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  1. Hello, I own 1200 DVD 500 BR and 100 UHD.
    Iíd like to rip all my library using DVDFab and rip all entire movies to ISOS on my NAS and watch it through a compatibleís player Iíve already have.

    My PC is too old for that so I want to buid a new set.
    So Iíd like to know what are you recommend ?
    This build will be only to rip my library,no game etc...

    I thought about a i5 coffe lake with 16 or 32Gb and a 1660 GPU but no idea about the UHD reader.

    Itís only for rip, I donít want to read BR or UHD movie with the PC.

    Does Iím wrong or overkill and if itís, all recommandations are welcome.

    How about the internal UHD reader internal and the mb, which model ?

    And with the set I described, how many time it will take to rip a BR or a UHD movie ?

    Thanks for your answer guys
    Last edited by Roosvelt; 27th Oct 2019 at 06:26.
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  2. ISO files are merely decrypted copies of the original discs. It does not take a lot of CPU power to decrypt -- the process is I/O bound, not CPU bound. Unless your current computer is an Apple II it will be sufficient.
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  3. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    ISO files are merely decrypted copies of the original discs. It does not take a lot of CPU power to decrypt -- the process is I/O bound, not CPU bound. Unless your current computer is an Apple II it will be sufficient.
    Thanks for your reply Jagabo. In fact Iíve put the trigger to a new builf because DVD Fab recommends a GPU card like a 1050 on their website.
    And how about the uhd reader ?
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  4. Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Thanks for your reply Jagabo. In fact Iíve put the trigger to a new builf because DVD Fab recommends a GPU card like a 1050 on their website.
    That's because most people are re-enecoding to make the files smaller -- that's what takes a lot of CPU/GPU power.
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  5. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Thanks for your reply Jagabo. In fact Iíve put the trigger to a new builf because DVD Fab recommends a GPU card like a 1050 on their website.
    That's because most people are re-enecoding to make the files smaller -- that's what takes a lot of CPU/GPU power.
    Ok and have you got a recommendation about the uhd reader please ?
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  6. Sorry, I don't know enough about UHD readers to recommend one.
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Thanks for your reply Jagabo. In fact Iíve put the trigger to a new builf because DVD Fab recommends a GPU card like a 1050 on their website.
    That's because most people are re-enecoding to make the files smaller -- that's what takes a lot of CPU/GPU power.
    Ok and have you got a recommendation about the uhd reader please ?
    for your UHD drives, see this - https://www.dvdfab.cn/4k-uhd-drives.htm
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  8. Originally Posted by october262 View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Thanks for your reply Jagabo. In fact Iíve put the trigger to a new builf because DVD Fab recommends a GPU card like a 1050 on their website.
    That's because most people are re-enecoding to make the files smaller -- that's what takes a lot of CPU/GPU power.
    Ok and have you got a recommendation about the uhd reader please ?
    for your UHD drives, see this - https://www.dvdfab.cn/4k-uhd-drives.htm
    Thanks for your reply October262, Iíve already seen the link, in fact I was expecting feedbacks from people using DVDFab and told me which model they own to be sure.

    At least, even if Jagabo told me an Apple II could do that, Iím afraid itíll be very long with my Pentium G645 @2,9Ghz with 2 cores and 2 threads and I was asking myself if thereís not some specifications for the internal reader.

    I mean, will it be plug and play on my old mobo attached through sata or does the mobo will not be compatible because of SGX HDCP 2.2 etc... ?
    Last edited by Roosvelt; 27th Oct 2019 at 10:48.
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    As jagabo stated, ripping (as per it's true meaning, making an exact bit for bit copy of the disc to your hard drive) isn't heavily CPU intensive, though making sure you have your hard drive defragged helps so the read drive doesn't have to wait for the data to be written. Several years ago, I had to rebuild my ~600 disc DVD collection (I accidentally formatted both my original and backup hard drives) and used three DVD drives at once on my old Q6700 quadcore with 8GB RAM. It took ~10 min per disc and with three drives, it was an almost constant flow swapping out the discs every few minutes.

    Which leads to how long it takes to rip a disc. As stated, a DVD takes ~10 min per disc (even on my current I7, 32GB system), a Blu-Ray ~20-30 mins (I use MakeMKV, don't rip to .iso) and while I don't have any UHD discs, I would think it take ~30-40 mins based on up to 66GB of data vs the ~40-45GB on a DL Blu-Ray. Again the limiting factor is how fast the data can be sent from the optical drive.

    Keep in mind that ripping your discs will take time. It took a couple of months to re-rip my DVD collection with 8-10 hours on some days constantly swapping discs on some days. Makes sense since 600 discs x 10 mini per disc = 6000 min / 100 hours. Add another 30-40 hours for renaming and organizing the rips.

    Also, are you planning to play your rips only on your PC? Or are you planning to serve them from you NAS to other devices (e.g. phone, tablet, standalone media player)? Few non-PC players will work with DVD .iso, even fewer (maybe one or two) will playback Blu-Ray .iso (due to the necessity of having a Blu-Ray license for the player) and AFAIK, none for UHD which requires a combination of proper optical drive, CPU and graphics card.

    The workaround is to remux to .mkv or .mp4. No loss in quality (.mkv and .mp4 are containers), but you lose the menus and each video (main movie, extras) will be a separate file.
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  10. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    As jagabo stated, ripping (as per it's true meaning, making an exact bit for bit copy of the disc to your hard drive) isn't heavily CPU intensive, though making sure you have your hard drive defragged helps so the read drive doesn't have to wait for the data to be written. Several years ago, I had to rebuild my ~600 disc DVD collection (I accidentally formatted both my original and backup hard drives) and used three DVD drives at once on my old Q6700 quadcore with 8GB RAM. It took ~10 min per disc and with three drives, it was an almost constant flow swapping out the discs every few minutes.

    Which leads to how long it takes to rip a disc. As stated, a DVD takes ~10 min per disc (even on my current I7, 32GB system), a Blu-Ray ~20-30 mins (I use MakeMKV, don't rip to .iso) and while I don't have any UHD discs, I would think it take ~30-40 mins based on up to 66GB of data vs the ~40-45GB on a DL Blu-Ray. Again the limiting factor is how fast the data can be sent from the optical drive.

    Keep in mind that ripping your discs will take time. It took a couple of months to re-rip my DVD collection with 8-10 hours on some days constantly swapping discs on some days. Makes sense since 600 discs x 10 mini per disc = 6000 min / 100 hours. Add another 30-40 hours for renaming and organizing the rips.

    Also, are you planning to play your rips only on your PC? Or are you planning to serve them from you NAS to other devices (e.g. phone, tablet, standalone media player)? Few non-PC players will work with DVD .iso, even fewer (maybe one or two) will playback Blu-Ray .iso (due to the necessity of having a Blu-Ray license for the player) and AFAIK, none for UHD which requires a combination of proper optical drive, CPU and graphics card.

    The workaround is to remux to .mkv or .mp4. No loss in quality (.mkv and .mp4 are containers), but you lose the menus and each video (main movie, extras) will be a separate file.
    Hi Lingyi, thanks for your answer and your feedback.
    No I will make ISO and stock it to my nas then Iíve a reader attached to my TV who is compatible to read it so no need to transcode from the NAS.
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    Couple of points about my ripping project.

    Two of the DVD drives were internal and the third was external. I tried adding a fourth drive, but it slowed down the rip speed of the other drives, probably due to overwhelming the write speed of my hard drive.

    All discs were Asian and didn't have any copy protection, so I was able to use DVDShrink instead of DVD Decrypter which was slower, so your DVD rip times will probably be longer.
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  12. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Couple of points about my ripping project.

