VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Massachusettts
    Search PM
    Hello Everyone!

    Recently I wanted to increase the volume of an audio track using FFmpeg, first of all, I had to read a guide on how to do this. But at the end of the guide it says the following:
    "Note that the volume filter only adjusts the volume. It does not set the volume"
    This confuses me, because Adjust-Increase-Reduce volume is not the same as Set it?

    I just want the volume changes to be permanent.

    Can someone explain me this please.

    Link to the Guide:
    https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/AudioVolume
    Last edited by Rizoko; 26th Nov 2019 at 09:43.
    Quote Quote  
  2. It adjusts the volume relative to its current volume. For example -filter:a "volume=1.5" makes the volume 1.5x louder. It does not set the volume to an absolute loudness. The latter is what all the discussion of normalization is about.

    For example, say you have three tracks with "loudness" of 25 percent 50 percent and 100 percent. You apply volume=1.5 to each of them. The new tracks will have loudness values of 37.5 percent, 75 percent, and 150 percent. Normalization to 100 percent would result in all three having 100 percent.
    Last edited by jagabo; 26th Nov 2019 at 11:20.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Massachusettts
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    It adjusts the volume relative to its current volume. For example -filter:a "volume=1.5" makes the volume 1.5x louder. It does not set the volume to an absolute loudness. The latter is what all the discussion of normalization is about.

    For example, say you have three tracks with "loudness" of 25 percent 50 percent and 100 percent. You apply volume=1.5 to each of them. The new tracks will have loudness values of 37.5 percent, 75 percent, and 150 percent. Normalization to 100 percent would result in all three having 100 percent.
    It is entirely clear to me now! I appreciate your attention and thank you for taking the time to reply.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads