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  1. There must be a lot like me for Philips to reinvent the TV, or as to the article "Because it really is one of those things that once tried is hard to live without".
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post

    Why would I gripe if by what you said it would fit the screen? Your ex. seems contradicting. Don't get all personal, I was just trying to figure out why it shows as full in the theatre and not at home.
    yes, the 2.35;1 movie will fit the screen, but what happens when you watch other movies that aren't as wide,
    such as 1.85:1 - quite common.

    Then you'll get black pillarbox bars to the side of the picture instead of letter box with the other TV !
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  3. Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post

    Why would I gripe if by what you said it would fit the screen? Your ex. seems contradicting. Don't get all personal, I was just trying to figure out why it shows as full in the theatre and not at home.
    yes, the 2.35;1 movie will fit the screen, but what happens when you watch other movies that aren't as wide,
    such as 1.85:1 - quite common.

    Then you'll get black pillarbox bars to the side of the picture instead of letter box with the other TV !
    I can read. However, that's not what your ex. said. "the screen will automatically resize itself to fit the aspect ratio of the movie." Wouldn't your leap in technology apply to anything you watch.
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    We already told you, you just don't like the answer.

    As has already been explained, you cannot get around physics.
    Either:
    1. Live with it, and watch at the proper aspect ratio along with black bars when the image doesn't match the screen's AR.
    2. Stretch it to fit the screen, making things disproportionately skinny or fat, depending.
    3. Zoom & Crop, and miss certain sections of the image.
    4. Get curtains/covers and make your own adjustment to hide the black bars when doing #1.

    That's it.


    Scott
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  5. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    We already told you, you just don't like the answer.

    As has already been explained, you cannot get around physics.
    Either:
    1. Live with it, and watch at the proper aspect ratio along with black bars when the image doesn't match the screen's AR.
    2. Stretch it to fit the screen, making things disproportionately skinny or fat, depending.
    3. Zoom & Crop, and miss certain sections of the image.
    4. Get curtains/covers and make your own adjustment to hide the black bars when doing #1.

    That's it.


    Scott
    Not even talking about that anymore. Talking about his tv that adjusts to the aspect ratio. It seems to me that the theater gets around physics. I have never in my entire life been to a theater where the screen has black bars or a curtain covers some of the screen.
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  6. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    We already told you, you just don't like the answer.

    As has already been explained, you cannot get around physics.
    Either:
    1. Live with it, and watch at the proper aspect ratio along with black bars when the image doesn't match the screen's AR.
    2. Stretch it to fit the screen, making things disproportionately skinny or fat, depending.
    3. Zoom & Crop, and miss certain sections of the image.
    4. Get curtains/covers and make your own adjustment to hide the black bars when doing #1.

    That's it.


    Scott


    Not even talking about that anymore. Talking about his tv that adjusts to the aspect ratio. It seems to me that the theater gets around physics. I have never in my entire life been to a theater where the screen has black bars or a curtain covers some of the screen.
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  7. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    I have never in my entire life been to a theater where the screen has black bars or a curtain covers some of the screen.
    Every theater I've been to has curtains that cover unused parts of the screen. If you didn't notice them it's because they were adjusted before the movie started.
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  8. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    We already told you, you just don't like the answer.

    As has already been explained, you cannot get around physics.
    Either:
    1. Live with it, and watch at the proper aspect ratio along with black bars when the image doesn't match the screen's AR.
    2. Stretch it to fit the screen, making things disproportionately skinny or fat, depending.
    3. Zoom & Crop, and miss certain sections of the image.
    4. Get curtains/covers and make your own adjustment to hide the black bars when doing #1.

    That's it.


    Scott
    You forgot option 5. Get Uverse and let them do whatever, cause I won't notice it then.
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  9. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    My brain working in a different way does not get the "artistic" point.
    The director chose the aspect ratio he wanted. He framed his scenes to take full advantage of that aspect ratio. If he had wanted a 1.78:1 ratio (sometimes called 16:9), he would have made the film that way. He made it for the movie theater, not home video. By chopping off the sides of the film you're saying (or the channels that do it are saying) you're a better director than the one who directed the film; you're a better cinematographer than the one who filmed the scenes for the director. That's a little exaggerated, but not much.

    You're posting nonsense in a "Videohelp" forum where the people actually care about such things. You can do whatever you like, but don't try and convince anyone here it's the proper way to go. Read them or not. Here's the video with the 7 Brides sequence that davexnet mentioned. It begins at 3:12 but the whole thing is good, I think:

    https://youtu.be/5m1-pP1-5K8

    And, apparently, some movie theaters are no longer using curtains to mask off the unused parts of the screen:

    http://www.jonathanlack.com/2015/05/with-cinemark-theaters-no-longer.html
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  10. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    My brain working in a different way does not get the "artistic" point.
    The director chose the aspect ratio he wanted. He framed his scenes to take full advantage of that aspect ratio. If he had wanted a 1.78:1 ratio (sometimes called 16:9), he would have made the film that way. He made it for the movie theater, not home video. By chopping off the sides of the film you're saying (or the channels that do it are saying) you're a better director than the one who directed the film; you're a better cinematographer than the one who filmed the scenes for the director. That's a little exaggerated, but not much.

    You're posting nonsense in a "Videohelp" forum where the people actually care about such things. You can do whatever you like, but don't try and convince anyone here it's the proper way to go. Read them or not. Here's the video with the 7 Brides sequence that davexnet mentioned. It begins at 3:12 but the whole thing is good, I think:

    https://youtu.be/5m1-pP1-5K8

    And, apparently, some movie theaters are no longer using curtains to mask off the unused parts of the screen:

    How am I posting nonsense, if by so many posts it's been said so many times before. It's an opinion you know like an *******. Don't comment if you just care to insult. Obviously I care or I wouldn't have posted to begin with or are you referring to the off topics. Who cares, move on.

    http://www.jonathanlack.com/2015/05/with-cinemark-theaters-no-longer.html
    How am I posting nonsense, if by so many posts it's been said so many times before. It's an opinion you know like an *******. Don't comment if you just care to insult. Obviously I care or I wouldn't have posted to begin with or are you referring to the off topics. Who cares, move on.
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  11. "The director chose the aspect ratio he wanted. He framed his scenes to take full advantage of that aspect ratio. If he had wanted a 1.78:1 ratio (sometimes called 16:9), he would have made the film that way. He made it for the movie theater, not home video. By chopping off the sides of the film you're saying (or the channels that do it are saying) you're a better director than the one who directed the film; you're a better cinematographer than the one who filmed the scenes for the director. That's a little exaggerated, but not much."

    That to me sounds like a bunch of b/s. The black bars are annoying. Directors like to be difficult. Film it the way it fits a theater so curtains don't have to cover it or film it the way tvs are sold. Film all movies in 16:9 . No one would notice. But yes lots of people with their nonsense notice half the screen gone. Except the ones that are as eccentric as some to go to ridiculous extremes to black out a room.
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  12. https://www.audioadvice.com/videos-reviews/widescreen-explained/

    According to the article, the director's view is a little bit wider. So what? I would rather sacrifice a little bit wider view and wait till the camera turns, than half my screen gone. It's marketing like everything else. It's far from enjoyable.
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  13. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    So, sounds like you really don't want HELP, nor answers, you just want to gripe & troll. Ok.
    Bye.

    Scott
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    Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    There must be a lot like me for Philips to reinvent the TV, or as to the article "Because it really is one of those things that once tried is hard to live without".
    Nothing new...

