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  1. Hi All, I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with wireless HDMI? I believe they are called extenders. I'd like to share my cable feed with a couple other TV's in the house without cabling (not sure which forum to use, so I put it here).

    thx,

    Brad
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    For lite/consumer use & reliability, I'd suggest the IOGEAR.
    https://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-Wireless-Digital-Channel-GW3DHDKIT/dp/B00630WKGI/ref=asc...a-569349330174

    For 24/7/365 corporate/industrial heavier use & reliability, I'd go with Extron eLink100 (around $1100USD msrp for xmit+rcvr pair).
    https://www.extron.com/mobile/products/product.aspx?id=elink100#aspnetForm

    Scott
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  3. Scott,

    Both the OP's question and your response are very timely. Thank you!

    I have a follow-up question.

    Would I be better off using one of the two products you mention, or would I get better quality and HDMI handshaking reliability by using some sort of convertor to go over either RG6 coax or Cat5 cable? I have both of these cables "home-runned" from every room in the house back to the media equipment closet. I did that in 1994 when all the walls were torn down, but since I didn't put them in conduit, it would be impossible to upgrade that now.

    I know that most HDMI convertors prefer two Cat6 runs, rather than a single Cat5 cable, but doing that to every room is out of the question for me (maybe the MB, but that's all).

    I am less clear as to whether RG6 coax can be used.

    I don't think I'm hijacking this since it's a pretty similar question to the OP's, and may perhaps help him as well.
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    There probably are HDbaseT adapter offerings that use standard consumer cat5, but there probably would be bandwidth issues.
    In my work at my university, I primarily use extron (90%) or Creston (10%) units, which REQUIRE shielded cat5e/6 or better.

    Remember a few years ago at infocomm a chinese company hawking hdmi-over-Anything, but don't remember the name. Will see if it pops up in my pix...

    Scott
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  5. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    There probably are HDbaseT adapter offerings that use standard consumer cat5, but there probably would be bandwidth issues.
    In my work at my university, I primarily use extron (90%) or Creston (10%) units, which REQUIRE shielded cat5e/6 or better.

    Remember a few years ago at infocomm a chinese company hawking hdmi-over-Anything, but don't remember the name. Will see if it pops up in my pix...

    Scott
    Many thanks. I'll look at he Extron offerings.
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Np. Found it from a picture: https://www.lenkeng.net/.
    They advertised video extending over:
    • Cat5/5e/6
    • Wireless
    • Fiber
    • Powerline
    • RF control (?)
    • "Any 2 wires" (?)
    Can't vouch for their quality, though. I *CAN* vouch for Extron or Crestron stuff.

    Scott
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  7. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Np. Found it from a picture: https://www.lenkeng.net/.
    They advertised video extending over:
    • Cat5/5e/6
    • Wireless
    • Fiber
    • Powerline
    • RF control (?)
    • "Any 2 wires" (?)
    Can't vouch for their quality, though. I *CAN* vouch for Extron or Crestron stuff.

    Scott
    I'm looking at that now:

    https://www.lenkeng.net/Index/detail/id/1606

    As I look at it, along with the Cat5e/Cat6 and RG6 solutions, I suddenly wondered: why are there so many solutions for Wi-Fi wireless most of which, on a good day, cannot sustain much more than 100 mbps, when even Cat5 can sustain close to 1,000 mbps, and do so with fewer retries?

    Bottom line: if these Wi-Fi solutions work, why shouldn't a Cat5 solution blow the Wi-Fi products out of the water?
    Last edited by johnmeyer; 3rd Dec 2019 at 13:32. Reason: typo
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  8. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Good question, but the gotcha is that they probably only support CERTAIN (read: lower) resolutions/framerates. You can't cheat bandwidth requirements.

    1080p60 is...
    1920x1080x60*2bytes (at4:2:2) = 1,990,656,000‬ bits/sec or just shy of 2Gbps. Not counting audio and control. Full 4:4:4 RGB would be ~3Gbps.

    Wired cat cable is RATED for a certain speed/BW, but may be able to exceed that speed/BW, with the understanding that there are length, data-collision, & external interference-related issues beyond the rating. Even for digital signals, when it comes to this kind of stuff, think: analog.

    Scott
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  9. I just figured that if streaming is reliable and of HD quality, why not wireless hdmi?
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  10. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Even for digital signals, when it comes to this kind of stuff, think: analog.
    Yeah, I thought about using RGB, since RGB HD works great, but I don't know if there is a way to multiplex/demultiplex this over a single RG6 connection.

    I guess this gives me one more thing to research.

    [edit]This item looks like it might do what I want:

    https://www.amazon.com/Extender-Coaxial-1640Ft-Transmitter-Receiver/dp/B0107W8OQ2
    Last edited by johnmeyer; 3rd Dec 2019 at 16:53. Reason: added link
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  11. Member DB83's Avatar
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    I guess you are looking for something like this

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/measy-FHD676-Transmission-Transmitter-PassThrough-black/dp/B0...409510&sr=8-39

    Over here the current DVB standard is known as SkyQ. In the past you required a cable from the dish LNB direct to a receiver in each room. Now two cables come from a different LNB to one receiver. Mini receivers in other rooms pick up the signals over Wi-Fi from the main receiver which is also connected to the router. Yet the broadcasts are totally independent. Picture and sound are perfect.
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  12. I found two products that get decent reviews and are intriguing:

    Mirabox HDMI Coax Extender Over Single RG59/RG-6U Coaxial Cable with F Type RF Coaxial Connectors (Supports 1080P)

    Mirabox HDMI Extender Over TCP IP Cat5 Cat5e Cat6 Cat6e (price is for a pair)

    The first item is what I was asking about. The second, however, appears more intriguing. I saw a YouTube video (yeah, I know ...) that tested half a dozen ways to transmit HDMI over a distance within a home, including the OP's desired wireless approach. If this HDMI over IP product works as well as the YouTube video showed and performs as well as the Amazon reviewers claim, it would let me take one HDMI signal, convert it to IP, put it through a simple, dedicated IP switch (i.e., no Internet or LAN traffic on that switch), and then send the HDMI video & audio to every location that has a wired Internet jack. The product claims to be able to do this not only over modern Cat6 (and beyond) but also over the humble Cat5 that I have installed in the walls to every room in the house.

    Both products are made by Mirabox, a company I've not heard of. I see very little chatter about it over on the AVS forum, which worries me, but I'm going to keep researching it because, if it works, it would be stupidly easy to finally replace my old analog NTSC multiplexer and CRT TVs (I still have four in everyday service) with modern LCDs and HD video.

    If this works, I'll start another thread to document my experience.

    Hopefully this gives the OP some ideas.
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  13. Thanks, John; just that the wired (Cat5/6) part of your suggestion is a deal breaker because the receiving TV only has power available, no wired LAN...just WiFi
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  14. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Most HDbaseT stuff is NOT compatible with standard IP switches (in their normal configuration and at normal consumer/prosumer prices). Certainly not while piggybacking on standard data traffic.

    For that, you need AVoverIP or similar, which has much higher bandwidth requirements (1 Gbps is minimum, usu. 10Gbps expected).

    Scott
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  15. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    @bbowens, the idea is this:

    Source (dvd, sat, htpc etc) ->
    Hdmi cable ->
    Hdbaset xmitter ->
    Ethernet cat cable ->
    Hdbaset rcvr ->
    Hdmi cable ->
    Tv

    That should still work for your tv assuming you have an available hdmi port. This is basically the same idea as a wireless version, just wired (in that middle section). Wires give you better reliability and isolation from interference, wireless gives you better logistical placement and/or mobility.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 4th Dec 2019 at 01:02.
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  16. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Most HDbaseT stuff is NOT compatible with standard IP switches (in their normal configuration and at normal consumer/prosumer prices). Certainly not while piggybacking on standard data traffic.
    I've read all the user reviews of the HDbaseT version of their product, and it is clear that almost all of the one-star (bad) reviews are from people who thought they could route the signal through their home network. The company makes it quite clear that you must use a dedicated switch for that purpose and that this switch should only handle the traffic from their product.

    As I keep trying to balance all the issues with doing this, I go back and forth between the HDbaseT technology (I didn't know that term until you used it) and doing the same thing over coax. There are a couple of places where I only pulled six-wire telephone and didn't pull Cat5. I pulled RG6 everywhere. Also, my closet punch down panel is really full from all the equipment changes over the past quarter century, and the coax solution doesn't require a switch and its associated wall wart. Yeah, I know that is tiny stuff, but I have issues with heat, with powering during blackouts, etc. My TV provider box (Uverse) is located outside the closet so I can have the HDMI to coax transmitter there (no heat or power issues at that location), and then do the routing (nothing more than a passive splitter for the coax solution) in the jam-packed equipment closet.
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