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  1. Okay, as I suspected, phase (or field) shifted. In case Joey Bagodonuts doesn't understand what that means:

    In progressive video the upper and lower fields (here shown by capital and lower case letters) are lined up like so:

    Code:
    A B C D E F G
    a b c d e f g
    When phase-shifted each field is in a pair with an adjoining field:

    Code:
    A B C D E F G
    b c d e f g h
    Where in the upper set of frames the fields are from the same point in time, in the lower set the frames are comprised of fields taken from 2 different points in time. Therefore, they appear to be interlaced but are really from a progressive source (a movie). That progressive content can be easily restored with a simple TFM (a field matcher) from the TIVTC filter. Doing so recreates the progressive frames without the damage a deinterlacer - any deinterlacer - does.

    To my mind, the interpolation is a complete waste of time. A restoration aims to do just that - restore the film to the way it appeared when first shown in a movie theater nearly 90 years ago. Among other things, that means 24fps. An experiment, maybe; a restoration, no.
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  2. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    A restoration aims to do just that - restore the film to the way it appeared when first shown in a movie theater nearly 90 years ago. Among other things, that means 24fps. An experiment, maybe; a restoration, no.
    Agreed. And thank you for the explanation of phase shifting.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by Joey Bagodonuts View Post
    Originally Posted by manono View Post
    A restoration aims to do just that - restore the film to the way it appeared when first shown in a movie theater nearly 90 years ago. Among other things, that means 24fps. An experiment, maybe; a restoration, no.
    Agreed. And thank you for the explanation of phase shifting.
    I downloaded the movie from Youtube and watched the first five minutes on my LG TV.
    It certainly looks similar as 24/30 fps material does when LG's "Tru Motion" (interpolation) setting is active -
    the soap opera effect. (The LG also has another setting Real Cinema", supposed to double the frame rate of 24 fps sources,
    LG claims it's like being at the movies. It's very questionable and from I've read in enthusiasts forums,
    most people turn them both off)

    Watching it makes me dizzy after a short while. So maintaining the original framerate would be my choice for a real restoration.

    As an experiment though, it looks spectacular. Do you plan to do any more?
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  4. Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    As an experiment though, it looks spectacular. Do you plan to do any more?
    Thank you for the compliment!
    As for my next adventure....ahh....I never knows until the urge hits!
    But I will keep these suggestions and comments in the vault.
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  5. I too saw the phase shifting. This script fixes it:

    Code:
    #This script fixes phase shifted progressive content
    
    AVISource("E:\fs.avi") #Change this to point to the d2v clip -- I use a frameserver into my AVS scripts so I always get the same results, regardless of video format
    
    source=AssumeTFF()
    
    even= source.trim(1,0).separatefields().selecteven
    odd = source.separatefields().selectodd
    interleave(odd,even)
    fixed=weave()
    
    #return fixed.separatefields()
    #stackvertical(source,fixed)
    
    return fixed
    Last edited by johnmeyer; 27th May 2020 at 16:28. Reason: add comment to script
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