    2009 - https://www.cnet.com/pictures/photos-philips-cinema-219-ultra-widescreen-tv/

    2012 - https://www.theverge.com/2012/8/28/3273716/philips-cinema-21-9-tvs-discontinued

    2013 - https://www.engadget.com/2013-12-18-lg-105-inch-curved-uhd-tv-105ub9.html

    2019 - https://www.pcworld.idg.com.au/article/666132/ifa-2019-hisense-new-5k-tv-has-21-9-aspect-ratio/
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  15. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    A discussion about "1917" https://www.rogerdeakins.com/film-talk/1917-inspiration-and-aspect-ratio/ The "cinematic" aspect ratio of 2.39:1 is tried and true. It's expansive, immersive, and perfect for locations (such as battlefields) where horizontal lines dominate the composition.
    BeyonWiz T3 PVR ~ Popcorn A-500 ~ Samsung ES8000 65" LED TV ~ Windows 7 64bit ~ Yamaha RX-A1070 ~ QnapTS851-4G
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  16. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    delete and farewell
    BeyonWiz T3 PVR ~ Popcorn A-500 ~ Samsung ES8000 65" LED TV ~ Windows 7 64bit ~ Yamaha RX-A1070 ~ QnapTS851-4G
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    Last one before I go.

    It will be interesting where aspect ratios [go] in light of this current and unfortunately future situations.

    Before TV, 4:3 was the standard cinematic aspect ratio. Then when TV arrived and became widespread, movies went to 1.85:1 to draw audiences back to the theater. Then 2.1:1, 2.35:1 and 2.39:1 were adopted to keep them coming and enjoy the grandeur of going to the cinema, with premium priced RoadShow epics in the 50's and 60's being shown in lavish high end Cinerama and other immersive super widescreen theaters having limited runs.

    In the '80's and beyond, multiplex theater and screen sizes (moving away from wide and super widescreens) began to proliferate. With the introduction of HDTV and now UHD, theater attendance has been falling and at least for now, greatly non-existent. Movies already "in the can" are being released exclusively on home video or streaming.

    So maybe, 16:9 will become THE standard in the near future. Hmmm...

    Aloha!
    Last edited by lingyi; 30th May 2020 at 01:45.
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  18. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    How come in some UHD 2160p the A/R fits my whole tv (ex. Knives Out ) and in most others the A/R is 235:100? Is there something I need to look for in order to view in full screen? While using MPC-HC in Output/ "enhanced video renderer" I can not change the A/R. I can only change the A/R while in "System Default". Also the color in "enhanced video" looks a little orange , and if I use "system default" it won't play the video for UHD or 2160p? Ok well I think that is 3 questions, so any help would be appreciated.
    This will probably get me into trouble with the "purists", but you can easily use MPC-HC to zoom in until the picture fills the screen. You will of course, lose some picture each side, but you'll probably never miss it. The 9 key on the numeric keypad zooms in, 6 zooms out, and 5 resets it. Or of you're so inclined you can use Alt+6 and watch the movie in a mirror.

    Widescreen movies are panned and scanned for TV transmission all the time. Back in the CRT days they were often panned and scanned to 4:3. These days, if most widescreen movies aren't framed so they can be displayed on a 16:9 screen without losing important information, I'd be surprised.

    I had a look at the YouTube video manono linked to, which was really about cropping to 4:3 rather than 16:9, but I tried the example he mentioned and for sure, even on a 16:9 screen you probably wouldn't want to zoom in too much, although when I asked IMDB about it, I discovered it's listed as having three different aspect ratios. A little more research revealed it was actually filmed in two different aspect ratios, and the 1.78 version is included on the DVD, so there is a version without black bars.

    Anyway, there's the "9" key on the numeric keypad, and if you feel like you're losing too much picture, don't over-use it.

    Personally I think 2:1 is the ideal aspect ratio. It's used a lot for TV shows on streaming services such as Netflix, and the BBC seem to use it a fair bit these days. It's wide enough to look fairly cinematic, without the black bars being too noticeable.
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  19. Originally Posted by forsure View Post
    Not even talking about that anymore. Talking about his tv that adjusts to the aspect ratio. It seems to me that the theater gets around physics. I have never in my entire life been to a theater where the screen has black bars or a curtain covers some of the screen.
    You definitely have, but haven't noticed, which is the reason for the curtains. On quite a few occasions I've seen previews/adverts/shorts with a different aspect ratio to the main movie, and the curtains were opened further just before the movie started to widen the screen and accommodate the widescreen picture.
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