    Two of the DVD drives were internal and the third was external. I tried adding a fourth drive, but it slowed down the rip speed of the other drives, probably due to overwhelming the write speed of my hard drive.

    All discs were Asian and didn't have any copy protection, so I was able to use DVDShrink instead of DVD Decrypter which was slower, so your DVD rip times will probably be longer.
    Ok thanks for your advice Iíll use DVDshrink for the DVD so
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Iíve already seen the link, in fact I was expecting feedbacks from people using DVDFab and told me which model they own to be sure.
    I play original UHD Blu-ray discs using PowerDVD Ultra, so I can't advise you on the best drives for ripping.

    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    At least, even if Jagabo told me an Apple II could do that, Iím afraid itíll be very long with my Pentium G645 @2,9Ghz with 2 cores and 2 threads and I was asking myself if thereís not some specifications for the internal reader.
    Official UHD Blu-ray drives (drives with the UHD Blu-ray logo) from Pioneer won't work for ripping. Some official UHD Blu-ray drives (LG WH16NS60, LG BU40N (internal slim/laptop) LG BU50N (internal slim/laptop)) from LG will work but the latest firmware must be downgraded to an old version. LG and ASUS make some UHD friendly internal drives that can't be used to play UHD Blu-ray with PowerDVD Ultra but can be used for ripping with older firmware installed.

    The websites associated with ripping software can give you more information on recommended "UHD friendly drives" for their software and how to get firmware downgrades for them.

    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    I mean, will it be plug and play on my old mobo attached through sata or does the mobo will not be compatible because of SGX HDCP 2.2 etc... ?
    SGX and HDCP 2.2 don't matter if you are ripping your discs and playing the resulting files. They are only relevant if you want to play the original UHD Blu-ray disc using PowerDVD Ultra.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 27th Oct 2019 at 11:47.
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  14. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Iíve already seen the link, in fact I was expecting feedbacks from people using DVDFab and told me which model they own to be sure.
    I play original UHD Blu-ray discs using PowerDVD Ultra, so I can't advise you on the best drives for ripping.

    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    At least, even if Jagabo told me an Apple II could do that, Iím afraid itíll be very long with my Pentium G645 @2,9Ghz with 2 cores and 2 threads and I was asking myself if thereís not some specifications for the internal reader.
    Official UHD Blu-ray drives (drives with the UHD Blu-ray logo) from Pioneer won't work for ripping. Some official UHD Blu-ray drives (LG WH16NS60, LG BU40N (internal slim/laptop) LG BU50N (internal slim/laptop)) from LG will work but the latest firmware must be downgraded to an old version. LG and ASUS make some UHD friendly drives that can't be used to play UHD Blu-ray with PowerDVD Ultra but can be used for ripping with older firmware installed.

    The websites associated with ripping software can give you more information on recommended "UHD friendly drives" for their software and how to get firmware downgrades for them.

    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    I mean, will it be plug and play on my old mobo attached through sata or does the mobo will not be compatible because of SGX HDCP 2.2 etc... ?
    SGX and HDCP 2.2 don't matter if you are ripping your discs and playing the resulting files. They are only relevant if you want to play the original UHD Blu-ray disc using PowerDVD Ultra.
    Hi usually_quiet thanks for your reply and informations I appreciate.
    Do you think all itís a waste of money to build a new set with Ryzen 5 /7 or i5 coffee lake because of their 8 or 6 cores to improve time to rip ?
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Couple of points about my ripping project.

    Two of the DVD drives were internal and the third was external. I tried adding a fourth drive, but it slowed down the rip speed of the other drives, probably due to overwhelming the write speed of my hard drive.

    All discs were Asian and didn't have any copy protection, so I was able to use DVDShrink instead of DVD Decrypter which was slower, so your DVD rip times will probably be longer.
    Ok thanks for your advice Iíll use DVDshrink for the DVD so
    Note that DVDShrink doesn't remove/bypass copy protection at all. Almost all U.S. and many (most) DVDs and Blu-Rays have copy protection. Even Asian movie DVDs released by U.S. distributors are usually copy protected. Of the thousands of Asian released DVDs and Blu-Rays I've ripped over years, only a handful had copy protection.

    To remove/bypass the copy protection, you'll need DVDFab. Especially for newer releases which often have different protection schemes.
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post

    Hi usually_quiet thanks for your reply and informations I appreciate.
    Do you think all itís a waste of money to build a new set with Ryzen 5 /7 or i5 coffee lake because of their 8 or 6 cores to improve time to rip ?
    I'm not sure if they will shorten ripping time. Reading the data from the disc is likely to be the bottleneck. However, be sure to check the technical requirements for the ripping software that you want to use to make sure that your computer's specs exceed them.

    If you want to watch your UHD rips with your PC, then you will need to either replace it with a PC that has processor graphics capable of decoding HEVC or get a video card for your existing computer which is able to decode HEVC. You will also need a HDMI 2.0a video connection on the PC if you want to connect the PC to a UHD TV.

    If you want to re-encode your rips a newer, more powerful PC will help tremendously.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 27th Oct 2019 at 12:05.
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  17. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post

    Hi usually_quiet thanks for your reply and informations I appreciate.
    Do you think all itís a waste of money to build a new set with Ryzen 5 /7 or i5 coffee lake because of their 8 or 6 cores to improve time to rip ?
    I'm not sure if they will shorten ripping time. Reading the data from the disc is likely to be the bottleneck. However, be sure to check the technical requirements for the ripping software that you want to use to make sure that your computer's specs exceed them.

    If you want to watch your UHD rips with your PC, then you will need to either replace it with a PC that has processor graphics capable of decoding HEVC or get a video card for your existing computer which is able to decode HEVC. If you want to re-encode your rips a newer, more powerful PC will help tremendously.
    On their website, they require 4Gb RAM 200Gb of free hard disk space and an intel cpu kaby lake series and above with a 1050 for the 4K HW acceleration.
    I donít understand why because itís just a copy of the UHD movie to iso file for the DVDFab UHD copy software

    And I donít want to play it through PC just read it to my ISOís file compatible reader in the living room.

    For BR, it requires Core 2 quad and above with
    2Gb of RAM 100Gb free hard disk dpace and a grx 260 or above


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    I just did a rip test on my laptop vs main PC.

    Both took ~15 minutes to rip the movie only (6.2GB) with MakeMKV, with a max rip rip speed of ~6.4x (~8.2MB/s) connected via USB 2.0

    I used an external optical drive, so an internal may be slightly faster, but the limiting factor is still how fast the drive can read/rip the data.

    Hardware specs:

    Laptop: AMD A6-7310 2GHz 4GB RAM
    Desktop: I7 Kaby Lake 7700 4.2GHz 32GB RAM
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    On their website, they require 4Gb RAM 200Gb of free hard disk space and an intel cpu kaby lake series and above with a 1050 for the 4K HW acceleration.
    I donít understand why because itís just a copy of the UHD movie to iso file for the DVDFab UHD copy software
    It has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.

    From DVDFab:
    Due to the giant size of the media contents of a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, converting the entire main movie can literally take around 20 hours, if the hardware configuration of the computer is not on the top-level. But worry not, there is a solution for that. This 4K Ultra Blu-ray ripper software can take advantage of the latest hardware acceleration technologies, therefore to significantly shrink the conversion process down to around 1 hour, even less. For this to happen, the hardware of your PC need an upgrade to include a video card capable of 4K HEVC 10-bit decoding and encoding, such as NVIDIAís GeForce GTX 1050 Series and above, or Intelís Kaby Lake processor series and above.
    [Edit] The quote is from a different product, 4K Ultra Blu-ray ripper, but their UHD copy software can also compress video to save space.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 27th Oct 2019 at 13:56.
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    While ripping a disc is easy today, the complexity of bypassing/removing* the copy protection is incredibly complex. It took several years for CSS to be cracked for DVDs (many of the regulars here probably remember when copying a DVD used to take days or weeks, literally frame by frame). It was much quicker to crack AACS, used on Blu-Ray since it built upon CSS. But AACS 2.0 used on UHD discs took a couple of years, and in the beginning was thought uncrackable.

