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  1. Member
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    I'm getting fiber internet installed to my home on Monday. Want to upgrade my old N600 router to something more current.
    If I hook up a switch to a 4 port router, are the connections to that switch going to suffer from any loss of speed? Versus getting a router with more ports on it?
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  2. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    4 lan port routers are pretty much the standard. there are some high priced 8 lan port gaming routers that are pretty nice. a switch doesn't slow down the throughput, it just directs the traffic. the only caveat can be some switches default to the lowest speed of the devices connected to them. so if you had 3 - 1gb and 1 - 100mb things connected, the switch might only operate at 100mbs for all devices. and make sure all cable are up to or over the needed rating for the speed you want.
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  3. Member
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    You can daisy chain switches without any loss. Easier to run a single cable to another room and install another switch there, than having to run 2-4 cables.
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  4. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    I currently have 2 separate Gbit switches and 3 100Mbit routers all daisy chained together (plus a separate modem), no loss in Gbit speed for those connected to the Gbit switches and 100Mbit for those connected to the 100Mbit routers. Around 1ms ping from one end of the network and back again. On the Gbit switch box, it says it has 2Gbit of internal total bandwidth.
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  5. Member
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    "the only caveat can be some switches default to the lowest speed of the devices connected to them."

    Is that related to some spec that would be listed? Or is that something you can't know until you plug everything in and test? IOW, what would I be looking for to avoid such an issue as you describe?

    Thanks for the input, it sounds like 4 port plus a switch is the way to go
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  6. Usual router is made from 2 port router and few port switch connected to router (and usually there is no physical separation between so called WAN router port and LAN router/switch ports - separation is provided trough internal VLAN). As You didn't specified clearly anything except cable connectivity i assume you are not interested in WiFi (WLAN). Soon 802.11ax shall be fully standardised - it may be wise to at least consider buying 802.11ax capable router as futureproof... for example something like Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX11000 (one of few examples)
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  7. Member
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    Wow that all went right over my head. Yes, I need it to be wifi capable too, not just wired connections.
    I currently have a cable connection to the internet, but my city is installing fiber to the home, it's there already, they're coming on monday to finish the installation.
    I'll probably get the 1Gb service. My current router is very old N technology. So I want to upgrade, but I need more than 4 ports as the house is wired for ethernet.

    So what I was asking was about the Switch. Is there some spec I should look for to avoid that issue about the slowest connected device?

    I don't know anything about the AX, as I think AC is still the current standard right?
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  8. Member Krispy Kritter's Avatar
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    Just for clarity, assuming you are wanting to connect a 4 port switch to the router to gain additional LAN ports (and all ports are the same speed). The devices connected to the router will have full speed connectivity to the WAN (ie: internet). The devices connected to the switch will have full speed connectivity to each other (ie: all devices connected to the switch), but they will share the port speed of the upload port (ie: connection from switch to router). It will function just fine, just plan connectivity accordingly so that any devices that require full speed internet access are connected directly to the router.
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  9. Member
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    I understand what you're saying and that's good information! So I'd probably want to connect my VoIP box, and my home alarm hub thing to the switch instead of to the router because they use far less bandwidth then the computer, or TV for example. Thanks for the tip!
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  10. Originally Posted by sdsumike619 View Post
    Wow that all went right over my head. Yes, I need it to be wifi capable too, not just wired connections.
    I currently have a cable connection to the internet, but my city is installing fiber to the home, it's there already, they're coming on monday to finish the installation.
    I'll probably get the 1Gb service. My current router is very old N technology. So I want to upgrade, but I need more than 4 ports as the house is wired for ethernet.

    So what I was asking was about the Switch. Is there some spec I should look for to avoid that issue about the slowest connected device?

    I don't know anything about the AX, as I think AC is still the current standard right?
    AX should be ready soon, similar to N where first devices was build around draft N standard yet most of them works fine with N devices even today.
    AX is nice as they addressed 2.4GHz problems and improved compatibility/interoperability with N.
    I would at least analyse AX as option - or better i would wait a bit - few month - half year - hope AX devices soon will be less expensive (mentioned Asus is quite pricey) - hope that decent AX router soon will be around 150 - 175$.

    As engineer i'm quite sceptical on wireless - prefer cable or fiber optic but seem this is very first time where wireless may offer same or better speed than Ethernet (1Gbps and 2.5Gbps) at comparable or lower cost... (3 years ago i would never wrote like this, technology changing and as such i must wrote that over 1Gbps should be feasible over wireless in typical condo).

    https://www.networkworld.com/article/3258807/what-is-802-11ax-wi-fi-and-what-will-it-m...-802-11ac.html
    https://www.techrepublic.com/article/wi-fi-6-802-11ax-a-cheat-sheet/

    Originally Posted by sdsumike619 View Post
    I understand what you're saying and that's good information! So I'd probably want to connect my VoIP box, and my home alarm hub thing to the switch instead of to the router because they use far less bandwidth then the computer, or TV for example. Thanks for the tip!
    Another big topic - personally i would choose come switch with VLAN and management function. Good router can be build around Rpi4 - with additional security due physical WAN/LAN separation, combined with modern manageable switch you can create reliable and secure home network.
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  11. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    I use a 16 position managed gigabit switch off my incoming DSL router. That runs the servers and PCs within the room.
    The DSL router just has the printer, and a AC router for WiFi plugged into it.

    The rest of the LAN system has three 8 position unmanaged gigabit switches to communicate with the computers in rest the house.

    The LAN system itself runs at gigabit speed. The router to internet connection is the slow part of it. Not many high speed internet options around here.
    It's $60US a month for 11Mpps DL with 0.8Mpps upload.

    My LAN system will crash occasionally as when the router drops the DSL/Internet signal, then the 16 position switch looses it's address.
    It goes from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.0.1 and I lose my WiFi AC.
    This only happens when their system drops out. No other problems with my switches and CAT6 wiring.
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  12. Member
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    Ahhh you guys are getting too technical for me now. I'll go with the 4 port router and a switch, do what I always do, get the best rated one on Amazon and hope for the best
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