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  1. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    India
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    Hi, can i extract the embedded subtitle from a downloaded video using any free application
    or is it not possible at all

    Also when i download a video and play with vlc media player, does vlc media player play the video with its default video player settings or
    it is playing with the original video and audio format of the original video from the site.
    why i am asking , is even i find old video shows date back to years, if i check the codec in vlc, gives mp4 avc10 etc with m4a audio
    or in other way,
    shoud i select windows media player as a default player , so that it willl be downloaded with older video and audio format which is supporrted by even older tv to play
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  2. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    Sep 2005
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    Sydney, Australia
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    "Hi, can i extract the embedded subtitle from a downloaded video using any free application
    or is it not possible at all"

    It depends on what you mean by embedded

    If it is burnt in then it's part of the video image and cannot be extracted
    If you mean it's like a MKV file that has the subtitle within in it that you can turn on or off then yes you can extract it.

    In VLC can you turn the subtitle off - Menu SUBTITLE -> Disable if you can then you can extract the subtitle file

    What is the suffix of the file ie mkv or mp4 etc...
    BeyonWiz T3 PVR ~ Popcorn A-500 ~ Samsung ES8000 65" LED TV ~ Windows 7 64bit ~ Yamaha RX-A1070 ~ QnapTS851-4G
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  3. Member
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    Mar 2013
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    India
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    Hi, the downloaded file is ofcourse, has mkv extension.
    But , if i play that in vlc, i do not get disable menu at all.
    i only get add subtitles and below it
    Subtrack in hidde nform
    The video codec is h264 avc1 and audio codec is Opus audio
    expect reply from met----
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  4. Member
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    Jul 2007
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    United States
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    Open the file in MKVExtractGui which is a part of MKVToolnix. If there's a separate sub track, it will show it and you can extract it. If there's no separate track, it's hardcoded.
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  5. Member
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    Jul 2007
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    United States
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    Originally Posted by jraju View Post
    Hi, can i extract the embedded subtitle from a downloaded video using any free application
    or is it not possible at all

    Also when i download a video and play with vlc media player, does vlc media player play the video with its default video player settings or
    it is playing with the original video and audio format of the original video from the site.
    why i am asking , is even i find old video shows date back to years, if i check the codec in vlc, gives mp4 avc10 etc with m4a audio
    or in other way,
    shoud i select windows media player as a default player , so that it willl be downloaded with older video and audio format which is supporrted by even older tv to play
    Use Mediainfo to check the properties of the old videos. VLC is probably misreporting the info.

    Your choice of media player has no bearing on whether the video will play on your TV or not, everything is done by the player. VLC has much better support for playing different types of files, especially if you're talking the Windows Media Player included with Windows.
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  6. Member
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    Mar 2013
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    India
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    HI, thanks for the replies.
    i think it is hard coded.

    Hi, lingyi,
    thanks for the information.
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  7. there could be eia format closed captions in a ts format file without a separate track. closed captions displayed by vlc have a distinct look that should be easily distinguishable from hard-coded subtitles.
    Last edited by blimey; 16th May 2020 at 15:02.
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  8. You can usually tell the difference between hard coded and embedded subtitles by their visual appearance: while there are exceptions, hard coded subs tend to look more smooth and "professional", less clunky, and rarely display the nasty bits of extraneous code or symbols that pop up intermittently even on excellent embedded subs. Hard coded subs are almost never "hearing impaired" with sound descriptions and names attached.

    As others have suggested, examine the file with an up-to-date media tool, this should decisively tell you whether there is a separate embedded sub track that you can extract. The most common mkv subs are in .ass or .srt format, easily extracted with utilities like MKVToolnix. Some mkvs that were made from commercial sources employ more arcane subtitle tracks: they can be extracted but may not be easily converted to the .srt format preferred by many TVs and lower-end media players. If the video was ever popular at all, there's probably a matching .srt sub file available on one of the subtitle archive sites (SubScene, addic7ed, etc).
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  9. You can open the video in VirtualDub2 and scroll around. If you see subs, they're hardcoded and can't be extracted. Not easily, anyway.
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