    I'm not sure if the hardware requirements are the same for playback and ripping UHDs, but it's there because AACS 2.0, is significantly different than CSS and AACS (1.0), for the first time being tied to hardware.

    *Edit: I say "bypassing/removing the copy protection...", because at least with some programs (e.g. DVDDecrypter), it's possible to rip the disc and keep the copy protection.
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  21. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    On their website, they require 4Gb RAM 200Gb of free hard disk space and an intel cpu kaby lake series and above with a 1050 for the 4K HW acceleration.
    I donít understand why because itís just a copy of the UHD movie to iso file for the DVDFab UHD copy software
    It has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.

    From DVDFab:
    Due to the giant size of the media contents of a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, converting the entire main movie can literally take around 20 hours, if the hardware configuration of the computer is not on the top-level. But worry not, there is a solution for that. This 4K Ultra Blu-ray ripper software can take advantage of the latest hardware acceleration technologies, therefore to significantly shrink the conversion process down to around 1 hour, even less. For this to happen, the hardware of your PC need an upgrade to include a video card capable of 4K HEVC 10-bit decoding and encoding, such as NVIDIAís GeForce GTX 1050 Series and above, or Intelís Kaby Lake processor series and above.
    So it means they finally reduce the size when you said :
    ęIt has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.*Ľ

    Itís not what they said when you look at uhd copy and br copy softwares. They said itís the same size as the original
    Image
    [Attachment 50674 - Click to enlarge]
    Last edited by Roosvelt; 27th Oct 2019 at 14:00.
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  22. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    The confusion about the conflicting specs is due to those folks' intermixing of the terms.
    True "ripping" is the transfer of a copy of the data on a disc to a different storage place/medium (usually HDD/SSD, but could be usb flash, sdcard, etc or even NAS/SAN). This can be done in conjunction with or without decryption (though, if decryption is necessary but not included, the material is basically unusable).

    Some refer to MakeMkv and similar tools also as ripping, but those are ripping + rewrapping (remuxing) the material (usually only main movie) into a new container (mkv in the case of the above tool).

    The ripping that others - MANY others who are not experienced - may be talking about is ripping PLUS re-encoding (and likely also re-wrapping).

    The first 2 forms require VERY LITTLE in the way of cpu capability, while the last one requires VERY MUCH (the more, the better).

    Scott
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    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post

    Some refer to MakeMkv and similar tools also as ripping, but those are ripping + rewrapping (remuxing) the material (usually only main movie) into a new container (mkv in the case of the above tool).
    Thank you for correcting/reminding me about using 'ripping' incorrectly in reference to MakeMKV. *Smacks own hand. Bad lingyi, bad!*
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    On their website, they require 4Gb RAM 200Gb of free hard disk space and an intel cpu kaby lake series and above with a 1050 for the 4K HW acceleration.
    I donít understand why because itís just a copy of the UHD movie to iso file for the DVDFab UHD copy software
    It has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.

    From DVDFab:
    Due to the giant size of the media contents of a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, converting the entire main movie can literally take around 20 hours, if the hardware configuration of the computer is not on the top-level. But worry not, there is a solution for that. This 4K Ultra Blu-ray ripper software can take advantage of the latest hardware acceleration technologies, therefore to significantly shrink the conversion process down to around 1 hour, even less. For this to happen, the hardware of your PC need an upgrade to include a video card capable of 4K HEVC 10-bit decoding and encoding, such as NVIDIAís GeForce GTX 1050 Series and above, or Intelís Kaby Lake processor series and above.
    So it means they finally reduce the size when you said :
    ęIt has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.*Ľ

    Itís not what they said when you look at uhd copy and br copy softwares. They said itís the same size as the original
    Image
    [Attachment 50674 - Click to enlarge]
    Your attachment also mentions saving the full-size rips as "compressed ISO files" and burning 4K movies to "blank BD50/25 discs", which indicates re-encoding might occur. If I remember correctly, pressed UHD Blu-ray discs are mostly 66GB capacity, but 100GB capacity discs are allowed by the spec. The ISO for such UHD Blu-ray movies won't fit on BD-R DL (BD50) discs, let alone BD-R (BD25) discs without compression of some type.
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  25. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    On their website, they require 4Gb RAM 200Gb of free hard disk space and an intel cpu kaby lake series and above with a 1050 for the 4K HW acceleration.
    I donít understand why because itís just a copy of the UHD movie to iso file for the DVDFab UHD copy software
    It has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.

    From DVDFab:
    Due to the giant size of the media contents of a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, converting the entire main movie can literally take around 20 hours, if the hardware configuration of the computer is not on the top-level. But worry not, there is a solution for that. This 4K Ultra Blu-ray ripper software can take advantage of the latest hardware acceleration technologies, therefore to significantly shrink the conversion process down to around 1 hour, even less. For this to happen, the hardware of your PC need an upgrade to include a video card capable of 4K HEVC 10-bit decoding and encoding, such as NVIDIAís GeForce GTX 1050 Series and above, or Intelís Kaby Lake processor series and above.
    So it means they finally reduce the size when you said :
    ęIt has to do with reducing the amount of time required for re-encoding the movie to a smaller size to conserve HDD storage space or burn to BD-R DL or BDR-XL media.*Ľ

    Itís not what they said when you look at uhd copy and br copy softwares. They said itís the same size as the original
    Image
    [Attachment 50674 - Click to enlarge]
    Your attachment also mentions saving the full-size rips as "compressed ISO files" and burning 4K movies to "blank BD50/25 discs", which indicates re-encoding might occur. If I remember correctly, pressed UHD Blu-ray discs are mostly 66GB capacity, but 100GB capacity discs are allowed by the spec. The ISO for such UHD Blu-ray movies won't fit on BD-R DL (BD50) discs, let alone BD-R (BD25) discs without compression of some type.
    Youíre right Usually_quiet but in my case, to make an ISO file of the entire movie, couldnít request high end cpu or gpu, no ?

    In theirs screenshots, we can see we have multiple options and one is copy then full disc who will produce an ISO file as same as the DVD,BR,UHD.

    Last edited by Roosvelt; 27th Oct 2019 at 15:12.
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    DVDFab talks about their software and ripping UHD discs: https://www.dvdfab.cn/resource/4k-media/rip-4k-blu-ray

    Note this paragraph. Emphasis mine.

    "Another great feature of this 4K Blu-ray ripping software is its ability to get the job done a lot faster than you would expect. 4K UHD Blu-ray discs are generally over 50GB in size and because of that, it can take many hours to convert such a movie using most pieces of software. However, DVDFab UHD Ripper uses cutting-edge hardware acceleration technology that can reduce the waiting time to only about an hour or so. That said, you do need a pretty decent system if you want to rip a 4K Blu-ray disc in such a short amount of time. Ideally, your system should include at least an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 series and an Intel Kaby Lake CPU or AMD equivalent to get the best conversion speeds.

    Edit: Bottom line is your system is your system (as you stated) is old and doing an upgrade is probably a good idea if not for ripping, but general use. I upgraded from my old Q6700 rig a couple years ago and while I don't do anything CPU intensive, it's just overall quicker at everything. A few seconds here, a few seconds there adds up during the days and weeks. Plus it's nice to know if something slows down, it's probably a software, not hardware issue.
    Last edited by lingyi; 27th Oct 2019 at 15:39.
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  27. Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    DVDFab talks about their software and ripping UHD discs: https://www.dvdfab.cn/resource/4k-media/rip-4k-blu-ray

    Note this paragraph. Emphasis mine.

