picture fills the screen, maintain the A/R, but cuts off approx 25% of the left and right of the picture

    I guess peoples' brains work in different ways; even when you point out the artistic shortcomings of "making it fit"
    you don't get anywhere.

    There was a website I saw once before that used the movie "Seven brides for seven brothers" to highlight the problem -
    this movie is a good example, it was shot in ultra wide screen (2.50:1) and has those famous dance sequences that take up the whole
    width
    My brain working in a different way does not get the "artistic" point. It would seem logical that any and all aspect ratios would then be considered a form of art on top of art (being the movie itself). My Tv,Samsung Plasma does 4:3, "fit to screen", 16:9, and "wide". Always thought I should be in 16:9 before reading in this and other forums that "fit to screen" does not stretch the image like 16:9. I don't want to miss anything, but again to me black bars are eye sores. I would think that with today's technology they could account for everything that one would want or miss.
    Well there's pan and scan, it was usually done to when converting widescreen to 4:3
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_and_scan

    By "artistic shortcomings" I just meant a presentation that deviates from what was intended by the film maker.
    But as you say, not everybody is bothered by this.

    In the past, supporters of the "full picture" and no black bars when shown the compromises that must be chosen
    in order to achieve it, either understood and accepted the compromise, or had a light bulb moment and had a rethink.

    At the end of the day. What compromise to the picture are you willing to accept to make it fill the whole screen?
    No compromise. I want both. So are you saying in the theater b/c it is wider, the whole picture fits the screen. Or am I missing out at the theater? I just thought since they are the same "shape" for lack of better knowledge that they could replicate the same picture on Blu-Ray. I guess I understand it, but couldn't the same be said about covering the director's "eye" from left to right, be said about up and down?
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  23. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    One always could go for a 2.35:1 TV such as the Philips https://www.trustedreviews.com/reviews/philips-cinema-21-9-56pfl9954h-56in-lcd-tv Of course then you would have black bars either side when viewing 16:9 or 4:3 material... Catch22 Geometry rules!
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post

    No offense, but I spent 7 months on Oahu and all they do there is swim in the water and barbecue. Almost 3rd world state to me. Doesn't surprise me that they would not have new stuff. I saw " The Gentlemen" last in the Imax on South Beach. Don't recall curtains or black bars. I remember seeing the whole screen and the whole movie covering the thing as intended imo. So on that note if they can do it in the theater then they should be able to do it on all releases without losing info.
    Hey, you're in Hawaii, why would you want to stay indoors?

    Actually, even before the Stay at Home order, I rarely, as in a decade go to the beach or park.

    And we have IMAX and ScreenX, 4DX, & RPX, whatever those are here too!

    I haven't been to any theater longer than I haven't been to the beach. I prefer watching my movies in a properly darkened room, in their original aspect ratio, sitting five feet away from my plasma, appreciating the artistic vision of the director.
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by netmask56 View Post
    Someone needs to do some research into the "black bars" phenomena - some people hate them and fortunately most don't notice and understand basic geometry. There's a PhD I'm sure
    Surely technology can defy basic geometry. " Most don't notice". Maybe more likely they are into the "artistic" nonsense, than can't tell.
    Or they watch in a properly darkened room, which means near pitch black so you don't know here the bezel of the the set is. It may seem silly to you, but I have blackout curtains and use black sheets on my sofa bed to reduce reflections when I watch movies. On my second smaller set, I've bumped into the bezel when walking pass because I couldn't see it.

    Maybe in the next, next, next generation of TVs, the screen will automatically resize itself to fit the aspect ratio of the movie. But then people like you will gripe that they're not getting full use of the screen when a 2.35:1 movie runs. *SIGH*
    Last edited by lingyi; 29th May 2020 at 19:23.
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    I've got the solution! We should do away with movies altogether and only have live action entertainment!

    Awww...but then those sitting in the front row will complain they can't see everything and the people at the top of the balcony will complain that they can't see everything clearly.

    Hmmm...back to the drawing board.
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  27. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post

    No offense, but I spent 7 months on Oahu and all they do there is swim in the water and barbecue. Almost 3rd world state to me. Doesn't surprise me that they would not have new stuff. I saw " The Gentlemen" last in the Imax on South Beach. Don't recall curtains or black bars. I remember seeing the whole screen and the whole movie covering the thing as intended imo. So on that note if they can do it in the theater then they should be able to do it on all releases without losing info.
    Hey, you're in Hawaii, why would you want to stay indoors?

    Actually, even before the Stay at Home order, I rarely, as in a decade go to the beach or park.

    And we have IMAX and ScreenX, 4DX, & RPX, whatever those are here too!

    I haven't been to any theater longer than I haven't been to the beach. I prefer watching my movies in a properly darkened room, in their original aspect ratio, sitting five feet away from my plasma, appreciating the artistic vision of the director.
    I was in HI in 2010. The beach to me is where you go on vacation. I prefer to look at the woods and nice houses. The ocean is too volatile to me.
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  28. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by netmask56 View Post
    Someone needs to do some research into the "black bars" phenomena - some people hate them and fortunately most don't notice and understand basic geometry. There's a PhD I'm sure
    Surely technology can defy basic geometry. " Most don't notice". Maybe more likely they are into the "artistic" nonsense, than can't tell.
    Or they watch in a properly darkened room, which means near pitch black so you don't know here the bezel of the the set is. It may seem silly to you, but I have blackout curtains and use black sheets on my sofa bed to reduce reflections when I watch movies. On my second smaller set, I've bumped into the bezel when walking pass because I couldn't see it.

    Maybe in the next, next, next generation of TVs, the screen will automatically resize itself to fit the aspect ratio of the movie. But then people like you will gripe that they're not getting full use of the screen when a 2.35:1 movie runs. *SIGH*
    I have night vision. Sure I watch my tv in a dark as possible room sometimes, but that doesn't take effect. Regardless of whether the bars are black or invisible it does not take away the fact that the image is less full than when I watch the news.
    Last edited by forsure; 29th May 2020 at 19:34.
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  29. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    I've got the solution! We should do away with movies altogether and only have live action entertainment!

    Awww...but then those sitting in the front row will complain they can't see everything and the people at the top of the balcony will complain that they can't see everything clearly.

    Hmmm...back to the drawing board.
    You mean like hologram technology. Total Recall stuff. No thanks.
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  30. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Originally Posted by netmask56 View Post
    Someone needs to do some research into the "black bars" phenomena - some people hate them and fortunately most don't notice and understand basic geometry. There's a PhD I'm sure
    Surely technology can defy basic geometry. " Most don't notice". Maybe more likely they are into the "artistic" nonsense, than can't tell.
    Or they watch in a properly darkened room, which means near pitch black so you don't know here the bezel of the the set is. It may seem silly to you, but I have blackout curtains and use black sheets on my sofa bed to reduce reflections when I watch movies. On my second smaller set, I've bumped into the bezel when walking pass because I couldn't see it.

    Maybe in the next, next, next generation of TVs, the screen will automatically resize itself to fit the aspect ratio of the movie. But then people like you will gripe that they're not getting full use of the screen when a 2.35:1 movie runs. *SIGH*
    I have night vision. Sure I watch my tv in a dark as possible room sometimes, but that doesn't take effect. Regardless of whether the bars are black or invisible it does take away the fact that the image is less full than when I watch the news.

    But then people like you will gripe that they're not getting full use of the screen when a 2.35:1 movie runs. *SIGH*
    Why would I gripe if by what you said it would fit the screen? Your ex. seems contradicting. Don't get all personal, I was just trying to figure out why it shows as full in the theatre and not at home.
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