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  1. Member
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    Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post

    I found where to change the default to mp4, thank you. Is there any difference in these two or just the extension, in other words could you change the extension of an existing m4v to mp4 without any issues?
    yes

    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    As I mentioned in my original post I have numerous jobs I want to do and had hoped I could find one program which I could learn to use proficently. I bought a new Samsung TV which no longer plays avi files like my old Samsung did so have a large number of video files on a NAS drive I need to convert. While I want to maintain as much quality as reasonably possible I don't want to spend a bunch of time converting these and a slight quality loss is not a big deal as they are TV shows and movies. I also have a fairly large library of videos from a camcorder of kids and grandkids, family vacations, weddings etc etc so these I want to maintain as much quality as possible or perhaps even upscale some. I do have quite a bit in HD from a camcorder as well which I want to rip and put on my NAS drive so I can watch them from anywhere and don't always have to dig for the SD cards. These again I would want to maintain the quality. I also have some commercial Blu-Ray and DVDs that again want to rip to my NAS drive and keep as much quality as possible but again don't want to spend a ton of time.

    Perhaps I am being unreasonable in expecting I can get one program to perform all of these jobs. I had previously purchased Aimersoft and find it isn't too bad but does not do as good of a job of cropping as Handbrake does.
    There's not really one size fits all, it's best if you take it case by case. When you have a particular project in mind,
    open a new thread and people will help

    Does your new TV play MKV files? If so open the Mkvtoolnix GUI and re-wrap one of your avi files
    into MKV and see if the TV will play it.
    My LG TV works this way, it has no problem with Xvid/Divx/mp3 inside an MKV
    It will play MKV but it is slower to load for some reason and the controls for fast forward or rewind do not work the same way as for mp4 which again sounds odd but that is the way it is. so would prefer mp4 files.

    Right now I have a TV series I am ripping from DVD and following that will convert all the avi files I have. Once that is done I may start with some of the HD camcorder videos I have and can post again then for some guidance but for now ripping this one TV series and converting the avi files is at the top of the list.

    Thank you
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    I found where to change the default to mp4, thank you. Is there any difference in these two or just the extension, in other words could you change the extension of an existing m4v to mp4 without any issues?
    As I understand it... When Apple finally added AC3 audio to their MP4 videos they needed a way to differentiate the files so older devices didn't try to play the new files. That's where M4V was born. The choice of extension was unfortunate since M4V was already used form MPEG 4 elementary video streams. But Apple gets to do whatever they wants.

    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    I bought a new Samsung TV which no longer plays avi files like my old Samsung did so have a large number of video files on a NAS drive I need to convert. While I want to maintain as much quality as reasonably possible I don't want to spend a bunch of time converting these and a slight quality loss is not a big deal
    They can probably be remuxed into MKV or MP4. This would take very little time and there would be no quality loss. AviDemux is probably adequate for this. Open the source file, set video and audio to COPY, set the output container. Save.* Or you could use an ffmpeg batch file to remux an entire folder of AVI files at once.

    * I just ran a test: a 600 MB AVI file (Xvid video, AC3 audio) was remuxed by AviDemux to a 600 MB MP4 file in about 2 seconds.
    That sounds perfect for what I want to do. Can you do an entire folder with AviDemux as well or would you have to use ffmpeg?

    Thank you
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    There are programs in the software section of this site that may help
    MKVToolnix - rewrap almost anything to MKV (no re-encoding)
    MP4Box Gui - rewrap most things to mp4 (no re-encoding)
    MKVtoMP4 - quick MKV to MP4 container switch (only re-encodes audio under certain circumstances, otherwise no re-encode)

    Perhaps you should try them
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  4. Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    it seemed to me the bitrate of the source is relevant as using a higher bitrate that the source will only give you a larger output file with no improvement in quality.
    I quite clearly stated that every time you reencode a video with a lossy codec you will lose quality. But the more bitrate you use the less those losses will be. Say, for example, reencoding at the same bitrate loses 5 percent of the quality. Reencoding at twice the bitrate may lose only 2 percent of the quality.

    Beyond that, different codec families require different bitrates to retain quality. For example, if you were reencoding an h.264 video with MPEG 2, you might need 4 times as much bitrate to come close to the same quality. Even different encoders of the same family require different bitrates. For example Intel's Quick Sync h.264 encoder may require 50 percent or more bitrate than x264 to deliver similar quality -- even though they are both h.264 (MPEG 4 Part 10, aka AVC) encoders.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    I have either been misinformed or misunderstood as I was under the impression that that the output file cannot be better quality than the input or source aside from perhaps cleaning up noise or artifacts so it would seem setting a higher CRF or bitrate than the original source would just be creating a larger file size without any improvement in quality but as I say perhaps I am wrong.
    You are wrong. Every time you reencode a video with a lossy codec you will lose quality. Even if you use 2 or 5 or 10 times the bitrate.

    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    It would seem the RF in Handbrake must be tied to the presets in some way
    The relationship between preset, CRF, and bitrate is complex and varies from video to video. In general, slower presets deliver better quality -- the encoder works harder to find better ways to compress the video. At ultrafast and superfast you get very high bitrates (these are used mostly for real time compression when capturing where your primary concern is speed). From veryfast to placebo the bitrate doesn't decrease linearly (it can vary up and down) or by much (typically around 10 percent).
    Ultrafast and Superfast have a higher bitrate? I thought the faster the encoding or reencoding went the lower the quality?
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  6. Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    Ultrafast and Superfast have a higher bitrate? I thought the faster the encoding or reencoding went the lower the quality?
    Video compression isn't one single thing. It's a collection of methods. Some are very fast but don't compress much. Others can compress much more (and more accurately) but take longer to do so. x264's ultrafast preset uses only the fastest, least effective compression methods. As you move to slower presets slower and more effective methods are used.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by jackdup View Post
    Ultrafast and Superfast have a higher bitrate? I thought the faster the encoding or reencoding went the lower the quality?
    Video compression isn't one single thing. It's a collection of methods. Some are very fast but don't compress much. Others can compress much more (and more accurately) but take longer to do so. x264's ultrafast preset uses only the fastest, least effective compression methods. As you move to slower presets slower and more effective methods are used.
    Are you referring to the presets in Handbrake? Is that what you would recommend for ripping from a Blu-Ray or DVD? I am not really worried about compression only want a format compatible with my new TV.

    Also you had mentioned AviDemux for converting my AVIs. will this do a whole folder or do you have to load the files individually? What do you think of MP4Box.GUI Davexnet mentioned?
    Thanks again
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    Originally Posted by davexnet View Post
    There are programs in the software section of this site that may help
    MKVToolnix - rewrap almost anything to MKV (no re-encoding)
    MP4Box Gui - rewrap most things to mp4 (no re-encoding)
    MKVtoMP4 - quick MKV to MP4 container switch (only re-encodes audio under certain circumstances, otherwise no re-encode)

    Perhaps you should try them
    Thank you
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