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  1. I was wondering if it would be possible to create a DVD with both regular MPEG-2 video and HD AVCHD video files? And do this in such a way the disc could play in both a normal DVD player, and you could also play the HD video files in a bluray player or computer. I donít own a bluray player but I thought it was an interesting idea. Maybe it could be done with a dual-layer DVD where one layer was the SD film, and the other the HD version. Or maybe this is already possible and I donít know about it? If you know of anything like this I would be interested to hear about it.
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  2. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Not possible.


    You would require to write to two sets of folders. Now a dvd player would only see the Video_ts folder but the blu-ray player would see both and might baulk at which one to play.


    And you can not influence a writer as to where you put the files on a disk. All would have to be written at the same time and even that could immediately fail.
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  3. Commercially, there's double sided discs - one side dvd, the other side bluray.
    Never heard of a consumer recordable discs of that type, but if anyone made it, you'd burn dvd to one side, bluray to the other.

    For a dvd, you'd master it normally - video_ts and audio_ts folders. Any dvd player would see those and play.

    Now, for the avchd, I'll assume you mean mp4 of any sort 1080 resolution. You'd master bluray folders normally as well.

    Combine the dvd and bluray folders, burn to a dvd.

    You'd have the Video_ts, audio_ts, stream (bluray) etc folders.
    Then, test.

    ....

    Extra folders won't mess up a dvd player in general because it only looks at the two - video_ts and audio_ts.

    If the bluray gets confused, you'd want to test mp4 file playback ability. Create a folder hdvideo, drop in 1080 mp4 files, combine with dvd folders, burn to dvd.

    On the bluray, you'd have to manually open the hdvideo folder mp4 files and play those. This will likely work on bluray players that have some sort of media drive playback capability.

    Otherwise, you'd have to consider upgrading to a bluray player (tons on craigslist under $40, or playstation 3, 4, xbox console), a media stick (e.g. Intel PC stick computer) where you can easily play mp4 off a microsd card/hd/network drive, intel nuc mini pc., etc.
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  4. Thanks for the replies, I understand better now. I do have another question though, with some CDs I've bought they have been enhanced so they held digital extras in a separate data section of the disc. On my computer, the audio CD and data parts appeared as different drives. Again I'm talking hypotheticaly out of interest, but might there be a way to 'partition' a DVD when put in a computer drive to show up as two separate discs. One a bluray/avchd and one a DVD? Therefore you could use the DVD normally in DVD players, but be able to select the BluRay disc when put on a computer drive?
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  5. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by babygdav View Post
    Commercially, there's double sided discs - one side dvd, the other side bluray.
    Never heard of a consumer recordable discs of that type, but if anyone made it, you'd burn dvd to one side, bluray to the other.

    For a dvd, you'd master it normally - video_ts and audio_ts folders. Any dvd player would see those and play.

    Now, for the avchd, I'll assume you mean mp4 of any sort 1080 resolution. You'd master bluray folders normally as well.

    Combine the dvd and bluray folders, burn to a dvd.

    You'd have the Video_ts, audio_ts, stream (bluray) etc folders.
    Then, test.

    ....

    Extra folders won't mess up a dvd player in general because it only looks at the two - video_ts and audio_ts.

    If the bluray gets confused, you'd want to test mp4 file playback ability. Create a folder hdvideo, drop in 1080 mp4 files, combine with dvd folders, burn to dvd.

    On the bluray, you'd have to manually open the hdvideo folder mp4 files and play those. This will likely work on bluray players that have some sort of media drive playback capability.

    Otherwise, you'd have to consider upgrading to a bluray player (tons on craigslist under $40, or playstation 3, 4, xbox console), a media stick (e.g. Intel PC stick computer) where you can easily play mp4 off a microsd card/hd/network drive, intel nuc mini pc., etc.






    are you really as stupid as your advice sounds? avchd is a dvd based format. bluray hadn't even been introduced yet.
    Media[edit]

    AVCHD specification allows using recordable DVDs, memory cards, non-removable solid-state memory and hard disk drives as recording media.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  6. Yes, there is the avchd dvd disc format where you can create hd video discs that play in compatible dvd/bluray/ps3. But avchd files can be created by camcorders and cameras, too, to sd card and such. (My wx350 does that for videos.)

