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  1. Hello,

    unfortunately some versions of movies are not available in my country and I want to create my own rip.

    For example I have two BluRays:

    - DC: 2:0:0 h (audio: english)
    - theatrical: 1:30:0 h (audio: my language)

    Now I take the video stream from the DC and the audio stream from the theatrical version (and fill the gaps with the DC audio stream) and mux them together.

    It should look like this:
    Click image for larger version

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    Is there a way to identify identical frames?
    I need to compare both versions and when the frames are different I need to take the DC audio until the frames are identical again.
    I hope I'm right with my approach.

    (I have Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 - can I do this with that program?)

    Best,
    Felix
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  2. Play the film in its original language and create or download subtitles. Dubbed audio is for children that can't read.
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  3. Okay, thank you for your help.

    Maybe an answer more on topic?
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  4. Do these two versions even have the same framerates? Except for the Director's Cut additional scenes, are they otherwise exactly the same? You could put both films in your NLE and scroll forward until coming to the change, extract the audio from your own language version for that section, replace it and go on from there.

    It's still a dumb idea, though, and will take an ungodly amount of time.
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  5. Yes, they‘re exactly the same.

    Okay, that sounds like it will be a lot of handiwork ...

    No way to compare the two movies frame by frame and show the difference?

    I‘m searching for something like this:

    Left view DC
    Right view theatrical

    Both movies start ...
    At 10th minute left view differs from right.
    Program keeps playing left view and stops right view. It permanentaly scans left view if the current frame matches right view.
    If so right view starts and both views are playing. And so on ...
    Last edited by FLX90; 15th Jul 2019 at 16:49.
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    To accurately compare 2 frames AUTOMATICALLY, you'd have to start with the assumption that the videos' properties are exactly the same (EXCEPT the total # of overall frames, aka Duration). However, given that your language is different than english, there is a higher probability that the video properties aren't the same and that you would have to massage one video stream's contents to get it in line with another. Doing so will make the modified frame be a "guesstimate" of the other, so unless your comparison script had a much lower threshold for MATCH requirements, they wouldn't match. If framerate is different, that is even worse, because rarely could you do something like ITVC to restore to similar framerates, and anything else would have BLENDED or DUPE/SKIPPED Frames which would make matching a near impossibility.

    Assuming you know FOR SURE that the clips are the same other than extra DC frames (how do you KNOW?), and Assuming framerates are compatible (24 vs. 24, or 24 vs. 23.976)...
    To manually do it:
    1. Load BOTH V+A for DC, and V+A for theatrical keeping each set ganged
    2. Interpret both framerates to be the same (matching DC, hopefully), so they will line up in the timeline without skips
    3. Overlay one on top of the other with a 50% opacity so you can see both at the same time (or alternately, do a split-screen, but this may miss somethings)
    4. Run through the movie enough times to find the edit points (marking ins & outs as you go, backing up & redoing if need be)
    5. Keep sliding the remaining edited theatrical version later until it matches up with the DC version again, do this over & over along w/ #4. Now you should have a DC length with DC stream unbroken, and a theatrical stream broken at the DC clip sections
    6. Ungang the V from the A in both streams
    7. At each gap point do the opposite of a mark in/mark out (mark out mark in), and then go back & delete (without sliding) the DC audio clips, so that what remains is a checkerboard between the DC audio for the DC sections and the theatrical audio for the theatrical sections.
    8. Create a new audio track and copy All the DC audio clips into it.
    9. Copy All the Theatrical audio clips into the gaps in the new audio track. Then do some nice crossfades (will need to use mainly the DC to transition) to make it seamless. You will also need to check on relative levels here so there isn't jumping/pumping of levels between clips (helps if you copy both clip & level info). Alternately, you can skip 8&9 and just adjust the original tracks' levels and RENDER a new track via playback (but again, mind the crossfades).
    10. Export ONLY the new audio track (muting everything else).
    11. Mux the original DC video stream with the new exported track audio stream.
    DONE.

    Yes, it will take a LOOONNNGGGG time. To be expected.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 15th Jul 2019 at 17:51.
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  7. Great.
    Thank you for the instruction.
    I didn‘t test it so far.

    I will come back when I‘ve finished my first rip.
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  8. Okay, now I have my first questions/problem.

    Unfortunately I only have a DVD from the theatrical version of an other movie.
    The DC is Blu-ray.

    Now I have some questions:

    1. DVD is PAL 25 fps. So I need to get it to 24000/1001 fps.
    I thought I only have to mux it with new frame rate, so I did with mkvtoolnix.
    Unfortunately Premiere Pro doesn't like the MPEG2-Codec.
    So I transcoded my 25-->23,976 mux with x264. (a)
    I also did with the original 25 fps rip. (b)
    x264-r2935-545de2f.exe --fps 24000/1001 --force-cfr --bitrate 5403 --preset veryslow --tune film --bluray-compat --vbv-maxrate 40000 --vbv-bufsize 30000 --level 4.1 --keyint 24 --open-gop --slices 4 --colorprim "bt709" --transfer "bt709" --colormatrix "bt709" --sar 1:1 -o 24fps 25fps
    (I used a blu-ray command, didn't think much about it)
    Now they both (a & b) have the same length (both a bit longer than the original).
    But the two transcodes are not bit identical.
    Why aren't they exactly the same?


    2. Now I had to adapt my audio.
    I did it with the following command(s):
    ffmpeg.exe -i input.flac -filter:a "atempo=0.960086627926381" output_atempo.flac
    ffmpeg.exe -i input.flac -filter:a "asetrate=48000*0.960086627926381,aresample=48 000" output_asetrate.flac
    Both have the same length.
    But what is the difference?
    And was it a lossy convert or lossless?

    3. No question, but a problem:
    After I loaded the x264 transcode into the premiere pro project and put both (BD & DVD stream) overlaying on the sequenz. I cannot play the video, only extreme laggy.
    I have a permanet ssd read access on the x264 transcode video with 170 MB/s, everytime I'm trying to play the video. When I pause it, the read access stops after some seconds.
    (Frame rate of both videos are correctly interpreted (interpret footage))
    The problem is the same when I only added the x264 transcode to my project and try to play it (with the BD ripped video stream I don't have any playback problems).
    MediaInfo:
    Code:
    General
    Complete name                            : C:\video_cut_24fps2.264
    Format                                   : AVC
    Format/Info                              : Advanced Video Codec
    File size                                : 3.32 GiB
    Overall bit rate mode                    : Variable
    Writing library                          : x264 core 157 r2935 545de2f
    Encoding settings                        : cabac=1 / ref=6 / deblock=1:-1:-1 / analyse=0x3:0x133 / me=umh / subme=10 / psy=1 / psy_rd=1.00:0.15 / mixed_ref=1 / me_range=24 / chroma_me=1 / trellis=2 / 8x8dct=1 / cqm=0 / deadzone=21,11 / fast_pskip=1 / chroma_qp_offset=-3 / threads=6 / lookahead_threads=1 / sliced_threads=0 / slices=4 / nr=0 / decimate=1 / interlaced=tff / bluray_compat=1 / constrained_intra=0 / bframes=3 / b_pyramid=1 / b_adapt=2 / b_bias=0 / direct=3 / weightb=1 / open_gop=1 / weightp=0 / keyint=24 / keyint_min=1 / scenecut=40 / intra_refresh=0 / rc_lookahead=24 / rc=abr / mbtree=1 / bitrate=5403 / ratetol=1.0 / qcomp=0.60 / qpmin=0 / qpmax=69 / qpstep=4 / vbv_maxrate=40000 / vbv_bufsize=30000 / nal_hrd=vbr / filler=0 / ip_ratio=1.40 / aq=1:1.00
    
    Video
    Format                                   : AVC
    Format/Info                              : Advanced Video Codec
    Format profile                           : High@L4.1
    Format settings                          : CABAC / 5 Ref Frames
    Format settings, CABAC                   : Yes
    Format settings, RefFrames               : 5 frames
    Bit rate mode                            : Variable
    Bit rate                                 : 5 403 kb/s
    Maximum bit rate                         : 40.0 Mb/s
    Width                                    : 720 pixels
    Height                                   : 576 pixels
    Display aspect ratio                     : 5:4
    Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
    Color space                              : YUV
    Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
    Bit depth                                : 8 bits
    Scan type                                : MBAFF
    Scan type, store method                  : Interleaved fields
    Scan order                               : Top Field First
    Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.543
    Writing library                          : x264 core 157 r2935 545de2f
    Encoding settings                        : cabac=1 / ref=6 / deblock=1:-1:-1 / analyse=0x3:0x133 / me=umh / subme=10 / psy=1 / psy_rd=1.00:0.15 / mixed_ref=1 / me_range=24 / chroma_me=1 / trellis=2 / 8x8dct=1 / cqm=0 / deadzone=21,11 / fast_pskip=1 / chroma_qp_offset=-3 / threads=6 / lookahead_threads=1 / sliced_threads=0 / slices=4 / nr=0 / decimate=1 / interlaced=tff / bluray_compat=1 / constrained_intra=0 / bframes=3 / b_pyramid=1 / b_adapt=2 / b_bias=0 / direct=3 / weightb=1 / open_gop=1 / weightp=0 / keyint=24 / keyint_min=1 / scenecut=40 / intra_refresh=0 / rc_lookahead=24 / rc=abr / mbtree=1 / bitrate=5403 / ratetol=1.0 / qcomp=0.60 / qpmin=0 / qpmax=69 / qpstep=4 / vbv_maxrate=40000 / vbv_bufsize=30000 / nal_hrd=vbr / filler=0 / ip_ratio=1.40 / aq=1:1.00
    Color range                              : Limited
    Color primaries                          : BT.709
    Transfer characteristics                 : BT.709
    Matrix coefficients                      : BT.709
    Last edited by FLX90; 24th Jul 2019 at 14:01.
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  9. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Do these two versions even have the same framerates?
    Originally Posted by FLX90 View Post
    Yes, they‘re exactly the same.
    Originally Posted by FLX90 View Post
    1. DVD is PAL 25 fps. So I need to get it to 24000/1001 fps.
    So, apparently they're not 'exactly the same'. If you can't even determine something as basic as framerates, maybe you're not ready for this project. It's difficult enough even for someone that knows what he's doing. All the reencoding is just degrading the quality of your sources. And Premiere Pro is probably the wrong program to use for this.
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  10. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    So, apparently they're not 'exactly the same'. If you can't even determine something as basic as framerates, maybe you're not ready for this project. It's difficult enough even for someone that knows what he's doing. All the reencoding is just degrading the quality of your sources. And Premiere Pro is probably the wrong program to use for this.
    First: Don't know what reencodes you're talking about. Won't use the transcoded video. That is the point of the whole project ...
    Second: project from first post is finished. Now problem is a different ... NOW frame rate is really not the same and I developed a workaround.

    Why are you answering when you don't want to help?
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  11. Originally Posted by FLX90 View Post
    First: Don't know what reencodes you're talking about.
    Originally Posted by FLX90 View Post
    So I transcoded my 25-->23,976 mux with x264.
    That one.
    Second: project from first post is finished.
    I didn't notice that. So, were you able to do as you wanted - add pieces of the audio from one to the other version.

    Goodbye and good luck.
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