VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Italy
    Search Comp PM
    I've found a video where the audio track is compressed in MPEG Version2 Layer 3, while the common MP3 is in MPEG Version 1 Layer 3.
    The result is metallic, and is not audible!
    Is there a method to restore this audio track? I can use Audition but I cannot understand what can I do.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Mountains of gear vaporeon800's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Search PM
    It's an MP3 file. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3#Standardization

    You probably can't do much to improve it. The damage was done when the file was compressed & data was discarded.


    What are the details of the file? Sample rate, bit depth, bitrate?
    Quote Quote  
  3. Depends on what you're trying to extract/keep vs remove.

    https://new.steinberg.net/spectralayers/
    https://www.izotope.com/en/products/rx.html

    You'll likely exceed anything Audition can do with band pass filters and such. A spectral sound editor, or izotope would be the first place to start looking into advanced tools.

    But, no idea what you have and what you're trying to do, so without a sample track, that's the best guess advice
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    Mp3 means mpeg1 layer3, AND mpeg2 layer3. The part that mpeg2 added to the spec included support for higher & lower samplerates and higher & lower bitdepths, beyond what was already supported by mpeg1.

    You didn't tell us the specs of the file but I can guess...
    It probably is not corrupted/abnormal, nor is it an issue with player support (as literally everything supports both these days).
    It probably was encoded to too low of a bitrate (e.g. <64kbps) for the material. If that is the case, then there is NOTHING you can do, other than go back to the uncompressed original (please hope you kept a copy), and re-encode with better settings.

    I have never witnessed an attempt to "restore" the sound of an overly-compressed file that didn't end up robbing Peter to pay Paul, and mostly sound worse.

    Scott
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads