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  1. Member
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    Is the Seagate STEB4000200 Expansion Desktop 4TB a 5400 RPM HDD?

    https://www.seagate.com/support/external-hard-drives/desktop-hard-drives/expansion-desktop/

    I can't find this information in the specifications, but only the BarraCuda Pro 4TB seems to be 7200 RPM.

    https://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/hdd/barracuda/

    Does anyone know the exact model that is inside?
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  2. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    The older seagate expansion drives were 5400 rpm so i would say the 4 tb version are the same.,
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by kyrcy View Post
    Is the Seagate STEB4000200 Expansion Desktop 4TB a 5400 RPM HDD?

    https://www.seagate.com/support/external-hard-drives/desktop-hard-drives/expansion-desktop/

    I can't find this information in the specifications, but only the BarraCuda Pro 4TB seems to be 7200 RPM.

    https://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/hdd/barracuda/

    Does anyone know the exact model that is inside?
    according to this - https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Archive-STEB4000200-external-drive/dp/B00UNA1OBQ
    it has a 5400 RPM HDD.
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    Unless it's specified (usually only for third party externals), always assume any name brand, especially Seagate and WD external drive contains a 5400RPM drive and the actual drive inside is subject to change to another entry level drive at any time. Understandable since the single drive Seagate and WD externals are sold for much less than their identical counterparts.

    The good news is that current 5400RPM drives perform better than older drives because they usually have a 256 or 512MB buffer. I've posted about how I've gotten sustained 120-130MB/s transfer speeds on my 5400RPM 8TB Seagate Archive drive and 12TB WD NAS drive (decased from an external Easystore) from another drive in my multi-bay USB 3.0 enclosure.

    Edit: I've read accounts of people getting 7200RPM drives in their externals in the past, but it's very rare and short lived. Almost certainly due to overrun of 7200RPM drives or drives that didn't meet the full requirements to be sold as an internal 7200RPM drive.
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    I suppose if I really want 7200RPM I should buy an internal drive, even if it is more expensive. The least expensive 4TB options are SEAGATE ST4000VN008 IRONWOLF and TOSHIBA N300 HDWQ140EZSTA. Because of previous bad experience with Seagate, I do have a preference for Toshiba. What do you think?
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    Yes, the only way to be sure to get a 7200RPM drive, which are fewer since the introduction of SSDs, is to buy an internal marked as such.

    As for reliability, buy on price and warranty and keep at least one backup of everything on it. You personal (and others) bad experience with Seagate means nothing compared to the billions of Seagate drives drives in use.

    AFAIK, there are were only three truly bad hard drives with excessive failures and two of the companies that made them no longer make hard drives. The Quantum Bigfoot series in the mid 90ʻs, the IBM 75GXP and 60GXP Deskstar (nicknamed DeathStar) series in the early 2000ʻs and possibly the Seagate ST3000DM001 in 2011-2012.
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  7. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    i've been switching over to toshiba drives from samsung. all 7200rpm. only thing i notice different than the samsungs is that they run hotter. so far i'm happy with them.

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  8. I suppose if I really want 7200RPM I should buy an internal drive, even if it is more expensive. The least expensive 4TB options are SEAGATE ST4000VN008 IRONWOLF and TOSHIBA N300 HDWQ140EZSTA. Because of previous bad experience with Seagate, I do have a preference for Toshiba. What do you think?
    Problem with Toshiba is the customer service, at least in Europe and at least for 3.5" HDDs : unless their policy has changed in the past few years Toshiba Europe doesn't propose a direct RMA service for internal 3.5" HDDs, so one has to deal with the seller instead. I had an issue with a Toshiba 3.5" drive back in 2014, purchased from an online shop, and could get a replacement unit from another brand, but a few months later that online shop vanished, so if it had happened then I'd have been SOL / JWF (another lesson is that it might be preferrable to purchase that kind of equipment from well established shops rather than new ones which happen to have slightly cheaper prices for a particular model on a particular day).

    Otherwise, Seagate does have a bad reputation in recent years among data recovery specialists — although arguably they only see those which do fail so their experience may not be statistically significant ; still, from what I could gather these ranges of drives have design flaws which make certain types of failure more likely to happen, and when they do happen the consequences tend to be more severe than with other brands. But speaking from my own experiences : I've had issues with a ST2000DM001, I could recover 100% of it (only a small part of the filesystem area was corrupted) ; I've had issues with a ST3000DM001, I could recover almost everything except 6 video files (and I could recover a good portion of those files although it was tricky) ; and I've had issues with a Western Digital WD6400AAKS, but for this one it happened suddenly and it was most likely a head failure, so DIY recovery highly unlikely {*} (fortunately I had nothing valuable on this one). And my main drive for daily storage is a Seagate ST2000DX001, from the same dreaded range, purchased used about three years ago, which is still working flawlessly.

    On a side note, it's interesting to know that Toshiba began to produce 3.5" units at Western Digital's request, just so that the two giants of the sector (WD & Seagate) could be compliant with anti-trust laws. From Western Digital Wikipedia article : “In March 2012, Western Digital completed the acquisition of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies and became the largest traditional hard drive manufacturer in the world. To address the requirements of regulatory agencies, in May 2012 WDC divested assets to manufacture and sell 3.5-inch hard drives for the desktop and consumer electronics markets to Toshiba.”


    {*} I might still try to perform a head swap on this one, as I have another of the exact same model, and it would at least be a good learning experience, but the odds of success are low without a industrial-level clean environment and the required experience.
    Last edited by abolibibelot; 31st Jan 2020 at 05:15. Reason: a few clarifications / added paragraph (anti-trust laws)
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  9. Member
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    Interesting about the RMA process on Toshiba. Checking the Toshiba Europe site, it seems thereʻs no way for the consumer to process an RMA themselves as stated.

    As for data recovery services, anyone looking for a bargain priced drive is unlikely to have the need or willingness to pay for professional service. Anything important enough for me seek deep recovery is backed up immediately to at least one other drive.

    I know Iʻm in the very small minority, but Iʻve come to regard hard drives as disposable after the end of their warranty period, replacing the drive with a newer, usually larger one every 2-3 years. I live with the acceptance that any drive, hdd, SSD, flash, SD can die at any time without notice. I have way more time than money (which I donʻt have a lot of), but not stressing over, buying software and spending the time necessary for unbacked up data is well worth the $100-150 every two-three years buying a new replacement drive.
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