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  1. I got a bunch of concatenated videos and since I used the same codec I assumed that everything was fine at the time but today when I tried to watch them I noticed the audio is totally messed up and after doing some research I found out that it's because each video has a different sample rate and merging them without converting first caused the problem, now is there a solution to fix this? I tried converting the audio to different sample rates but that didn't fix anything.

    UPDATE: Wait what? I was going to delete everything re-do hours of work then I tried using windows 10 video player Movies&TV instead of my main video player VLC and that fixed the AUDIO!! I don't understand why the best video player out there would struggle with this..

    Solved the problem by changing the audio codec using ffmpeg: ffmpeg -i 1.mkv -acodec mp3 -vcodec copy out.mkv

    Now it plays fine on VLC.
    Last edited by Felow; 9th Jan 2020 at 01:01. Reason: Solved
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  2. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    not unless you still have the originals
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  3. Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    not unless you still have the originals
    I see.. Well at least I learned something, next time I'll set the encoder to convert the audio to 48khz for everything. Thanks.
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  4. Messed up how?
    The audio doesn't sync with the people talking and such?

    Or it sounds wrong?

    If it's the first, yes.
    You'd have to cut the audio out for each clip section, resample it to match the video, combine. You'd use markers on the video and audio tracks indicating key points to align both.
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  5. Originally Posted by babygdav View Post
    Messed up how?
    The audio doesn't sync with the people talking and such?

    Or it sounds wrong?

    If it's the first, yes.
    You'd have to cut the audio out for each clip section, resample it to match the video, combine. You'd use markers on the video and audio tracks indicating key points to align both.
    It sounds wrong audio like stuttering, cutting, missing sounds or no audio at all.

    It's fine what's done is done and I learnt a valuable lesson as I said next time I will convert everything to 44.1khz.. but can I mix bitrate without problems? like 128kbps+160kbps but with same sample rate.

    UPDATE: Wait what? I was going to delete everything re-do days of work then I tried using windows 10 video player Movies&TV instead of my main video player VLC and that fixed the AUDIO!!
    Last edited by Felow; 8th Jan 2020 at 23:23.
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  6. That's Nice!
    But I wonder what format the audio is in....

    Right-click on the file, properties -> under the details tab I believe.
    Or
    Try media player home classic mphc.
    Play the file, right click on the window, properties -> last codec tab.

    What format, bitrate, is the audio?
    (E.g. Mp3 44.1khz 320 kpbs)


    What program did you use to create it?

    Very odd vlc doesn't play it correctly, so want to make sure nothing's wrong for the future for the settings.
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  7. Originally Posted by babygdav View Post
    That's Nice!
    But I wonder what format the audio is in....

    Right-click on the file, properties -> under the details tab I believe.
    Or
    Try media player home classic mphc.
    Play the file, right click on the window, properties -> last codec tab.

    What format, bitrate, is the audio?
    (E.g. Mp3 44.1khz 320 kpbs)


    What program did you use to create it?

    Very odd vlc doesn't play it correctly, so want to make sure nothing's wrong for the future for the settings.
    I guess media info has more info so here you go: Audio
    ID : 2
    Format : AAC LC
    Format/Info : Advanced Audio Codec Low Complexity
    Codec ID : A_AAC-2
    Duration : 3 h 13 min
    Channel(s) : 2 channels
    Channel layout : L R
    Sampling rate : 44.1 kHz
    Frame rate : 43.066 FPS (1024 SPF)
    Compression mode : Lossy
    Delay relative to video : -46 ms
    Title : Stereo
    Default : Yes
    Forced : No

    Edit: Solved the problem by changing the audio codec using ffmpeg: ffmpeg -i 1.mkv -acodec mp3 -vcodec copy out.mkv
    Last edited by Felow; 9th Jan 2020 at 00:49. Reason: Solved
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  8. Nice!
    Stick with tried and true codecs like MP4 and MP3 to prevent major issues. These are almost dummy proof.

    ...

    As for combining videos with different bitrates, resolutions, and such, usually, most modern, top video editors like Adobe Premiere, Avid Media Composer, Vegas Video, and Blackmagic Davinci will let you add them all onto one timeline, export to one combined, properly playing file.

    Of these, two are free - Avid Media First and Blackmagic Davinci. Try Blackmagic first since it has recently added a powerful audio editor.

    ...

    If you use ffmpeg, certain switches may be useful - video_track_timescale, itsoffset, concat, ar, asetrate.
    Because there are so many recording bitrates, frequencies, bit depths, formats, etc, etc., you will have to manually confirm the sync of combined clips until you get the hang of whatever you need to do to get those clips to combine properly.

    However, it can be far easier to drop the videos into Blackmagic (and even if just for the audio, export the combined audio track into a file you can combine with the videos in ffmpeg.).
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  9. Originally Posted by babygdav View Post
    Nice!
    Stick with tried and true codecs like MP4 and MP3 to prevent major issues. These are almost dummy proof.

    ...

    As for combining videos with different bitrates, resolutions, and such, usually, most modern, top video editors like Adobe Premiere, Avid Media Composer, Vegas Video, and Blackmagic Davinci will let you add them all onto one timeline, export to one combined, properly playing file.

    Of these, two are free - Avid Media First and Blackmagic Davinci. Try Blackmagic first since it has recently added a powerful audio editor.

    ...

    If you use ffmpeg, certain switches may be useful - video_track_timescale, itsoffset, concat, ar, asetrate.
    Because there are so many recording bitrates, frequencies, bit depths, formats, etc, etc., you will have to manually confirm the sync of combined clips until you get the hang of whatever you need to do to get those clips to combine properly.

    However, it can be far easier to drop the videos into Blackmagic (and even if just for the audio, export the combined audio track into a file you can combine with the videos in ffmpeg.).
    I usually use avidemux to cut and merge and avoid ffmpeg I only use it as a last resort since the commands are hard to remember and I prefer a GUI. I will try Blackmagic tonight and see how it it's thanks.
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