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  1. Member
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    I definitely need more RAM, currently I have 16GB 2400mHz DDR4 but it is not enough for video rendering. I plan to increase the RAM to 64GB, the mobo maximum, by replacing it with 4X16GB new sticks. The board supports from 2133mHz to 4000+mHz DDR4. My question is, if I put in higher bus speed RAM, e. g. 3000mHz, am I likely to cause any problems? The CPU is Intel Core i7 8700k - Up to 4.7 GHz [6 Cores, 12 Threads].

    Thanks for any advice you can offer.
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  2. Member
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    You will need to overclock your RAM (use an XMP profile) to take advantage of RAM which supports speeds above 2666MHz. Otherwise your high-speed RAM will operate at 2133MHz - 2666MHz.

    The problems associated with overclocking are a reduction in a componentís lifespan due to increased heat generated by using higher voltage, and system instability.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 3rd Apr 2019 at 10:02.
    Ignore list: hello_hello, tried, TechLord
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  3. Member valvehead's Avatar
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    Filling all four slots with high capacity RAM is likely to cause stability problems. Go to the manufacturer's website for your motherboard, and you should be able to find a Memory QVL list (usually under Downloads near the manuals). This list contains RAM brands, speeds, and capacities in different combos that have been tested by the motherboard manufacturer. There might not be a 4x16GB combo in there, but it will help guide you.

    For overclocking, here is a thread with a list of achieved clocks by the forum members: Official Intel DDR4 24/7 Memory Stability Thread. There aren't many entries for 64GB (especially on mainstream platforms), but there might be some 2x16GB entries that will get you close. Just remember that memory overclocking these days is also dependent on the quality of the memory controller in the CPU, so there are no guaranties.
    valvehead//
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  4. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    When I encode my BD/DVDs to MKV/H.264/AC-3 with VidCoder, the amount of RAM used is about 3GB or less. I have 16GB RAM installed.
    You might want to check the amount of RAM used while encoding with your setup before adding more RAM for encoding.
    My PC converted this ~30GB BD to a main movie MKV in about 30 minutes. My Computer Details show my PC setup. It's not OC'd.
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    Last edited by redwudz; 3rd Apr 2019 at 14:32.
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  5. Originally Posted by DeJay View Post
    I definitely need more RAM, currently I have 16GB 2400mHz DDR4 but it is not enough for video rendering. I plan to increase the RAM to 64GB, the mobo maximum, by replacing it with 4X16GB new sticks. The board supports from 2133mHz to 4000+mHz DDR4. My question is, if I put in higher bus speed RAM, e. g. 3000mHz, am I likely to cause any problems? The CPU is Intel Core i7 8700k - Up to 4.7 GHz [6 Cores, 12 Threads].

    Thanks for any advice you can offer.
    I am currently using an i3 7100 (2C/4T) with 8GB DDR4 2400 coupled with a 32GB Optane SSD setup as swap and with hundreds of Firefox tabs I am still able to encode 1080p and 4k video.

    As a test I loaded a 1080p wmv file into Shotcut and applied 3 filters and started an x264 export; the whole thing, with Firefox tabs, youtube-dl gui and export is barely using 6GB of ram.

    What kind of video "rendering" are you doing that you think 16Gb ram is "definitely" not enough?
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  6. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    Doing the math...
    For rendering, where each frame or GOP must be encoded at a time, RAM needs are fairly reasonable. Triple-buffered 36bit 4k would use 3GB/frame for staging, so 4GB/frame is a good estimate without paging memory. If doing GOPs and you need direct unpaged access to reference frames, about 4 frames is all most GOP types would need, so 16GB makes sense. While it's always nice to have more RAM (assuming apps are written properly to not waste it or freak on abundance), it not necessary to do what you're wanting to do. Unless you are doing floating point RAW, HDR editing, multi-layer nested editing, stereo3D, 8k/16k frames. Maybe 32 but 64 is wasted overkill.

    If you really need to speed things up, do parallel processing of segments (with final re-assembly). A-la render farm.
    And use RAID and/or SSDs (so fetch access is FAST) and in multiples, so that you don't have queueing issues with drive access (reads & writes separated so can happen simultaneously).

    Also, separate your processing pass - NR, scaling, etc (with fast intermediate format) and your main crunching encoding pass (to longer gop h264, h265), otherwise you may encounter bottlenecks.

    Scott
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  7. Member
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    Thank you all, you have each given me some useful information.

    usually_quiet I don't want to overclock the system, but you have confirmed why in the mobo manual bus speeds above 2666 have (OC) added.

    valvehead I did as you suggested and found the memory list, I'll check it again carefully before I part with any cash.

    redwudz The system monitor in the panel shows the RAM being almost full, I just did a further test with the monitor open and the graph shows the RAM full when the system crashes.

    sophisticles I am rendering GoPro 2.7k (2704 x 1520) to ProRes standard, some of the ProRes clips are over 320mbps.

    Cornucopia I think you may be right about 64GB being overkill, but I was considering any possible future need to upgrade. The current cost of RAM is also a consideration, meaning is it cheaper to buy a 64GB kit now than 2 x 32GB ones, one now and one later. I think I may take your advice and just go to 32GB.

    I do separate processing passes, but in this instance I am simply rough trimming the GoPro footage and rendering in ProRes Standard for further processing.

    I do not have a swap partition to avoid slowing down in similar circumstances, so it needs to be more RAM. I could, of course, just do this transcoding in smaller batches, but it causes more work and the output numbering gets a bit confusing.

    I believe I have all the information I need. Thanks again.
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