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  1. Member
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    Hi guys I have my Bluray Collection and several movies I like to make a backup just in case, but I dont like to burn on another disc I like to make a MKV file from those disc with MakeMKV, I tried with some movies and the resolution is 1920x1080 of course, but I was thinking what about those MKV that you can find on web? I noticed they have 1920x800 resolution and when I watched the quality is amazing, just for that Im curious whats difference between watch in 1920x1080 and 1920x800 I mean, what is missing on screen? or what I earn? I hope you undestand my English

    Thank you in advance!!
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  2. Originally Posted by BlurayHD View Post
    whats difference between watch in 1920x1080 and 1920x800 I mean, what is missing on screen?
    Assuming the source was a 2.4:1 movie, nothing is missing. The encoder just removed the black bars before encoding. The player or TV will add black bars to the top and bottom of the 1920x800 video to fill the rest of the 1920x1080 screen.
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  3. Your TV or monitor has probably a width / height ratio of 16:9 = 1.778.
    1920x1080 is the standard resolution of Blu-ray, means width/height =1920/1080=1.778=16:9

    Movies come in different width/height ratios called 'movie aspect ratio', some are 16:9=1.778=1920/1080. Such movies will fully fill your TV screen.
    Other movies have an aspect ratio of 2.4:1 = 1920/800. In order to make them blu-ray compliant, black borders of 140 pixels are added to the top and to the bottom of the movie picture, so the picture including the black borders becomes 1920x(800+140+140)=1920x1080 and is blu-ray compliant. A blu-ray player expects a frame size of 1920x1080, otherwise it may reject the disc.

    Your TV and certainly your PC SW player are smarter than your HW-player and accept the 1920x800 picture without the black borders. The TV will add these borders automatically during playback, means you will see the movie on your TV screen with black borders top and bottom.

    Quality wise there is no difference for viewing. It's just a question of the movie's aspect ratio (width to height ratio of the movie picture)

    More see for example here
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_aspect_ratio
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by Sharc View Post
    Your TV or monitor has probably a width / height ratio of 16:9 = 1.778.
    1920x1080 is the standard resolution of Blu-ray, means width/height =1920/1080=1.778=16:9

    Movies come in different width/height ratios called 'movie aspect ratio', some are 16:9=1.778=1920/1080. Such movies will fully fill your TV screen.
    Other movies have an aspect ratio of 2.4:1 = 1920/800. In order to make them blu-ray compliant, black borders of 140 pixels are added to the top and to the bottom of the movie picture, so the picture including the black borders becomes 1920x(800+140+140)=1920x1080 and is blu-ray compliant. A blu-ray player expects a frame size of 1920x1080, otherwise it may reject the disc.

    Your TV and certainly your PC SW player are smarter than your HW-player and accept the 1920x800 picture without the black borders. The TV will add these borders automatically during playback, means you will see the movie on your TV screen with black borders top and bottom.

    Quality wise there is no difference for viewing. It's just a question of the movie's aspect ratio (width to height ratio of the movie picture)

    More see for example here
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_aspect_ratio
    @jagabo and @Sharc thank you for let me clear that, So, the think is, Im currently encode those MKV from the Bluray disc using Handbrake so I can reduce de size but keeping 1920x1080 as the original, one think that confuse me is if I use the MKV from Bluray disc in real full hd (several hours to encode) and what about if I dont use that and I take the MKV from web, the same movie in 1920x800 ? considering I bought the original and I dont wnat to spend several hours for encode, so then I could use those MKV from web, I asking this because de AR that you saying, in terms will be the same AR? all I like to do is have the MKV just like the originial the most as possible but if x800 or x1080 will not affect?

    If you dont understand Ill try to explain doing my best
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  5. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    @jagabo and @Sharc thank you for let me clear that, So, the think is, Im currently encode those MKV from the Bluray disc using Handbrake so I can reduce de size but keeping 1920x1080 as the original, one think that confuse me is if I use the MKV from Bluray disc in real full hd (several hours to encode) and what about if I dont use that and I take the MKV from web, the same movie in 1920x800 ? considering I bought the original and I dont wnat to spend several hours for encode, so then I could use those MKV from web, I asking this because de AR that you saying, in terms will be the same AR? all I like to do is have the MKV just like the originial the most as possible but if x800 or x1080 will not affect?

    If you dont understand Ill try to explain doing my best
    Regardless if you own the disc or not, if you download a copyright title from the web it is illegal - that is the law Internationally. No point discussing the merits or otherwise that's the law.

    You can make a MKV from your own discs and reduce the size a little bit by leaving out those elements you don't need like multiple subtitles, audio tracks or just copying the main title. You could after making the MKV via MakeMKV then reduce the size of that file using Vidcoder rather than having the Blu ray disc in the machine for hours. If you compress any file there are always losses somewhere.
    SONY 75" Full array 200Hz LED TV, Yamaha A1070 amp, Zidoo UHD3000, BeyonWiz PVR V2 (Enigma2 clone), Chromecast, Windows 7 Ultimate, QNAP NAS TS851
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  6. Originally Posted by BlurayHD View Post
    considering I bought the original and I dont wnat to spend several hours for encode, so then I could use those MKV from web
    Technically, that's still a copyright, license, and/or legal violation (depending on which country you are in and who you ask).

    Originally Posted by BlurayHD View Post
    I asking this because de AR that you saying, in terms will be the same AR? all I like to do is have the MKV just like the originial the most as possible but if x800 or x1080 will not affect?
    DVD and Blu-ray only support two aspect ratios: 4:3 and 16:9. Any movie that's not one of those aspect ratios (i.e., almost all of them, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)) will have black borders added to fill out the frame. Here's a frame from 2.35:1 movie in a 16:9 frame as it would appear on a Blu-ray disc. The black borders are part of the video on the disc:

    Image
    [Attachment 50764 - Click to enlarge]


    Bootlegs you find online will typically have the black borders cropped away:

    Image
    [Attachment 50765 - Click to enlarge]


    If you watch those two videos on a 16:9 display the first will be displayed as is. The second will have black borders added back to fill the rest of the 16:9 screen. So they both look the same when viewed on TV.

    Of course, if you don't have a reference you can't be sure whether the cropped video only had black borders cropped away. It's always possible someone took a real 16:9 source and cropped away parts of the frame to make a 2.35:1 video for upload. In that case you would be missing parts of the picture.
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  7. Mr. Computer Geek dannyboy48888's Avatar
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    Another nice side benefit of cropping off black: with 16:10,16:9, and ultra wide monitors the movie will scale to fill it without adding pillars etc all from one file. With borders you may get pillars etc depending on the screen.
    if all else fails read the manual
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