VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 19 of 19
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Hi, everyone! This is my first post and Iím pretty much a n00b at all things video capture. I hope someone can give me some direction.

    Iím a photographer and I got a night vision video camera for a great price on eBay. It used to be connected to the front of a Cadillac ElDorado.

    However!

    I am stymied trying to capture (or even connect) the video signal. According to my extensive googling the output from the camera has a ďlow signalĒ (yellow wire) and a ďhigh signalĒ (green wire). I also read that the output is NTSC composite but my NTSC composite cable (RG-6 or RG-59 I think) only has one wire so I donít know what to splice where. My extensive googling has not enlightened me re: what ďhighĒ and ďlowĒ signals even are.

    Furthermore, I want to capture as much of the original signal as possible. Maybe some sort of lossless format. In that case, is an NTSC cable even the right choice? My practical reason for wanting a lossless capture is that I want to make still images with as much detail as possible. My impractical reason is that Iím neurotic about that kind of thing.

    Cheers!
    Image Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	AF1A8C56-B1BA-47D2-A8E1-89A444C2856E.jpeg
Views:	30
Size:	224.3 KB
ID:	50952  

    Click image for larger version

Name:	3A351A28-C676-4934-8BFB-D090DA69D99B.jpeg
Views:	14
Size:	224.8 KB
ID:	50953  

    Quote Quote  
  2. Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    does the camera have any SD Card slots ??
    and what is the camera model.
    also what are you wanting to connect the camera to (computer - TV etc )
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member dellsam34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Paris Ca, 92345 Mexico
    Search PM
    The yellow and dark green are most likely composite, Use a RCA yellow cable connect the video high to the center pin, the low to the ring or shield. power up the camera with 12-14V source, connect the black/white to ground and pink to (+), you may need to connect the brown to (+) to simulate the ignition condition.
    Quote Quote  
  4. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    canada
    Search Comp PM
    You will want to connect brown to a +12 v source that turns on when the ignition is turned on such acc.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
    Quote Quote  
  5. You may need balun to as it looks to me like differential video interface. Connecting oscilloscope will provide definite answer but i assume this is not an option.
    Quote Quote  
  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    Pandy is right. Standard composite is usually 1volt peak-to-peak. And only 2 wires (hot & ground).

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 25th Nov 2019 at 20:24.
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member dellsam34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Paris Ca, 92345 Mexico
    Search PM
    Composite NTSC is the dominant standard in automotive entertainment and safety monitoring here in north America, Composite uses its own ground that's why it's called low.

    Here is a snippet from Wiki:

    Cadillac
    First worldwide series production automotive night vision on 2000 Cadillac Deville: Night Vision, however it was discontinued in 2004.[27] This system was developed with Raytheon and worked by using a passive infrared sensor camera mounted behind the vehicle's grille. Infrared radiation is picked up by the sensor, processed by computer and then displayed on the windshield using a head-up display. Information is displayed as a black-and-white image with warmer objects in white, while cooler objects appear black.[28][29][30] Because this system outputs a standard NTSC composite video signal and the used parts are somewhat easy and inexpensive to find, it has become a popular choice for fitting thermal night vision to other vehicles.[31] After a long hiatus, the 2015 flagship Cadillac CT6 was equipped with an improved version of the Enhanced Night Vision, in which the images are displayed and embedded in the instrument panel instead of being displayed as a reflection on the windshield.[32]
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search PM
    "Low" is not always the same thing as ground, especially as regards analog signals (of which composite is one).
    Do NOT take your understanding of the nomenclature at face value: verify using a manual and/or schematics.

    Scott
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member dellsam34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Paris Ca, 92345 Mexico
    Search PM
    Yes low is not always the main ground but it is the ground of whatever load in question, whether it is automotive, consumer electronics or industrial.
    Quote Quote  
  10. Originally Posted by UnderYourSkin View Post
    Iím a photographer and I got a night vision video camera for a great price on eBay. It used to be connected to the front of a Cadillac ElDorado.

    I am stymied trying to capture (or even connect) the video signal.
    Hi there, and oh man I haven't seen one of these cameras in years, this dates from the days of really expensive ($2K) "FLIR" cameras/displays you could get on Cadillacs. That is, I'm assuming it's a genuine Cadillac part and not something somebody rigged up on their Caddy? Anyway I'll assume it's one of the vintage "night vision" cameras that connected to a little "heads-up" display on the dash -- if so, it's basically just an IR camera that puts out a standard NTSC composite signal.

    If that's the one, and it sure looks like it based on your pin out/wiring chart, then hookup is pretty easy: Connect pin/wire A to +12 V power (actually it's 14v but 12v should work fine), pin/wire B is -12 V (your ground wire), pin/wire C is composite ground, and pin/wire D is your composite signal, you don't need E and F for anything unless you're putting this back in your Cadillac.

    If you feed the composite signal into an NTSC composite input on your TV/monitor, you'll then see a black and white IR image on screen, very cool and vintage where the warmer the object in front of the camera, the brighter white it will be. Very basic night vision stuff. But secret trick: You can reverse the composite ground and signal connection (run C to signal and D to ground) and you'll get an inverted IR video, where hot is black and cold is white. I dunno how useful that is but maybe you can have fun with it.

    Oh, and then you just input the NTSC composite video into whatever capture device you've got, other peeps can take it from there. Hope this helps!
    Quote Quote  
  11. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    does the camera have any SD Card slots ??
    and what is the camera model.
    also what are you wanting to connect the camera to (computer - TV etc )
    It does not have an SD card slot - just these wires sticking out! The model number is GM 88890711. I want to connect it to anything at all for now - so I can see if it works. But then I want to capture the best signal I can to make still images for photography and maybe video.
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by ozymango View Post
    Originally Posted by UnderYourSkin View Post
    Iím a photographer and I got a night vision video camera for a great price on eBay. It used to be connected to the front of a Cadillac ElDorado.

    I am stymied trying to capture (or even connect) the video signal.
    Hi there, and oh man I haven't seen one of these cameras in years, this dates from the days of really expensive ($2K) "FLIR" cameras/displays you could get on Cadillacs. That is, I'm assuming it's a genuine Cadillac part and not something somebody rigged up on their Caddy? Anyway I'll assume it's one of the vintage "night vision" cameras that connected to a little "heads-up" display on the dash -- if so, it's basically just an IR camera that puts out a standard NTSC composite signal.

    If that's the one, and it sure looks like it based on your pin out/wiring chart, then hookup is pretty easy: Connect pin/wire A to +12 V power (actually it's 14v but 12v should work fine), pin/wire B is -12 V (your ground wire), pin/wire C is composite ground, and pin/wire D is your composite signal, you don't need E and F for anything unless you're putting this back in your Cadillac.

    If you feed the composite signal into an NTSC composite input on your TV/monitor, you'll then see a black and white IR image on screen, very cool and vintage where the warmer the object in front of the camera, the brighter white it will be. Very basic night vision stuff. But secret trick: You can reverse the composite ground and signal connection (run C to signal and D to ground) and you'll get an inverted IR video, where hot is black and cold is white. I dunno how useful that is but maybe you can have fun with it.

    Oh, and then you just input the NTSC composite video into whatever capture device you've got, other peeps can take it from there. Hope this helps!
    Thatís great information. Thanks! I could buy a connector and stick the wires into it. Theyíre like $25. Would there be an advantage to going that route rather than just splicing the bare wires? The problem would be attaching the male counterparts. Or maybe there is a way? It would be kind of satisfying to set it up with the intended connector. But that might not make sense unless I have a dedicated power/display/capture setup. Just thinking out loud here. I guess I could make a portable power/capture unit.

    Regarding the power, the intended wattage seems to be 14. You said 12w should be fine and I have a 12w adapter. Would the slightly lower wattage affect the cameraís performance or anything?

    For capture, I do have a Hauppauge HD PVR but Iíve never actually used it. And it records in a compressed mpeg format which might not be my best option. I would love any expert guidance or even random ideas about how to capture the maximum amount of data per image frame (I.e. photograph).

    I think Iíll try some splicing and dicing right now and see what happens when I plug it into my tv!
    Quote Quote  
  13. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    you can buy a working night vision cam for $20 on amazon. https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=night+vision+camera&s=price-asc-rank&qid=1574900216&ref=s...price-asc-rank why waste time with that old pos cam? they stopped making that car in '02.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  14. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by pandy View Post
    You may need balun to as it looks to me like differential video interface. Connecting oscilloscope will provide definite answer but i assume this is not an option.
    Thank you! I donít have one. Am I going to break it if I hook up the video feed wrong?
    Quote Quote  
  15. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    you can buy a working night vision cam for $20 on amazon. https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=night+vision+camera&s=price-asc-rank&qid=1574900216&ref=s...price-asc-rank why waste time with that old pos cam? they stopped making that car in '02.
    That link is for an 850nm near infrared camera. The camera Iím working on is for 8000-14000nm (8-14 microns) long wave infrared. Very different animals. Near infrared reflects like visible light. LWIR doesnít. I do have a camera capable of capturing near infrared, and itís cool. But this pos is an actual thermal camera with a Raytheon 320x240 BST sensor. If you find one for cheaper than the $80 I paid hook me up!
    Quote Quote  
  16. Member dellsam34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Paris Ca, 92345 Mexico
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by UnderYourSkin View Post
    Regarding the power, the intended wattage seems to be 14. You said 12w should be fine and I have a 12w adapter. Would the slightly lower wattage affect the cameraís performance or anything?
    It's voltage not wattage, In automotive there no such fixed voltage, the working voltage is from dead battery 12V to fully charged 12.6V, and while the engine is running the alternator puts out about 14V, The camera is designed to work in that voltage interval 12-14V.

    As to hooking up the camera, I already explained it in post #3, just get a yellow RCA cable that you probably have one already and cut one end and connect as I explained it. the same for power with an appropriate power connector.
    Quote Quote  
  17. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    lol - no but new long wave plug and play cams start around 150. and they don't have used 20 year old sensors.... https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-IN-SEALED-BOX-Seek-Thermal-Compact-XR-Imaging-Camera-for-...sAAOSwnhpd01HD
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  18. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Search PM
    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    Originally Posted by UnderYourSkin View Post
    Regarding the power, the intended wattage seems to be 14. You said 12w should be fine and I have a 12w adapter. Would the slightly lower wattage affect the cameraís performance or anything?
    It's voltage not wattage, In automotive there no such fixed voltage, the working voltage is from dead battery 12V to fully charged 12.6V, and while the engine is running the alternator puts out about 14V, The camera is designed to work in that voltage interval 12-14V.

    As to hooking up the camera, I already explained it in post #3, just get a yellow RCA cable that you probably have one already and cut one end and connect as I explained it. the same for power with an appropriate power connector.
    Thanks. So the two video wires are bundled with what I assumed was a ground. Just bare twisted silver-colored wires. The pin-out doesnít mention it. I have seen a wiring diagram but I donít know enough to make sense of it. I connected everything following your advice and didnít seem to get a signal out or any indication it powered up. I didnít connect that mystery silver braided wire and I didnít connect the ignition wire to power though. Iíll try connecting the ignition to power next.
    Quote Quote  
  19. Member dellsam34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Paris Ca, 92345 Mexico
    Search PM
    You may need to connect the ignition wire to the power + as I mentioned and make sure you have power. I don'y know what wires you have I was just going by the pinout in the table you posted, certainly more detailed pictures would help.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads