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  1. Member
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    Hi,

    I have the following problem:

    I use the Sony FDR-AX33 camcorder for video recording and I'm recording in 4K (XAVC S).
    The resulting clips are in .mp4 format (H.264) and have a resolution of 3840x2160.

    When I create a BluRay from this footage in Corel VideoStudio Ultimate 2019 (version 22.3.0.433, 64-bit), everything is fine.
    However, when I create a DVD from this material, the picture on a 4K TV (Samsung UE55KU6099U) with played on a Samsung BluRay player (BD-H6500) always looks mushy.

    I proceeded in two ways, but actually always with the same miserable result:

    1. The 4K clips imported and processed in VideoStudio and finally output as MPEG-2 (1920x1080, 50i or 25p). These .mpg clips were then authored as DVDs with menus and burned to DVD.
    2. The 4K clips were first re-encoded in MPEG-2 files using XMedia Recode. These were then processed again in VideoStudio and output on DVD.

    With both approaches, the result looks (not great but) good on a normal Full HD TV, but actually quite mushy on my 4K TV (this is particularly noticeable on faces).
    I can't change the upscaling of the Samsung TV, but normal purchased DVDs also look good here.

    It would be really great if I could get tips on how my DVDs also look good and not as rough and mushy.

    Regards
    Delta
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  2. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    how long is the video you are putting on dvd? to get a decently high bitrate that might look ok on 4k it probably shouldn't be more than 90 minutes, 60 would be better.

    you might try exporting from videostudio in lossless avi or at a very high bitrate mp4 and then letting AVStoDVD do the conversion.
    --
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    Hi aedipuss,

    thanks for your fast reply !

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    how long is the video you are putting on dvd?
    The footage consists of 37 small clips (10 seconds to 7 minutes). The final video is about 45 minutes.

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    to get a decently high bitrate that might look ok on 4k it probably shouldn't be more than 90 minutes, 60 would be better.
    So, the length of my video doesn't exceed your recommendations. But once I'm done with authoring I select output to DVD and VideoStudio sets the following vales:

    24 Bit, 720 x 576, 25 fps
    (DVD-PAL), 16:9
    Videorate: Variabel (Max. 8000 kbps)
    Audionrate: 384 kbps
    Dolby Digital-Audio, 48 KHz, 2/0(L,R)

    So I can't influence the bitrate.

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    you might try exporting from videostudio in lossless avi or at a very high bitrate mp4 and then letting AVStoDVD do the conversion.
    This would apply for the single clips as I did in my second approach. I can't do that for the final video, right ?
    Do you mean, I should first export every single 4K clip to lossless avi or very high bitrate mp4, then convert to what ?
    Or should I convert the whole final output ? This would mean, I produce a BluRay first and convert this to DVD using AVStoDVD ?

    Please excuse my maybe silly questions, but I thought when using high quality source (4k) even the SD output on DVD would lokk good on my 4K-TV as purchased DVDs do

    Regards
    Delta
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  4. Member DB83's Avatar
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    The issue is more likely to be one of the intermediate steps. As you point out, 4K footage reduced to SD should be quite sharp at sufficient bitrate. But if one of those steps has crippled the bitrate then a high bitrate at the final encode is not going to bring the picture back.
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  5. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    first i'd try using avstodvd with the source files. set the preferences to what you want, i.e things like pal. take the source clips and drop them into the source titles box and click start. it's free and it uses a high quality mpeg-2 encoder(Henc).
    --
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  6. 1. "The resulting clips are in .mp4 format (H.264) and have a resolution of 3840x2160.
    When I create a BluRay from this footage in Corel VideoStudio Ultimate 2019 (version 22.3.0.433, 64-bit), everything is fine.
    However, when I create a DVD from this material, the picture on a 4K TV (Samsung UE55KU6099U) with played on a Samsung BluRay player (BD-H6500) always looks mushy."

    THIS is not a problem. This is a FACT of LIFE due to the output media you are using.
    Your INPUT is 4K video 3840x2160.
    BluRay is 2K 1920x1080. (Notice you need 4 2K images in a 2x2 pattern to equal the pixels of a 4K image)
    DVD is less than 1K 740x480.

    You are taking a GREAT video, then down-sizing it to 2K (1/4 the quality of 4K), and 1K (less than 1/4 the quality of 1K).

    "MUSHY" - what can you expect? Of course it's mushy because you reduced the resolution of the 4K original by more than 16x to make a DVD.

    2. The use of HIGH DVD BITRATE and the use of DOUBLE-LAYER DVDs is a MUST!
    Commercial DVDs are double-layer discs. Almost all burnable DVDs used at home are single-layer discs, which contain about 1/2 the storage space.
    1/2 the storage space = about 1/2 the video quality of burned videos versus double-layer discs.

    a. BUY and USE Verbatim DVD-R DL (double layer) discs to begin with.

    b. You will need to adjust the export BITRATE to FILL that double-layer disc as completely as possible.
    Some programs don't let you adjust this bitrate, but does it automatically. As a result, you have partially empty discs = lower quality videos.

    If the video isn't too long, you can adjust the video bitrate up to around the 9MB/second maximum sustained bitrate DVD players generally can handle (some players can go a bit higher, but you'll only know when you test).

    c. Notice that commerical DVDs typically do NOT put more than about 2 1/2 hours of video on a DVD. Putting more on a single double-layer DVD forces a LOWER bitrate.
    Longer videos than about 2 hours on a DVD = poorer quality videos.

    3. Ideally, you'd buy a bluray burner for <$100, a bluray player for <$40, and burn to BluRay discs in 2K.
    This gets you noticeably better quality without much work.

    4. If you are watching the home videos at home for enjoyment, why burn?
    Simply leave everything on a hard drive, then playback from that.

    a. Many ways to do that from local media player to networked.

    b. Local media player - tons of these on ebay.com for <$40 - just plug in a hard drive and play what media is on them. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18M4WsdFmjM)

    c. Networked.
    You have everything from windows 10 TV casting (laptop/pc directly to smart TV/Fire/Roku/etc) to MythTV/Plex setups (more complex).

    d. PS4 or Xbox One - Both can play media off a hard drive attached to them on a TV.
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  7. You can ignore much of what the previous poster wrote. It's not 740x480 but 720x576 (as you already know and stated in your post). And, as you only have 45 minutes of video, you couldn't make use of a dual-layer DVD even if you wanted to. The advice to leave it alone and either put it on a USB stick or play from a networked drive or burn as data at the full 4K is good (if your player will play it ), but I assume you have your own reasons for making a DVD, like to share with family or something.

    Originally Posted by Delta123 View Post
    So I can't influence the bitrate.
    Yes you can. You can easily boost the maximum bitrate to 9000 and even a little bit over. You might make available 10 seconds of the finished DVD for us to go over and perhaps make suggestions.

    And, as aedipuss mentioned, you might send the original MP4 cllps to AvsToDVD to see if it will do a better job. I'd bet it will.
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  8. 1. Number of clips and runtime is shorter than the maximum of a double layer dvd this time, but in general, if you'll be filming more in the future and exceeding about 60 minutes, you'll need to use double layer discs. (Using 9000kbps video + 320kpbs audio)

    2. It could be the video encoding parameters are not properly set.
    In VideoStudio, if available, set video encoding to
    9000kbps
    Cbr (or constant)
    Two pass

    3. If no such is available, poor program.
    Export the edited video as one 4k mp4 file (high quality settings).

    Then feed it through a ffmpeg encoder.
    E.g. https://www.videohelp.com/software/AVStoDVD

    Notice the settings
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/353284-AVStoDVD-beginners-guide-Any-video-to-DVD-Video

    9000kpbs
    Cbr
    High quality
    Two pass

    Burn the output to dvd as noted
    https://www.videohelp.com/software/ImgBurn

    ...

    Yes, there's old talk here about mpeg-2 encoder and which is better in quality (E.g. Mainconcept (stand alone and in Vegas Video) and Sirus http://siriuspixels.com/Sirius-Pixels-SDe-MPEG-2-Encoder.php) vs ffmpeg, tmpgenc https://tmpgenc.pegasys-inc.com/en/index.html, etc), but you can investigate that after the above test since two pass ffmpeg should be pretty good from a 4k source.
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  9. Another issue depending on your source video settings is interlace and field order.

    If you're original videos are not progressive videos (eg 25p, 60p), but are interlaced (50i), and the video software is misinterpreting the field order on its way to the dvd encode, you'll get poorer quality.

    "Field orders are as follows:

    HD, including HDV, Upper Field First.
    NTSC SD all codecs, Lower Field First
    PAL SD All codecs except DV, DVCAM, 25Mb/s DV XDCAM,Upper Field First
    PAL SD DV, DVCAM, 25Mb/s DV XDCAM Lower Field First.

    The PAL DV field order reversal causes a lot of issues"

    ...

    You'll notice incorrect field order if you see things like
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YczLRshnxQ8
    1:24
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  10. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H9fP8m9eEFY
    8:44
    Notice the settings panel for the dvd.

    Set to 9000kbps
    Constant (not variable)
    Select two pass
    Quality

    ...

    Also, in the general program settings, try turning off hardware acceleration for encoding

    http://product.corel.com/help/VideoStudio/540230380/Main/EN/Documentation/wwhelp/wwhim...ml&single=true

    This usually uses the Intel Quicksync feature which is Not the best encode quality.
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  11. Member DB83's Avatar
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    I have to say this.

    Yet I see contributions that have little or even no relevance to this topic.

    And I even see contributions with contradict opinion from the same poster in different topics.

    Which makes me think that this poster has no real experience in this genre or, to put a finer point on it, is talking out of his right (or left) buttock.

    Take, for example the latest missive. It is generally accepted that VBR will give better quality than CBR. There may be situations that CBR will give better but without having any indication from samples from the OP one can not tell - and one can not simply quote an example from yt whose contributors often have even less knowledge.

    And I have been encoding dvds for more years than some who may even have been in short trousers when I started. In fact CBR may even create a worse visual experience (I chose my words carefully) than VBR.
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    Hi all,

    I used AVStoDVD to convert the original 4k .mp4 files with the following settings for video:
    DVD Video Standard: PAL
    DVD video resolution: Auto
    Video Encoder: HCenc VBR 2-pass
    lower bitrate: 4500 kbps
    upper bitrate: 9000 kbps

    The resulting .mpg files I dropped into the time line of VideoStudio and applied the Mercalli stabilizer (just for completeness - I don't think, that has any influence).

    I configured VideoStudio under Settings - Performance to not use NVidia CUDA hardware acceleration.
    For the output in VideoStudio I select DVD and applied tzhe following settings:
    MPEG settings: Ulead MPEG.Now Encoder (no other choice possible)
    Compression: 100%
    2-pass encoding
    Videorate: constant 9000kbps
    Field order Upper field first

    The output was a DVD structure, which i burned using Ashampoo Burning Studio 2018.
    The result on 4K-TV was creepy.

    My second approach was to output from VideoStudio not to DVD structure but to a MPEG-4 file with the foloowing settings:
    3840x2160, 25p, 40Mbps
    This output file was processed by AVStoDVD to produce a DVD structure with size DVD-9 and the settings below:
    DVD Video Standard: PAL
    DVD video resolution: Auto
    Video Encoder: HCenc VBR 2-pass
    lower bitrate: 4500 kbps
    upper bitrate: 9000 kbps

    The result on my 4K-TV was creepy again. I will try to attach screenshots from this horror show - look at the faces !!!

    To answer some outstanding questions:
    Of course I can do use some of the possibilities which babygdav mentioned, but what I want to do is to use this high quality footage to produce DVD with a sharp picture. Reason for that is, the this video was taken from a christmas concert of my sons school and want to give away some copies to the teachers who conducted the performances and some friends and relatives (as manono already correctly suggested). Since I do not know, if every one has a Blue Ray player (my mother is already happy, when she manages to send an SMS) I was looking for a medium that everybody can play - which is DVD.

    @manono: What kind of output would you need: the .mp4 of the second attempt is about 4GB and the resulting VOB is about 1MB
    the VOB of the first attempt is about 1GB.

    I'm really very thankful for all your comments and inputs, but I'm beginnign top think it is almost impossible to use 4K footage for producing a DVD - although commercial DVD do this. But what is the way ?

    Regards
    Delta
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  13. Member DB83's Avatar
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    But how did the initial mpeg files from avstodvd appear ?

    The above images are not at dvd resolution. They have been up-scaled but I guess your player and or your tv does upscaling better than this pc generated image.

    Now back to avstodvd. Just for one moment forget about VideoStudio and create the dvd direct in that program as a test for your player/tv or in another free program such as dvd-styler which will not recompress your video - it makes absolutely no sense to take VBR mpegs and re-encode them as CBR. There is already quality loss with the encode. And if you really must filter/stabilise then do not do it from mpeg but as high a definition as you can.

    And from avstodvd you can use another free program imgburn to burn the dvd folders from avstodvd to disk.
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  14. CBR vs VBR - I picked CBR to help test the system he has to see what is causing the problem he is encountering, not optimizing for the very best encode at high bitrate (which would require him to use one of the better MPEG-2 encoders rather than the program he is using how, along with many tweaks for optimization - here, Sirus Pixels, TMPGENC, etc. Example of the numerous parameters that can be adjusted for the very best encodes - http://dvd-hq.info/dvd_compression.php).

    9000kbps is at the generally accepted, perceptual limits of quality a DVD can produce.
    Using PSNR as a broad gauge of visual quality (the two are not the same), as bitrate increases from 1000kpbs to 9000kpbs mpeg-2 encoding, the PSNR increases.
    Additionally, using MPQM, another broad gauge of visual quality, the same occurs.
    http://www.nossdav.org/1998/papers/nossdav98-010.pdf

    At the 8000+ rate, you approach 95% quality level (based on MPQM - 100% being the very best any DVD can produce, not the best NTSC/PAL resolution picture you can get). In other words, you'll need to pixel peep at frames to see the 5% difference for most people watching the DVDs as a regular viewer. The use of CBR vs VBR at high bitrates will not magically make one suddenly far Better than the other, much like many can't tell the difference between a 320kpbs cbr vs vbr lame mp3 encode using the best settings for each.

    The key here is Perceptual quality - what does your eyes tell you and the majority of viewers.
    Because I'm approaching this from a testing standpoint, not an optimization standpoint, there's no reason to spend the time or energy to come up with an optimized VBR output path simply to figure out what's causing the soft/mushy output.

    (Consistently, you'll see as bitrate goes up, PSNR differences shrink - https://www.diemtech.com/media/uploads/2010-05-03-Ericsson_EN8100_final_v1.1.pdf http://www.icst.pku.edu.cn/GraphicsLab/docs/2018-11/20181119140027128654.pdf - roughly reflecting the same shrinking in perceptual differences.)

    ...

    Naturally, if the final disc visual quality is of utmost importance (eg. home videos, weddings, etc), my first suggestion would NOT be to use DVDs if at all possible, but instead encode to H.264 blurays for significantly better visual quality due to MUCH high resolution & bitrate and better codec used vs. mpeg-2 dvds.
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  15. Send a screenshot of your VideoStudio program when you have this project loaded.
    Are the two screenshots from the TV? Or from your PC monitor?

    For the video that we see in the screenshots, create a new project.
    Cut 10 seconds out of the clip around the scene we see.
    Export to a MP4 FILE at the same 4k resolution you filmed it in, at a HIGH bitrate (25000kbps or 25MB/s or higher is sufficient), and post it somewhere (eg. mediafire.com, onedrive.com, google drive).

    Need to examine the original to see...

    Or better yet, if you have a 5-10 second XAVC mp4 video clip that is straight from the camera, upload that!

    ...

    I might have to run to the library to use their FAST wifi to install VideoStudio and try it out to see myself what's going on...
    Last edited by babygdav; 7th Jan 2020 at 17:55.
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  16. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    why are the shots displayed at such a weird resolution? 3840x2880 is not acceptable on any tv.
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  17. The source didn't look like those pictures? The output from HC-Enc didn't look like those pictures? The problem began after you messed with the video some more by stabilizing, upscaling and reencoding yet again? The upscaler must be awful if it produced those mask-like faces. Why did you think that upscaling after already downscaling for DVD might be a good idea?

    You have to understand that the more you reencode using lossy codecs the worse it gets.
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    Originally Posted by manono View Post
    The source didn't look like those pictures? The output from HC-Enc didn't look like those pictures? The problem began after you messed with the video some more by stabilizing, upscaling and reencoding yet again? The upscaler must be awful if it produced those mask-like faces. Why did you think that upscaling after already downscaling for DVD might be a good idea?

    You have to understand that the more you reencode using lossy codecs the worse it gets.
    I took a quick look at that and assumed he'd applied some sort of water color artistic filter.
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  19. Image
    [Attachment 51361 - Click to enlarge]
    https://ibb.co/2WTmqRQ

    Okay, I took another 4K Sony XAVC 25p file (RX100 iv 4K 25p SLOG 2 S-GAMUT Native 4K XAVC-S file) to test.
    The 4K video has the full 4K resolution and detail, so no worries about the input.

    imported it directly into the timeline of VideoStudio. (File -> Insert media into timeline, answer yes to adjust timeline specs to match footage).
    Verified it's at 4k (Settings, project properties, MPEG-4 Files
    24 bits, 3840 x 2160, 25 fps
    Frame-based
    H.264 High Profile Video: 99999 Kbps, 16:9
    48000 Hz, 16 Bit, Stereo
    LPCM Audio: 768 Kbps)

    ...

    Tested a MP4 export to 1920x1080 25p. Looks fine.

    ...

    Tested a DVD export to folder using both CBR and VBR with 2-pass modes, 8000kbps (Also, tried setting frame interlace output to auto instead of bottom/top field).

    Uh, oh!

    CRAPTASTIC OUTPUT!!!!!
    Vegas Video 17 output for Pal 25 FPS DVD on the left, Videostudio on the right.

    Look at the woman's shirt (one on the left on the bench). Or even the bottom of Turnham Green on the sign.
    CRAP! Can't see the lines on her shirt, bottom of the text is mushy.

    .....

    PROBLEM SOLVED!!!
    You're using a crappy program for DVD output.
    Last edited by babygdav; 7th Jan 2020 at 20:40.
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  20. Member DB83's Avatar
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    ^^ A little tip.

    Images really should be sent direct to a reply as an attachment. Readers looking at the topic in time to come may find a non-existent link.

    But I am not concerned with either Vegas or VideoStudio (although I have used both in the past). I want to see how avstodvd with a perfectly capable mpeg2 encoder and tried and tested frame resizers have dealt with the original.

    So I will concur that we need an appropriate sample from the original footage. Some clarification of the source of those pixelated caps will also be welcome.
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  21. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by babygdav View Post
    Image
    [Attachment 51361 - Click to enlarge]
    https://ibb.co/2WTmqRQ

    Okay, I took another 4K Sony XAVC 25p file (RX100 iv 4K 25p SLOG 2 S-GAMUT Native 4K XAVC-S file) to test.
    The 4K video has the full 4K resolution and detail, so no worries about the input.

    imported it directly into the timeline of VideoStudio. (File -> Insert media into timeline, answer yes to adjust timeline specs to match footage).
    Verified it's at 4k (Settings, project properties, MPEG-4 Files
    24 bits, 3840 x 2160, 25 fps
    Frame-based
    H.264 High Profile Video: 99999 Kbps, 16:9
    48000 Hz, 16 Bit, Stereo
    LPCM Audio: 768 Kbps)

    ...

    Tested a MP4 export to 1920x1080 25p. Looks fine.

    ...

    Tested a DVD export to folder using both CBR and VBR with 2-pass modes, 8000kbps (Also, tried setting frame interlace output to auto instead of bottom/top field).

    Uh, oh!

    CRAPTASTIC OUTPUT!!!!!
    Vegas Video 17 output for Pal 25 FPS DVD on the left, Videostudio on the right.

    Look at the woman's shirt (one on the left on the bench). Or even the bottom of Turnham Green on the sign.
    CRAP! Can't see the lines on her shirt, bottom of the text is mushy.

    .....

    PROBLEM SOLVED!!!
    You're using a crappy program for DVD output.
    might just be a crappy de-interlacer on your video preview.
    mostly it looks ok for dvd spec video. you've only got less than 1/16 the resolution of 4k to start with and bad de-interlacing on top.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  22. Hey, wait a moment.
    I was re-reading to find clues and in the sample you provided, you said
    "I used AVStoDVD to convert the original 4k .mp4 files with the following settings for video:
    DVD Video Standard: PAL
    DVD video resolution: Auto
    Video Encoder: HCenc VBR 2-pass
    lower bitrate: 4500 kbps
    upper bitrate: 9000 kbps

    The resulting .mpg files I dropped into the time line of VideoStudio and applied the Mercalli stabilizer (just for completeness - I don't think, that has any influence)."

    WHY ON EARTH are you encoding the original camcorder files to a LOWER RESOLUTION BEFORE you import them into the video editor???
    NEVER EVER do this to retain the highest quality possible!!
    Every time you re-encode, the quality drops.
    This is especially bad when you drop the resolution before importing the video.
    So now you have one encode BEFORE you import, then a second encode AFTER you export to DVD, and possibly a third if you apply a stabilizing effect.
    IMPORT 4K, edit 4K, apply effects in 4K, and finally output to lower-resolution DVD at the very end.

    ..........................
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  23. Image
    [Attachment 51362 - Click to enlarge]


    Okay, here's a 25p (PAL non-interlaced) 10 second 4K sample input file to try out.
    I pushed it through both Adobe Media Encoder (output as MPEG-2 DVD 25p Pal using quality 10/max, render using best, VBR 2-pass, etc)
    and VideoStudio (output to DVD FOLDER - 25p Pal, quality 10/max, VBR 2-pass).

    100% playback, screen captured each three, layered them in Photoshop side-by-side with an area of interest to compare all three.

    ....

    Note that the 4K (left of three images) is naturally quite detailed and sharp - you can see the rivets on the roof of the train, the leaves of the tree, the wood grain in the bench, the stripes on the woman's shirt.
    Note that the DVD quality renders (middle, right) are both less detailed and sharp than the 4K.

    The difference is that the Adobe DVD render is sharper/more detailed in the leaves and the bench, and the stripes are less mushy/blurry when compared versus the Corel output.

    ...

    Anyways, if this is not the mushy quality you are talking about, take the 4K sample, drop it into your VideoStudio timeline (new project), then burn to DVD (25p, 2-pass, pal, VBR, quality 10/max/100% - you'll need to go into the DVD settings to adjust these).

    What does it look like on your TV?
    Image Attached Files
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  24. Are you doing a "crop" / "zoom" in on a specific face or person in VideoStudio on that second photo?
    If you have converted the video from 4K to DVD resolution, then imported it into VS, then you're only working with a 720x pixel resolution video that cannot stand that kind of zooming/cropping. You'll need to go from the original 4K video, import that into a 4K timeline, then zoom/crop.
    (In the photo example, right is using a 4k input, cropped and zoomed in on, output to DVD - good. Left is using 720/DVD resolution input, cropped and zoomed, output - bad.)

    Image
    [Attachment 51366 - Click to enlarge]
    Image
    [Attachment 51367 - Click to enlarge]
    Image
    [Attachment 51368 - Click to enlarge]
    Image
    [Attachment 51369 - Click to enlarge]
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    Hi all,

    here are my answers to the questions that arose since my last post:
    - the photos I posted are taken with my mobile sitting in front of the screen. On the first photo you can see a bit of my TVs frame in the upper left corner. The second photo is taken while zooming in with my mobile again. So thjis really what my 4K tv shows. These pictures haven't been processed on a PC and there is no "artistic wate color filter" put on - although I have to admit, that it looks like that...
    Insert DVD - press PLAY - press PAUSE - take photo with my mobile - that's all I did to get these pictures.

    The two screenshots are taken from the same (paused) scene, the second one is zoomed in with my mobile

    I made a new short video from the same clip with DVDStyler (see dvdstyler.iso) which looks the same kind of ugly on my 4K.
    I also put the DVD output from AVStoDVD (see DVD_from_AVStoDVD) on the drive, which also looks horrible.
    Please find also the video made from the station clip together with the photos I again took with my mobile in front of the TV screen.

    Could it be, that what I see is not caused by my video editing but by my BluRay player or my TV ?
    But I checked all the settings on both devices and it made no difference.
    And why do commeercial DVDs look normal.
    When comparing my videos to babygdavs station4k.MP4 or stationDVDadobe.mpg there are worlds between !

    Any help is highly appreciated !

    Here are the links, where I uploaded all the folders, files and screenshots:
    https://we.tl/t-QNe2sVi2pv
    https://we.tl/t-ZMxH8yqPgt
    https://we.tl/t-YLk20tqoac

    Regards
    Delta
    Last edited by Delta123; 8th Jan 2020 at 13:20.
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  26. Member DB83's Avatar
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    Thank you for the samples.

    Technically, there is little wrong with the dvd from avstodvd (as I would have expected). The VBR is a little under 8000 kbps and you could hardly go much higher since you chose to encode the audio as LPCM. The dvd is progressive as is the source.

    The dvd from VideoStudio is also ok although it is now reported as interlaced bottom field-first whereas mpeg2 should be top field-first.

    Both of these look reasonable when up-scaled on my 1080 monitor yet I can see minor pixilation at the zoom-in point which I guess is why a further upscale to 4K has magnified this.

    I can not encode the 4K sample since my PC is not powerful enough to handle the bitrate. Maybe someone else will have a go at it.

    Now our friend has used an encoder which is not at our disposal so that may well explain the variation in the results. Even his PC may be more powerful than yours.

    And this may also explain why studios can do this. They do not use standard PCs. They use very powerful servers etc. and encode very, very slowly with professional encoders way beyond a layman's budget.

    But I would proceed and create your copies. After all not everyone has 4K tvs (I certainly do not) and at the end of the day it is the thought in the gift that counts.
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    The source footage is 50 fps, but if you look at it frame by frame, there are only 25 unique frames p/s.
    AVStoDVD decimates the duplicate to give a progressive encode at 25 fps. Not sure what happened
    to the A2D sample provided, the OP neglected to include the run log.
    My PC is also on the slow side, but I will endeavor to do an encode
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  28. Image
    [Attachment 51385 - Click to enlarge]

    1. There's nothing significantly "wrong" with the source given the sensor size and age of the camcorder.
    It is a 5 year old model that uses a standard 1/2.3" point and shoot camera sized sensor, attempting to produce 4k video.

    The areas I've noted in text in the screenshot of the original video show you what areas of the image suffer due to the small size, low light, etc.
    ie. The only way to improve future videos (better 4K detail, lower noise) is to upgrade to a 1" 4K Sony Camcorder, or better, far larger 4/3rds/APS/Full-frame dslr camera with 4K video.

    2. When downsizing video (eg. going from 4K original to 2K or DVD output), much of these noise and other artifacts are eliminated or reduced due to the way downsizing works (blends things together).
    So, for your DVD output (in the ISO you provided), it generally looks fine and as "detailed" as you can expect for a DVD and your source video.
    ie. It looks like a very good home video on my TV.

    3. The VideoStudio encoder does produce artifacts on its own.
    Image
    [Attachment 51388 - Click to enlarge]


    If you examine the dark area to the right of the drum (play it on a PC, 200% zoom if needed), you can see that this area PULSES.
    This pulsing is not present in the original video, so it is something the VideoStudio encoder introduced.

    Besides this very visible artifact however, the rest of the video looks like any regular home video on the TV.

    ........

    Now, let's put aside #3 and the very slight softness of the VideoStudio encode (which isn't what you're seeing on TV).

    Something else is causing the blurry images you see on TV (violin bows, faces) because the DVD ISO is fine (I mean, you should see on TV approximately what you see in the 2nd image I posted in #3 for detail in the faces, violins, etc.).

    ........

    So, what is your current home theater ....

    You should be using a HDMI cable from the DVD player into the TV.
    On the TV, try turning off the Motion Plus feature if present.
    try putting the station.mp4 video I posted earlier, or a video of your own that's compatible on a USB flash drive, plug it into the TV, and see what it looks like in comparison to the DVD (ie. both should look as good as DVD home videos generally do).

    On the bluray player, try the disc with UHD Output on and off. Could very well be an upscaling issue.
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2017/05/21/ultra-high-def-tv-image-probl...uhd/101948474/

    turn deep color on and off - this can mess with outputting 4k properly
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjR6jjSw1_U

    Based on the above, sounds like a bad Samsung design issue.

    ....

    Same with Movie Frame 24fs on and off.
    Turn DVD 24fs conversion off.
    Turn Progressive mode on and off.

    Try plugging a laptop with DVD or PC with DVD into the HDMI cable going into the DVD player. Play your DVD disc on the PC, through the HDMI cable into the TV. How does it look?
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    I had problems in mpc-be with the OP's DVD samples. After disabling its internal DVD decoder and using the system-wide Lav filters
    it displays just fine. Not sure what is wrong in mpc-be, looks like some kind of interlacing interference, even though the source is progressive
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  30. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    It is a 5 year old model that uses a standard 1/2.3" point and shoot camera sized sensor, attempting to produce 4k video
    what is it exactly?

    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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