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  1. Member
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    Hello,

    I OWN a DVD movie and would like to back it up to VHS. It has copy protection (I think Macrovision but not sure). The screen goes light, dark, light, and off and on when played through VCR.

    I want to use my movie on a VHS player where I go and there is no DVD. remove this if I burn it and then try to play the burned copy to VHS? What can I do?


    thanks
    iosman
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  2. The Grex video stabilizer should work.
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  3. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    It is not going to be a cheap solution, you need a video stabilizer or a TBC which none can be cheap nowadays. It is way cheaper to get a hard drive or flash memory media player with analog outputs (or HDMI if your TV has HDMI input) and rip the DVD to computer and copy it to the media player.
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by iosman View Post
    Hello,

    I OWN a DVD movie and would like to back it up to VHS. It has copy protection (I think Macrovision but not sure). The screen goes light, dark, light, and off and on when played through VCR.

    I want to use my movie on a VHS player where I go and there is no DVD. remove this if I burn it and then try to play the burned copy to VHS? What can I do?


    thanks
    iosman
    are you trying to copy from DVD to VHS or VHS to DVD ??
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  5. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    He is very clear on what he wants to do just re read the first post.
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  6. Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    He is very clear on what he wants to do just re read the first post.
    I'm in the same boat as October262: it is actually not clear what he is trying to do. Yes, the title and the post say he is trying to backup a DVD to VHS, but this makes no sense.: why would anyone do such a dumb thing if, as the OP says, he owns the DVD?? Just play the DVD and get on with life.

    The other thing that makes the post extremely confusing is that he claims the DVD has some sort of Macrovision copy protection, something that is found on VHS but, AFAIK, not on DVD.
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  7. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
    I'm in the same boat as October262: it is actually not clear what he is trying to do. Yes, the title and the post say he is trying to backup a DVD to VHS, but this makes no sense.: why would anyone do such a dumb thing if, as the OP says, he owns the DVD?? Just play the DVD and get on with life.

    The other thing that makes the post extremely confusing is that he claims the DVD has some sort of Macrovision copy protection, something that is found on VHS but, AFAIK, not on DVD.
    Obviously you didn't read the entire post he has a reason for that:
    I want to use my movie on a VHS player where I go and there is no DVD
    Also your lack of knowledge makes you confused, DVD has the analog Macrovision protection on the analog outputs just like VHS did.
    Last edited by dellsam34; 11th Nov 2019 at 16:25.
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  8. DVDs have a flag in the video stream that tells the DVD player to add Macrovision's Analog Protection System (APS). APS uses some of the same techniques as Macrovision's Copyguard (CPS) for VHS. All commercial DVD players implement this feature.

    And yes, the best method is to make an APS-free backup of the DVD and record the output of that disc to VHS (assuming you must have VHS).
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  9. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    DVDs have a flag in the video stream that tells the DVD player to add Macrovision's Analog Protection System (APS). APS uses some of the same techniques as Macrovision's Copyguard (CPS) for VHS. All commercial DVD players implement this feature.

    And yes, the best method is to make an APS-free backup of the DVD and record the output of that disc to VHS (assuming you must have VHS).
    Yes, I understand that, but I also understand that most ripping programs remove that flag. What I was referring to above is that since the video is digital, it does not have the timing pulse suppression that is the heart of VHS Macrovision. That was the original "Macrovision."

    So, despite the snark from dellsam34 ("your lack of knowledge makes you confused"), converting to VHS is still a pretty bad idea because there is a much more more reasonable way to be able to play a movie somewhere that doesn't have a DVD player: convert it to a format that will play on a laptop, tablet, or other digital device, and then bring along whatever cables and converter will let it play on the equipment at the remote location.

    Degrading it to VHS, and taking the time to record it to VHS (can't be done faster than real-time), both seem like wrong-headed ideas.

    So, to the OP, consider one of these other options. Also, if you really want to record to VHS, use a ripping program that takes care of the Macrovision flag, and that should solve your problem.
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  10. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    The ripping software programs removes the digital protection from the VOB files, He is recording from an analog output. We all know that recording DVD to VHS degrades the quality and it consumes time, but we are not in the position to tel the OP what to do other than giving suggestions, Some people do things for personal purposes and they have every right to do so whether it makes sense or it doesn't.
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    Back in the 90s I owned a analoge video mixer: Sansui-Video-Processor-VX-99-Pal. All it did was taking the sync of one of the sources and made wipes and fades bewteen source 1, source 2, black or a color. In this mode it cleared the blanking of the signal, precise where the Macrovision block where. No TBC (Timebase corrector) was in this machine. So with this gear I could make a simple copy of a protected VHS (or DVD). But now a serious question: Why copy a DVD to VHS??
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  12. The OP, iosman, is from India. So workarounds that seem more reasonable in our neck of the woods may not carry over as well to his situation. It is entirely possible the remote location he's referring to has a bare-bones old CRT television with an old VCR attached, and he's happy at least that works. Backing up the DVD to a VHS would do just fine for that very specific occasional situation, the generation loss will hardly be noticeable. Bringing a VHS tape to that location and leaving it there will be a lot simpler than fussing with a media player (which the TV might not even have connections for), or dragging a laptop back and forth (here again, the old TV is unlikely to have HDMI input). Probably the best workaround would be to just pick up a very cheap DVD player to keep in that location, but yet again, chances are the old TV does not have composite connections. If we're dealing with an RF-only TV (as seems likely), it VHS backup or nothing.

    Agreed the best way to defeat the MV issue would be using a decrypt-and-rip utility to make a clean backup DVD, then playing from that backup DVD to make a clean VHS. Finding an old analog MV filter or Grex or TBC in India is probably more difficult than simply downloading a utility like dvdfab.
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  13. Mountains of gear vaporeon800's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dellsam34 View Post
    The ripping software programs removes the digital protection from the VOB files, He is recording from an analog output.
    The digital flag is what triggers the DVD player to add copy protection to its analog outputs, as stated by jagabo. Ripping the DVD and playing the rip instead of the original solves the problem.
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  14. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Yes I'm aware of that but the process will be even longer and requires blank DVD's that's why I suggested using a video stabilizer during recording to VHS from the commercial DVD or rip to computer (after removing the protection obviously) and load to a media player.
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