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  1. Hey guys!, this is my first time on this site... nice to meet you all!

    I have a 1.08 Gbyte mp4 file, it's resolution is 720p = 1280 x 720, i want to play it on a 32-inch full HD TV: 1080p (1920×1080 px) AND i want to get a good quality (i wanna obtain a real FULL HD quality)
    What should i do? A friend of mine told me that i should care about the image fidelity video in order to obtain good results.. and a converter is not enough

    Can you help me?Which programs are the best?What would you do?

    Thanks!


    EDIT:

    I've attached a file on this thread, it is a video file (mp4) and it's resolution is 720p. The quality is not good at all and i want to play it on a 32-inch full HD TV: 1080p (1920×1080 px). How can i improve the quality of this video and make it looks great in the TV? What are the tricks behind the scene? It does look horrible!

    What is the BEST that i can do in order to get the best results?What should i do?What is the maximum available quality?
    Shoud i convert it into another video format?


    Thanks!
    Image Attached Files
    Last edited by VideoLover; 25th Mar 2020 at 20:17.
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  2. You can't add quality that isn't there.

    If there are specific flaws, many of them can be covered up.

    If you want to post a small piece of your file, someone may be able to offer advice. Otherwise, play it as-is.
    (Have no idea what "image fidelity video" is supposed to mean.)

    And welcome to the forums.
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  3. Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You can't add quality that isn't there.
    all is said
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  4. Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You can't add quality that isn't there.

    If there are specific flaws, many of them can be covered up.

    If you want to post a small piece of your file, someone may be able to offer advice. Otherwise, play it as-is.
    (Have no idea what "image fidelity video" is supposed to mean.)

    And welcome to the forums.
    Thank you for replying!
    Sorry, can i ask you something? isn´t possible to convert a video from 720p to 1080p and get good results? What's the reason? You just cannot obtain a higher quality if the video was recorded in 720p?
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  5. Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    i want to play it on a 32-inch full HD TV: 1080p (1920×1080 px) AND i want to get a good quality (i wanna obtain a real FULL HD quality)
    The television will play it at 1080p and probably in better quality than you'll get by reencoding your 720p video.
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You can't add quality that isn't there.

    If there are specific flaws, many of them can be covered up.

    If you want to post a small piece of your file, someone may be able to offer advice. Otherwise, play it as-is.
    (Have no idea what "image fidelity video" is supposed to mean.)

    And welcome to the forums.
    Thank you for replying!
    Sorry, can i ask you something? isn´t possible to convert a video from 720p to 1080p and get good results? What's the reason? You just cannot obtain a higher quality if the video was recorded in 720p?
    2nd law of thermodynamics (idea of conservation of entropy) comes into play:
    You can never get better quality than your source without putting in your own Creative work.
    Or put in terms of gravity - water always flows downhill. For water to get higher than its source requires an external "pump" (which uses up its own energy).

    The detail of a 720p image will be the same or worse even in a 1080p resized result (barring creative work using AI or manual artistic/engineering re-depiction).
    However, it is possible to "rob peter to pay paul" and apply clever noise reduction or sharpness (local contrast) enhancement, to FOOL one's eye into thinking it looks "better", even though there is probably less detail - due to those processes. A lot depends on whose eye needs fooling.

    Your assumption that: this 720p file was already a downrezzed version from a higher rez image and that it would look better if natively captured at 720p is valid if true. But mainly because, it would be 1 generation re-encoded, and would have downrezzing artifacts ("guessing" the interpolative detail), while a native capture would not.

    Scott
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  7. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    i want to play it on a 32-inch full HD TV: 1080p (1920×1080 px) AND i want to get a good quality (i wanna obtain a real FULL HD quality)
    The television will play it at 1080p and probably in better quality than you'll get by reencoding your 720p video.
    Hey pal, how are you?
    What do you mean? Are you sure the TV will play it at 1080p? Why? It's resolution is 720p :/
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  8. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You can't add quality that isn't there.

    If there are specific flaws, many of them can be covered up.

    If you want to post a small piece of your file, someone may be able to offer advice. Otherwise, play it as-is.
    (Have no idea what "image fidelity video" is supposed to mean.)

    And welcome to the forums.
    Thank you for replying!
    Sorry, can i ask you something? isn´t possible to convert a video from 720p to 1080p and get good results? What's the reason? You just cannot obtain a higher quality if the video was recorded in 720p?
    2nd law of thermodynamics (idea of conservation of entropy) comes into play:
    You can never get better quality than your source without putting in your own Creative work.
    Or put in terms of gravity - water always flows downhill. For water to get higher than its source requires an external "pump" (which uses up its own energy).

    The detail of a 720p image will be the same or worse even in a 1080p resized result (barring creative work using AI or manual artistic/engineering re-depiction).
    However, it is possible to "rob peter to pay paul" and apply clever noise reduction or sharpness (local contrast) enhancement, to FOOL one's eye into thinking it looks "better", even though there is probably less detail - due to those processes. A lot depends on whose eye needs fooling.

    Your assumption that: this 720p file was already a downrezzed version from a higher rez image and that it would look better if natively captured at 720p is valid if true. But mainly because, it would be 1 generation re-encoded, and would have downrezzing artifacts ("guessing" the interpolative detail), while a native capture would not.

    Scott
    Thanks for the great explanation, you know a lot!
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Originally Posted by VideoLover View Post
    i want to play it on a 32-inch full HD TV: 1080p (1920×1080 px) AND i want to get a good quality (i wanna obtain a real FULL HD quality)
    The television will play it at 1080p and probably in better quality than you'll get by reencoding your 720p video.
    Hey pal, how are you?
    What do you mean? Are you sure the TV will play it at 1080p? Why? It's resolution is 720p :/
    Depends on the TV, but most recent TV's will upscale any video to fill the screen
    and keep the aspect ratio intact (according to TV settings)

    I resized an HD video to 480x268 and tried it on my 50 inch TV,
    it fills the screen, a little soft, but better than you might think
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  10. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Depends on your zoom/scale settings: zoom/stretch would fill the screen (as close as possible), 1:1/just fit/pixel-for-pixel would show it in window at its native rez. Every modern tv I've seen has these and more options.

    Scott
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  11. Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    You can't add quality that isn't there.

    If there are specific flaws, many of them can be covered up.

    If you want to post a small piece of your file, someone may be able to offer advice. Otherwise, play it as-is.
    (Have no idea what "image fidelity video" is supposed to mean.)

    And welcome to the forums.
    I have updated my thread and uploaded a video too
    Take a look
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  12. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Depends on your zoom/scale settings: zoom/stretch would fill the screen (as close as possible), 1:1/just fit/pixel-for-pixel would show it in window at its native rez. Every modern tv I've seen has these and more options.

    Scott
    I have updated my thread!
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  13. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Thoughts:
    1. Video is a probable re-encode (export from vlc), thus not original (optimal) quality.
    2. Video uses AVC Main@3.1, which is ok for 720, but could be better like High@4.1. Or even better using HEVC.
    3. Video bitrate is 1.6Mbps, which is not the most minimal, but could better. Bluray is up to 40Mbps, averaging 18-25/30Mbps (even for some 720p material). That means this is 1/15 the bitrate. Maybe that much isn't necessary for cgi/game animation, but probably is still 1/10th of what it could be. Bit starvation is the most common cause of artifacting in clips.
    4. Video is variable framerate. Some players may have issues with properly displaying on set refresh rate consumer TV. Should have been CFR for better compatibility.

    Scott
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  14. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Thoughts:
    1. Video is a probable re-encode (export from vlc), thus not original (optimal) quality.
    2. Video uses AVC Main@3.1, which is ok for 720, but could be better like High@4.1. Or even better using HEVC.
    3. Video bitrate is 1.6Mbps, which is not the most minimal, but could better. Bluray is up to 40Mbps, averaging 18-25/30Mbps (even for some 720p material). That means this is 1/15 the bitrate. Maybe that much isn't necessary for cgi/game animation, but probably is still 1/10th of what it could be. Bit starvation is the most common cause of artifacting in clips.
    4. Video is variable framerate. Some players may have issues with properly displaying on set refresh rate consumer TV. Should have been CFR for better compatibility.

    Scott
    Hey dude, thanks for helping me!
    What would you recommend me to do in order to solve points 3 and 4? I cannot do anything to solve point 1... i think Handbrake can help me to solve point 2 but no clue about the others
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