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  1. Member
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    I'm downmixing a DTS-MA file to a FLAC file and no matter what settings I use it keeps changing the bit depth of the output file from 24-bits to 16-bits. I'd like for it to remain 24-bits. Here's the log information:

    eac3to v3.34
    command line: "C:\Users\User\Downloads\Software\Miscellaneous\In stallers\eAC3to\eac3to334-UsEac3to129\eac3to.exe" "C:\Users\User\Videos\Projects\MKV Tools\Output\01 - James Bond - Title Sequences\20 - Tomorrow Never Dies\03 - Audio\01 - Original\01 - DTS\20 - Tomorrow Never Dies - Title Sequence (04).dts" "C:\Users\User\Music\Projects\eAC3to\20 - Tomorrow Never Dies - Title Sequence (04).dts_.flac" -progressnumbers -log="C:\Users\User\Downloads\Software\Miscellaneou s\Installers\eAC3to\eac3to334-UsEac3to129\UsEac3To.log"
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    DTS Master Audio, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 48kHz
    (core: DTS, 5.1 channels, 1509kbps, 48kHz)
    Decoding with libDcaDec DTS Decoder...
    libDcaDec reported the warning "XLL output not lossless". <WARNING>
    Encoding FLAC with libFlac...
    Creating file "C:\Users\User\Music\Projects\eAC3to\20 - Tomorrow Never Dies - Title Sequence (04).dts_.flac"...
    The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Superfluous zero bytes detected, will be stripped in 2nd pass.
    Starting 2nd pass...
    Decoding FLAC...
    Reducing depth from 24 to 16 bits...
    Encoding FLAC with libFlac...
    Creating file "C:\Users\User\Music\Projects\eAC3to\20 - Tomorrow Never Dies - Title Sequence (04).dts_.flac"...
    The processed audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    eac3to processing took 27 seconds.
    Done.
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  2. The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Why would you want to convert 16 bits to 24 bits?
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  3. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Why would you want to convert 16 bits to 24 bits?
    DTS Master Audio, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 48kHz
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Why would you want to convert 16 bits to 24 bits?
    I don't. Look at the log file. It says:

    "DTS Master Audio, 5.1 channels, 24 bits, 48kHz" and "Reducing depth from 24 to 16 bits..."

    I'm not converting from 16 bits to 24 bits. If it is 16 bits, then can you can tell me why it's saying it's 24 bits, then 16 bits, then 24 bits again?
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  5. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    something is not identifying the original correctly it looks like.
    The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Superfluous zero bytes detected, will be stripped in 2nd pass.
    48khz is normally 16 bit as outputted.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  6. Member
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    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    something is not identifying the original correctly it looks like.
    The original audio track has a constant bit depth of 16 bits.
    Superfluous zero bytes detected, will be stripped in 2nd pass.
    48khz is normally 16 bit as outputted.
    I think DTS-HD Master Audio actually has a bit depth of 24 at 48 kHz by default.
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  7. Dinosaur Supervisor KarMa's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Dabuss55 View Post
    I think DTS-HD Master Audio actually has a bit depth of 24 at 48 kHz by default.
    Apparently the US Blu-ray DTS versions use 24-bit at 48khz.
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  8. The file is encoded at 24 bits. But 8 of the bits are zeroes. I.e. the file looks something like this:
    Code:
    10101111001101110101101100000000
    Since the lower bits are ALL zeroes FOR THE WHOLE FILE it is actually 16 bits. eac3to can't detect it upfront, only after scanning the complete file in the first pass.
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  9. Member
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    The file is encoded at 24 bits. But 8 of the bits are zeroes. I.e. the file looks something like this:
    Code:
    10101111001101110101101100000000
    Since the lower bits are ALL zeroes FOR THE WHOLE FILE it is actually 16 bits. eac3to can't detect it upfront, only after scanning the complete file in the first pass.
    Is there a reason why? Like, did it come that way on the Blu-ray or was it inadvertently/intentionally encoded that way some along the way somehow?
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  10. Well, you did rip this right from the Blu-Ray, didn't you? So it's like this on it.

    Why they did this I don't know. My guesses it's one/some/all of:
    1. authoring house didn't know any better
    2. authoring house missed this detail
    3. authoring house/studio wanted better numbers for better advertising (MORE = BETTER, RIGHT? 2048 bits, 1 Billion THz etc. )
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  11. Member
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    Originally Posted by sneaker View Post
    Well, you did rip this right from the Blu-Ray, didn't you? So it's like this on it.

    Why they did this I don't know. My guesses it's one/some/all of:
    1. authoring house didn't know any better
    2. authoring house missed this detail
    3. authoring house/studio wanted better numbers for better advertising (MORE = BETTER, RIGHT? 2048 bits, 1 Billion THz etc. )
    I didn't know if I may have had some settings messed up the file when I ripped the bluray and encoded it into the mkv file.
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  12. There is no free or cheap DTS-HD MA encoder so no one accidentally (re-)encodes DTS-HD MA at home. It must have been like this on the original Blu-Ray to begin with.
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