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  1. So, I do a lot of green water diving. (Basically in lakes instead of oceans) and I record all my dives with an inexpensive action camera. The quality is really awesome for the price. The issue is (And I am sure it would be the same issue with a more expensive one, save for those specifically built for diving) is the video is very, well, green.
    I have tried a magenta filter, with little success. So I am looking for a software editing solution. When I put a still frame in photoshop and auto correct color and tone, they come out pretty nice. So i am looking for an "Autocorrect" solutions for video. Suggestions?
    I have provided a sample of what i am up against, so you can take a look.
    Image Attached Files
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  2. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Davinci Resolve with it being best at color grading. And it's free.
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  3. There is no magic one-step solution. If you correct the green for your clip near the middle, it turns very blue towards the end. Resolve, as KarMa mentioned, is a great tool and your clip is not difficult -- thought it will require some keyframing to stay consistent.
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  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    i wouldn't try to change green to blue, then any thing white will be red. i'd try to soften it a bit and bring out more detail and contrast like this.

    Image
    [Attachment 49526 - Click to enlarge]



    vs.


    original


    Image
    [Attachment 49527 - Click to enlarge]
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  5. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Ok, so you may not have MUCH success with stuff previously recorded, but what you could try doing in the future is take a Munsel chipchart (aka color swatch reference marker board) with you on your dive. At the beginning of each shot, or each location, or each depth segment, you shoot the chart in front of you using available light (if you get a chart that isn't waterproof, stick it inside waterproof ziplocks). Then in post, you white-balance against that lit reference.
    Now, some newly-recorded clips of a reference chart, with those same lighting conditions, and using the same camera, with the same settings, might be workable as retroactive references for older material. One can't be sure until it's tried.

    Also, yes you DO need to use a color grading tool that has both primary & secondary color correction capabilities (Resolve, AE, etc) to avoid color interaction side effects.

    Understand, of course, that underwater shots are some of the most difficult to color correct properly, especially with differing depths/distances in a shot (light falloff, blueshift/hazebuildup, etc).

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 9th Jul 2019 at 01:24.
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  6. And, if it has one, use the camera's white balance feature before shooting. Calibrate it in situ. This is generally done by pointing the camera at something white and calibrating. As Cornucopia said, color shift may vary depending on distance. So calibrate at the distance you care most about.

    Regarding the video sample: there's no way of knowing what the colors are supposed to be. So there's no way of correcting. I usually don't care for automated white balance but here's what AviSynth's ColorYUV(autowhite=true) delivered:

    Image
    [Attachment 49531 - Click to enlarge]
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