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  1. Member
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    I am interested in how people approach the process of backing up, or replacing, their DVD/CD collection, to a HD. I just began copying some of my collection to HD. No store bought disks, all the disks are disks burned on a computer.
    My goals are
    1) Backup the DVD and toss the disk. I accomplish this by copying it to a portable HD and then backing up the HD to a second portable HD.
    2) I want to easily copy the DVD for trading purposes. So when I copy I copy the VTS folder off the DVD to the HD then I can simply copy it to disk for trading
    3) I want to watch the DVD easily. I can watch it easily with VLC on the computer. To watch it on a TV I extract an mpg and cast it to the TV using Videostream. I am not totally happy with this. I'd like to be able to cast the DVD as it is, but I don't think it's possible.

    That is my experience so far. I am currently exploring options on how to copy my CD collection. Let's have some discussion. It's the weekend!!!
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    As far as #3 goes, I use Handbrake to rip and convert my dvds to mp4, along with any chapter markers. MPC-HC recognizes the chapter markers, so I can navigate thru the chapters during playback.

    As an aside, I never get rid of the original media, even if I have backups. Maybe you could just trade the original disks?
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  3. Member
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    Thanks for replying. I have traded many of the disks, but many have been trashed. I like that Handbrake makes chapter points. Is the software hard to use? What does it cost?
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  4. Member
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    Originally Posted by kshavo View Post
    Thanks for replying. I have traded many of the disks, but many have been trashed. I like that Handbrake makes chapter points. Is the software hard to use? What does it cost?
    It's not hard to use, and there are guides online. it's also free. You can find it on this site here: https://www.videohelp.com/software/HandBrake
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  5. Banned
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    You know you've downloaded Handbrake correctly when you see the Pina Colada/Pineapple icon on your desktop. I have NO friggin' idea why that icon was used, but honestly I love it. It's fun, whimsical, and unpretentious (unlike other video crap that people rave about here)
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  6. Banned
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    I think I know why Handbrake uses a Pina Colada as their logo: Because after getting Virtualdub to actually do the job it was intended to do, you might need 3 of them. My Virtualdub (and yes, I downloaded the most recent, stable version) won't even recognize an mpeg-2 video (which is the entire purpose it was built for). That's like me getting a car, and it not recognizing the engine when I turn the key. How many codecs and bulls---t can a person go chasing after, seriously? I swear they make it like this just to laugh at you behind closed doors.
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  7. way to Rigel 7 cornemuse's Avatar
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    I for one, (I think the only one anymore), backup to iso images. I have had bad luck with MKV imaging. Some b/u's I want full disk, (series with episodes, etc), and, mostly want just the movie. With movies only, the chapters are still there. Copy iso's to smaller hdd & connect to media player connected to TV. Large hdds for backup, not watching. Iso to dvd piece of cake with Imgburn. Dont toss the disks!!
    Cranky Old Man
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    Toss the discs? Are you crazy? Just take your time and learn how to use Handbrake properly. Most people get it to spew out a video and think it's a success when it really looks like garbage.
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  9. Member
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    I agree with cornemuse. I prefer backing up DVD to ISO image, for it can bring much better quality than mp4 or mkv.
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    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    I agree with cornemuse. I prefer backing up DVD to ISO image, for it can bring much better quality than mp4 or mkv.
    MKV and MP4 are containers and can contain the video in its original bit for bit quality by remuxing.

    The primary advantage of an .ISO is that it can retain the menus and original structure of the disc as cornmuse stated.
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  11. Some questions you need to ask yourself"

    1: Are you wishing to reduce the space required or happy to keep the same space as the dvd is using, if so then just copy the dvd to hard drives(s) as it is preferred to have the menus etc, its just nicer.

    2: If not, or you want an automated way of copying dvd's without having to launch software every time I use a simple program "

    https://www.perfectautomation.com/solutions/copy-cd-dvd-hard-drive.html

    it stops sometimes but automatically copies the discs as you insert them

    3: I think Handbrake does not reduce the size so I use TMPG Mastering works 6 and have found it satisfactory.

    The point about keeping the dvd is is more relevant imho for commercially produced disks, I am glad I am creating a NAS with all my burnt discs and have 2 automated backup nas's, as burnt discs seem to damage more easily and some of mine, after about 10 years are showing signs of becoming unplayable.
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  12. Member
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    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    I agree with cornemuse. I prefer backing up DVD to ISO image, for it can bring much better quality than mp4 or mkv.
    MKV and MP4 are containers and can contain the video in its original bit for bit quality by remuxing.

    The primary advantage of an .ISO is that it can retain the menus and original structure of the disc as cornmuse stated.
    Actually, I don't think so. The DVD adopts MPEG-2 codec for video encoding. If you rip DVD to MKV or MP4, the video codec has been changed to the common VP8/VP9/HEVC (for MKV) or MPEG-4/H264/HEVC (for MP4). Where there is transcoding, there is quality loss.
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    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    I agree with cornemuse. I prefer backing up DVD to ISO image, for it can bring much better quality than mp4 or mkv.
    MKV and MP4 are containers and can contain the video in its original bit for bit quality by remuxing.

    The primary advantage of an .ISO is that it can retain the menus and original structure of the disc as cornmuse stated.
    Actually, I don't think so. The DVD adopts MPEG-2 codec for video encoding. If you rip DVD to MKV or MP4, the video codec has been changed to the common VP8/VP9/HEVC (for MKV) or MPEG-4/H264/HEVC (for MP4). Where there is transcoding, there is quality loss.
    MP4 and MKV are containers that can contain multiple types of video and audio including MPEG-2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_container_formats

    You can remux the contents of DVD into a .mkv or .mp4 file and retain the original content and quality.
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    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    Originally Posted by Ollie947732B View Post
    I agree with cornemuse. I prefer backing up DVD to ISO image, for it can bring much better quality than mp4 or mkv.
    MKV and MP4 are containers and can contain the video in its original bit for bit quality by remuxing.

    The primary advantage of an .ISO is that it can retain the menus and original structure of the disc as cornmuse stated.
    Actually, I don't think so. The DVD adopts MPEG-2 codec for video encoding. If you rip DVD to MKV or MP4, the video codec has been changed to the common VP8/VP9/HEVC (for MKV) or MPEG-4/H264/HEVC (for MP4). Where there is transcoding, there is quality loss.
    MP4 and MKV are containers that can contain multiple types of video and audio including MPEG-2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_container_formats

    You can remux the contents of DVD into a .mkv or .mp4 file and retain the original content and quality.
    Yes, I agree with you. But you need to make sure that the output profile of your DVD ripper supports MPEG2 codec.
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    There are only two options with ripping a Video-DVD. To .iso which contains the exact bit for bit (minus the copy protection) copy of the Video-DVD's contents and structure. Or to Video_TS and AUDIO_TS folders which contain the exact bit for bit contents of the VIDEO_TS/AUDIO_TS (99.9% of the time is empty) folders on the DVD. In both cases, there is NO conversion of the MPEG2 files (which are in contained in .vob containers).

    If you choose any other output option, you're ripping AND encoding the file into another video format, e.g. h264, .avi, .mpeg4 (which is NOT the same as the mp4 container). AFAIK, there is no program that will allow you to output directly to MPEG2. You have to use a program like VOB2MPG to strip the additional data in the .vob file to get an exact bit for bit copy of the MPEG2 file inside.

    While MakeMKV is often referred to a rip program, it's not, since it doesn't allow output to .iso or VIDEO_TS/AUDIO_TS files. It does remove the additional data in the .vob container and places the original bit for bit MPEG2 file in a .mkv container.

    Also, despite people using 'rip' to refer to capturing/digitizing analog video, such as from videotapes or laserdiscs, or downloading (web-dl (download))/capturing of a video/audio stream, it's not a 'rip', because as stated above, a 'rip' can only be a bit for bit copy of the contents of a DVD, Blu-Ray or CD to .iso or folders for DVD and Blu-Ray or .wav files for CDs.
    Last edited by lingyi; 6th May 2019 at 01:19. Reason: Grammar, clarity
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    Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
    While MakeMKV is often referred to a rip program, it's not, since it doesn't allow output to .iso or VIDEO_TS/AUDIO_TS files. It does remove the additional data in the .vob container and places the original bit for bit MPEG2 file in a .mkv container.
    I work in 2D animation and have a huge collection of animation on Blu-Rays and DVDs(classic Disney, Fleischer studio, Tex Avery, Walter Lantz, MGM, Miyasaki etc).
    Since I hate having to start a Blu-Ray/DVD for quick access to watch them, I have all my animation on one hard drive(plus backup HDs). I used MakeMKV for all of my disks. I thought the quality is pretty much the same as the original. How much loss in quality is there?
    Also one thing that bothers me is that MKV files a gigantic. Would a different format be just as good but a much smaller file size or is a MKV file the best quality you can expect for playing on your TV?
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  17. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    I've used MakeMKV for all my DVD and Blu ray. The MKV container works best with my Media player. Chapter and subtitles all preserved, if I don't want them I untick the elements not needed. Packed the discs up in a well sealed box and stored in my store room. In some jurisdictions if you "toss the discs" you will be in breach of local copyright law as you no longer "own the discs" or for that matter produce them. More important you may want to re copy them in the future. As my late freelance musician mum would say "always keep your options open!"
    BeyonWiz T3 PVR ~ Popcorn A-500 ~ Samsung ES8000 65" LED TV ~ Windows 7 64bit ~ Yamaha RX-A1070 ~ QnapTS851-4G
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    Originally Posted by Eljay View Post
    I used MakeMKV for all of my disks. I thought the quality is pretty much the same as the original. How much loss in quality is there?
    No loss in quality if you use MakeMKV. It's just the MPEG-2 video copied from the disc.

    Also one thing that bothers me is that MKV files a gigantic. Would a different format be just as good but a much smaller file size or is a MKV file the best quality you can expect for playing on your TV?
    Welcome to Videohelp! Converting video formats from one standard to another is exactly what this site is about. With video conversion it can be extremely subjective as to what is "better". Some videos can benefit from filtering, but it starts to become a real can of worms as you keep going. Unless you plan on it becoming a hobby it may be better to stick with the MKV's from MakeMKV.
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    Originally Posted by SaurusX View Post
    No loss in quality if you use MakeMKV. It's just the MPEG-2 video copied from the disc.
    Thanks. Good to know.

    Originally Posted by SaurusX View Post
    Unless you plan on it becoming a hobby it may be better to stick with the MKV's from MakeMKV.
    That was actually my attitude all these years. I just thought if there was a much better and simpler way to get a smaller file(an MKV file from an animated feature Blu-ray roughly has 20 GB) I could have saved much more space on my hard drive but aside from that I'm actually happy with my MKVs and really like the simplicity of the software MakeMKV that works like a charm.
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  20. Member dellsam34's Avatar
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    Burned DVD's means the copy protection no longer exists so the backup process should be easy with IMGBurn, Use the option create image file from disc, Most media players and computers play the disc image file just like a DVD disc:




    For Audio CD's use Exact Audio Copy EAC, After loading the CD it would look like this:




    After selecting a database from the 4 listed in the red circle it will look like this:




    Click on the button CMP with red arrow above to output as lossless compressed FLAC with album info and cover art loaded, When you load the albums to your smart device it would look like this (Ex: VOX Player):

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    Last edited by dellsam34; 26th May 2019 at 00:00.
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  21. Member
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    Thanks for this. I havn't been able to choose a method for CD's yet. I'll try this one.
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