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  1. Hi,

    My question is basicly if you should put dialogue normalisation back after it was removed during a conversion.

    I'm adding an audio track from a Blu-Ray to another version of the same movie that has superior video. The audio is a .thd file. Usually when I need to resync one of those, I run it through eac3to to convert them to wavs using "eac3to infile.thd outfile.wavs", resync the .wav files, and convert those to DTS-HD MA, as I have no way of encoding to TrueHD. This is, by itself, usually no problem, but this time when I ran the .thd file through eac3to, it says it removed dialogue normalisation. Now I know that's usually a good thing and even the manual of DTS Encoder Suite advises against using attenuation, but the DTS Encoder Suite still has an option to set dialogue normalisation.

    Now my question is: Do I set the same value the Dialogue Normalisation had (-27dB in this case) before eac3to removed it back in DTS Encoder Suite, or do I just leave that at the standard setting of -31dB and leave attenuation disabled? I want the resulting DTS-HD MA file to sound as close to the original TrueHD track as possible.

    I'm actually very curious about how to properly handle this situation, as my current way of handling it is fearing discs that use dialogue normalisation. I'd like to be able to stop doing that.
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    DialNorm is a Dolby (AC3/EAC3/TrueHD) attribute. If DTS has a dialnorm setting, it isn't clear that it operates the same way that Dolby's does.

    Also, it is a playback adjustment. It isn't "permanently applied" during editing or conversion, or even "stripped", just not applied during the playback while editing. The conversion strips it because you are then using a different file format, with different attributes (even if they might be comparable).

    It is inherently concerned with making sure the dialog is at the consistent level throughout multiple programs, so is dependent upon your own program's dynamics. Did you change them during the conversion?

    Scott
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  3. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    DialNorm is a Dolby (AC3/EAC3/TrueHD) attribute. If DTS has a dialnorm setting, it isn't clear that it operates the same way that Dolby's does.
    I agree. In fact, I once put it back after it got removed on a EAC3 file, and it had a lot less bass when it was converted to DTS, even though DTS usually tends to have more bass than Dolby.

    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Also, it is a playback adjustment. It isn't "permanently applied" during editing or conversion, or even "stripped", just not applied during the playback while editing. The conversion strips it because you are then using a different file format, with different attributes (even if they might be comparable).
    I already suspected as much. Thx for confirming.

    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    It is inherently concerned with making sure the dialog is at the consistent level throughout multiple programs, so is dependent upon your own program's dynamics. Did you change them during the conversion?
    I didn't change anything to the audio itself. I only edit it for synchronising it to the target video by cutting in Audacity and exporting it to signed 24-bits PCMs, which are then converted to DTS-HD MA.

    I want the final audio file to sound identical to the source file, but I'm not sure how to achieve this. Is it better to let eac3to remove it, and put it back later? Is it better to not put it back? Or is it, like I suspect, best to not remove it and not use the option in DTS Encoder?
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