    A avchd dvd is not playable on a regular dvd player. It can play on dvd players that have such support. PS3 can.

    Here again, you'd have to see if there's a way to render both the dvd (video_ts etc) and avchd (bdmv) file structures and files on your pc, combine, then burn all to a dvd.

    Then test if it's compatible with a regular dvd and bluray players.

    ....

    The poster's goal of keeping both a dvd format video stream and hd video stream on a single dvd that can play on a regular dvd and bluray player is not commonly asked for, nor is there any "standard" for this.

    He would have to try combining the dvd video structure with hd mp4 files or a bluray/avchd file structure and see if it even works.

    Not an easy question to answer, and I certainly haven't come across anyone doing this.
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  7. Originally Posted by VideoHelp2004 View Post
    Thanks for the replies, I understand better now. I do have another question though, with some CDs I've bought they have been enhanced so they held digital extras in a separate data section of the disc. On my computer, the audio CD and data parts appeared as different drives. Again I'm talking hypotheticaly out of interest, but might there be a way to 'partition' a DVD when put in a computer drive to show up as two separate discs. One a bluray/avchd and one a DVD? Therefore you could use the DVD normally in DVD players, but be able to select the BluRay disc when put on a computer drive?
    For the br + dvd idea, you'd try combining br and dvd video disc render folders, burn to a dvd, try it out. The dvd player will only see the video_ts folder and play the dvd contents. The computer software like mphc, vlc can play anything anywhere, so just point it to the br folder.

    ....

    If you want br+dvd+cd, then the only effective way that will likely work on computers is to do the above + rip the cd to an iso file. On a computer, mount that iso file from the dvd, then it ought to appear as if you stuck that cd into the cd player in the pc and work the same.

    .....

    Long term, everyone wanting to maintain the "original" rips cd, dvd, bluray to iso files. Playing such on pc = identical to original.
    Anydvd can do the latter two. Maybe cd as well, but nero, etc cd burning programs can do the cd rip to iso.

    Storing the iso means it can't be played on a dvd or bluray or cd drive, can be burned to a disc to play on such, else, can be played easily on any pc like the original disc.
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  8. But what is the eventual goal?
    You have a pc, likely a dvd and tv, some device that captures avchd video. But long term, what do you want to do with those and the cds?
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  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Authoring & combining & burning is not really an issue with the right tools.

    Playing will be where there are issues.

    For BD + DVD (on dvd media, of course), the DVD player should play the DVD portion fine if the player is more recent than ~2002/3.
    Old, OLD players relied on absolute sector placement, and even sometimes ISO9660 system instead of the UDF 1.02 that was recommended (the spec for DVD-Video is a bridge spec, remember).
    Newer players would use UDF and use the logical placement to find the files.

    For that same title in BD players, it depends on the firmware of the player.
    Some will look first to the media type, and will see dvd media, so will only play the dvd portion.
    Others might look for the logical type first and, preferring BD (since it is a BD player), it should look find and play automatically the BD (or in this case AVCHD) portion.
    Then there are other plsyers that might need to have it all spelled for them and if all is not in order avoiding additional entanglements, they will baulk and not play ANYTHING from that disc.
    Lastly, and most likely, most rarely, would be players that are smart enough to ask you which one to play.

    I wouldn't mix AudioCDs into this already confusing arena, as their user sector format is NOT the same as cdrom/dvd/bd. AudioCD uses 2352 sectors/byte while CDROM(mode1/mode2form1)/DVD/BD uses 2048 sectors/byte.
    That means the only way to have a properly-read* enhanced, dualmode cd is using multisession recording - always with the audio on session 1 and the data on session 2.

    The problem of that with dvd & bd is that many settop players will only see session 1 contents!

    Scott

    *there are other types of dual mode cds, but they are not properly read by modern hardware (both consumer elec. and PCs), and playing such discs could possibly damage your speakers with full signal digital noise!

    Btw, this isn't hypothetical: I have made such test discs before of just about all of these types.
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 24th Apr 2020 at 21:19.
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  10. Member DB83's Avatar
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    It strikes me that our 'Google artist' did not read nor wish to read what the OP required.


    He required (do correct me if I am wrong) a standard AVCHD disk (with all the relevant folders) on a standard dvd disk. Not some quasi-format that players might read be-them dvd or blu-ray.


    Just blurs/confuses the issue.
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    You are wrong. A "standard avchd on dvd media" is one of the options of STANDARD avchd. The OP specifically mentioned BOTH "mpeg2 (dvd) and avchd" on the same disc, to be played separately by different players. Which is what we've been talking about. Also, look at the subject title.

    Not sure who you mean by Google artist, though.
    ??

    Scott
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  12. Member DB83's Avatar
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    @Scott


    Do refer to my original reply. I do believe I understood what the OP required.


    'Google artist' is my sarcastic take on what typically involves the responses (in other threads) of a third respondent to this topic - a scattering of web search links which anyone (even the OP) could already have done and not wish to read. People come here for real knowledge.
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  13. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Ohh, ok I get it about the google artist thing now.

    But, as I stated, to write such a disc IS quite doable, as I have done many similar such discs.
    It certainly isn't practical, though (due to playback issues that we both mentioned). That's for sure.

    Scott
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  14. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    To the OP, If I were in your shoes I would rather buy a used Blu-ray player for $15 and forget about the DVD, Heck any optical media is almost obsolete now, Use memory card, cloud storage or one of the video platforms available with little quality sacrifice, But for the sake of argument lets say you authored a DVD-Video to hard drive and a AVCHD to hard drive, put both disk structure folders on the root of DVD-R using IMGBRN, You'd still have to have a blu-ray player to see if it works, So either way you need a blu-ray player to test your theory.



    Originally Posted by DB83 View Post
    'Google artist' is my sarcastic take on what typically involves the responses (in other threads) of a third respondent to this topic - a scattering of web search links which anyone (even the OP) could already have done and not wish to read. People come here for real knowledge.
    Yeah, an abundance of useless linked youtube videos, boring white paper links and overpriced hardware and software suggestions, 90% of threads here could have been avoided if the posters did some reading on their own anyway so I don't see what's the purpose of linking materials that are easily retrievable by simple key strikes. I guess this is the new norm we're living in now where experience is obtained from google. Where are the good old days where you could get help from real video professionals and enthusiasts? Videohelp use to be a good place to get video help.
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  15. https://panasonic.net/cns/archiver/optical_technology/#Benefits

    Optical media isn't obsolete by far.

    https://panasonic.net/cns/archiver/concept/index.html

    There's simply no other viable media format besides tapes for long term archival storage.

    Only tape and optical discs have been around enough decades to prove in real usage that they last decades.

    ....

    Hard drives - no vendor is warranting more than 5 years. 5-10 years is about it.

    SSD.
    https://cdn.selinc.com/assets/Literature/Publications/White%20Papers/0015_NANDflash_IO...0170218-001047

    Let's not kid ourselves.
    Electron migration hasn't been eliminated.
    Even storing them in a hot room increases data loss quickly.

    ....
    https://panasonic.net/cns/blu-ray_disc/biz_ideal_media.html

    Inorganic bluray discs from a top maker like Panasonic are they way to go if not tape.

    (Dvd use an organic layer, degrades easily, no good.)

    Rare M-disc dvds are the only workable alternative for dvds.

    ....

    Cool storage, away from light, in a box.
    I have tons of CD-Rs from the 95/98/XP era in cold storage that read fine today. That's a good 20+ years.

    No reason good bluray discs won't last that long, especially given the development based on bluray tech Sony and Panasonic have done for archival storage.
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  16. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Here we go again.
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