    "Another great feature of this 4K Blu-ray ripping software is its ability to get the job done a lot faster than you would expect. 4K UHD Blu-ray discs are generally over 50GB in size and because of that, it can take many hours to convert such a movie using most pieces of software. However, DVDFab UHD Ripper uses cutting-edge hardware acceleration technology that can reduce the waiting time to only about an hour or so. That said, you do need a pretty decent system if you want to rip a 4K Blu-ray disc in such a short amount of time. Ideally, your system should include at least an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 series and an Intel Kaby Lake CPU or AMD equivalent to get the best conversion speeds.

    Edit: Bottom line is your system is your system (as you stated) is old and doing an upgrade is probably a good idea if not for ripping, but general use. I upgraded from my old Q6700 rig a couple years ago and while I don't do anything CPU intensive, it's just overall quicker at everything. A few seconds here, a few seconds there adds up during the days and weeks. Plus it's nice to know if something slows down, it's probably a software, not hardware issue.
    Thanks a lot for this sharing Lingyi.

    First of all Iíll buy an internal uhd reader and see how it will be with my poor G645

    If itís too long or wonít work, Iíll upgrade my setup and why not take advantage of Ryzen while they have 8 cores vs 6 for Intel.

    The first thing to do is to find the uhd internal reader and maybe itíll be the harder because Iíve seen the readerís list on DVDFabís website, most of them are no more available.
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  28. Member
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    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Youíre right Usually_quiet but in my case, to make an ISO file of the entire movie, couldnít request high end cpu or gpu, no ?

    In theirs screenshots, we can see we have multiple options and one is copy then full disc who will produce an ISO file as same as the DVD,BR,UHD.
    I was merely explaining why they mention a newer CPU and specific NVIDIA cards in the technical requirements for the software. You might well be able to get by with your existing PC if you don't intend to re-encode/compress anything.

    The downside is that you'll need more HDD capacity to store it all. Some people don't mind paying extra for more hard drives, while others resist that idea. Depending on the playback device, ISO backups may not be the best choice. Not many stand-alone playback devices or player software can fully utilize UHD Blu-ray menus or Blu-ray menus
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
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  29. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by Roosvelt View Post
    Youíre right Usually_quiet but in my case, to make an ISO file of the entire movie, couldnít request high end cpu or gpu, no ?

    In theirs screenshots, we can see we have multiple options and one is copy then full disc who will produce an ISO file as same as the DVD,BR,UHD.
    I was merely explaining why they mention a newer CPU and specific NVIDIA cards in the technical requirements for the software. You might well be able to get by with your existing PC if you don't intend to re-encode/compress anything.

    The downside is that you'll need more HDD capacity to store it all. Some people don't mind paying extra for more hard drives, while others resist that idea. Depending on the playback device, ISO backups may not be the best choice. Not many stand-alone playback devices or player software can fully utilize UHD Blu-ray menus or Blu-ray menus
    No problem for that Usually_quiet, Iíve a NAS with 48 To

    For the ISO backups, Iíve already donwloaded 2/3 full BR movies and Iíve been able to play it smoothly without any lag with my player software.

    As I said before, the harder thing will be to find an internal UHD reader compatible and listed on DVDFabís website.
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  30. Member
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    DVDFab UHD forum here: https://forum.dvdfab.cn/forum/uhd-copy-ripper/page4. Probably better to get the most up to date info there. The DVDFab staff does post here every so often, but it's mostly just to promote new programs and specials.

    Speaking of specials. If you can wait, they may have a better deal than the Halloween special they have now on Black Friday.
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